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Mrs. March

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“I read Virginia’s novel in one sitting and was so captured by it I knew I had to make it and play Mrs. March. As a character, she is fascinating, complex, and deeply human and I can’t wait to sink my teeth into her.” ―Elisabeth Moss Who is Mrs. March? A twenty-first-century Highsmith, Virginia Feito conjures the unforgettable Mrs. March, an Upper East Side housewife whose l “I read Virginia’s novel in one sitting and was so captured by it I knew I had to make it and play Mrs. March. As a character, she is fascinating, complex, and deeply human and I can’t wait to sink my teeth into her.” ―Elisabeth Moss Who is Mrs. March? A twenty-first-century Highsmith, Virginia Feito conjures the unforgettable Mrs. March, an Upper East Side housewife whose life is shattered by her husband’s latest novel. In this astonishing debut, the venerable but gossipy New York literary scene is twisted into a claustrophobic fun house of paranoia, horror, and wickedly dark humor. George March’s latest novel is a smash. No one is prouder than Mrs. March, his doting wife. But one morning, the shopkeeper of her favorite patisserie suggests that his protagonist is based on Mrs. March herself: “But . . . ―isn't she . . .’ Mrs. March leaned in and in almost a whisper said, ‘a whore?” Clutching her ostrich-leather pocketbook, she flees, that one casual remark destroying her belief that she knew everything about her husband―as well as herself. Suddenly, Mrs. March is hurled into a harrowing journey that builds to near psychosis, one that begins merely within the pages of a book but may uncover both a killer and the long-buried secrets of her past.


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“I read Virginia’s novel in one sitting and was so captured by it I knew I had to make it and play Mrs. March. As a character, she is fascinating, complex, and deeply human and I can’t wait to sink my teeth into her.” ―Elisabeth Moss Who is Mrs. March? A twenty-first-century Highsmith, Virginia Feito conjures the unforgettable Mrs. March, an Upper East Side housewife whose l “I read Virginia’s novel in one sitting and was so captured by it I knew I had to make it and play Mrs. March. As a character, she is fascinating, complex, and deeply human and I can’t wait to sink my teeth into her.” ―Elisabeth Moss Who is Mrs. March? A twenty-first-century Highsmith, Virginia Feito conjures the unforgettable Mrs. March, an Upper East Side housewife whose life is shattered by her husband’s latest novel. In this astonishing debut, the venerable but gossipy New York literary scene is twisted into a claustrophobic fun house of paranoia, horror, and wickedly dark humor. George March’s latest novel is a smash. No one is prouder than Mrs. March, his doting wife. But one morning, the shopkeeper of her favorite patisserie suggests that his protagonist is based on Mrs. March herself: “But . . . ―isn't she . . .’ Mrs. March leaned in and in almost a whisper said, ‘a whore?” Clutching her ostrich-leather pocketbook, she flees, that one casual remark destroying her belief that she knew everything about her husband―as well as herself. Suddenly, Mrs. March is hurled into a harrowing journey that builds to near psychosis, one that begins merely within the pages of a book but may uncover both a killer and the long-buried secrets of her past.

30 review for Mrs. March

  1. 5 out of 5

    Regina

    Instructions for a successful reading experience with Mrs. March, Virginia Feito’s moody debut novel: Set this book aside to read the night after Christmas, once every last member of your dysfunctional family* has left, the insanity of the holiday has subsided, and you’re feeling you’ve lost your dang mind. Light a fire and pour yourself a giant glass of wine or whisky or whatever poison you prefer. Binge the book in one go so the next morning when you inevitably wake up thinking “WTF?!” you won’ Instructions for a successful reading experience with Mrs. March, Virginia Feito’s moody debut novel: Set this book aside to read the night after Christmas, once every last member of your dysfunctional family* has left, the insanity of the holiday has subsided, and you’re feeling you’ve lost your dang mind. Light a fire and pour yourself a giant glass of wine or whisky or whatever poison you prefer. Binge the book in one go so the next morning when you inevitably wake up thinking “WTF?!” you won’t be sure if it was the book, a dream, or your hangover. Mrs. March is a divisive work of literary psychological suspense in which a woman obviously named Mrs. March descends into madness. The story takes place during the Christmas and New Year season, it’s set in the atmospheric upper-class society of New York, and the time period is pretty vague (though my guess is late ‘60s???). Mrs. March’s husband, Mr. March, is a famous author whose latest book features a main character some have suggested seems inspired by Mrs. March. Unfortunately the character is an unlikable whore, so clearly that’s quite offensive to Mrs. March and pretty much drives her insane. Mrs. March will drive YOU insane if any of the following apply: - You’re annoyed by the amount of times I’ve used “Mrs. March” in this review. - Ambiguity does not appeal. - Stories by Alfred Hitchcock, Patricia Highsmith, and/or Virginia Woolf aren’t your jam. - A book with a planned movie adaptation that will probably be classified as horror is a hard pass. (I got serious Rosemary's Baby vibes, minus the whole demonic spawn of Satan aspect.) Mrs. March has not worked for many readers given the reasons listed above, but I kinda loved it. If you follow my instructions, you might too. *Oh, and to any of my family members reading this, it goes without saying that the holiday scenario described above is strictly hypothetical. ;) Blog: https://www.confettibookshelf.com/

  2. 5 out of 5

    Melissa ~ Bantering Books

    Be sure to visit Bantering Books to read all my latest reviews. It’s a shame Alfred Hitchcock is no longer with us. He would turn Virginia Feito’s chilling debut psychological thriller, Mrs. March, into a creeptastic movie. The good news is, in Hitchcock’s absence, Elisabeth Moss and her production company have snagged the film rights, with Moss planning to portray the titular character. But while I have no doubt she and her team will do a fine job bringing the story to life on the screen, I stil Be sure to visit Bantering Books to read all my latest reviews. It’s a shame Alfred Hitchcock is no longer with us. He would turn Virginia Feito’s chilling debut psychological thriller, Mrs. March, into a creeptastic movie. The good news is, in Hitchcock’s absence, Elisabeth Moss and her production company have snagged the film rights, with Moss planning to portray the titular character. But while I have no doubt she and her team will do a fine job bringing the story to life on the screen, I still wish the famed classic film director would be the one behind the camera. Because Mrs. March has HITCHCOCK written all over it. Forward, backward, upward, and downward. Diagonally, too. Feito’s novel is a disturbing character study of a woman spiraling into madness. After a shopkeeper innocently likens Mrs. March to the protagonist in her husband’s newest novel, Mrs. March begins to unravel. She’s anxious, paranoid, suspicious. And she declines rapidly, ultimately becoming trapped in a blurred reality, unable to separate fact from the fiction of her mind. To observe Mrs. March’s deterioration is eerie. Unnerving. Horrifying. But I must say, it makes for some fascinating reading. And the manner in which Feito tells the tale only adds to the intrigue. She writes with an air of mystery and dark humor, somehow distorting the story, giving it a surreal and fever-dream feel. It never reads clear. I’m still uncertain as to what is real versus imagined in the novel, and even small details like the time period, Mrs. March’s age, and her appearance are fuzzy. The ambiguity of it all is absolutely captivating. Inexplicably, however, Mrs. March loses a bit of steam in the final act. I find it difficult to identify the reason why since by this point, Mrs. March is the messiest of hot messes. But within myself, I noticed a slight disengagement from the story, and the best I can figure is that the last 50 pages aren’t as fully developed and deeply immersed in her broken mind. I sensed a separation from the character. Even so, unequivocally, Virginia Feito has written an impressive debut. Mrs. March is addictive, haunting, and twistedly entertaining. Hitchcock is smiling, I think. Bantering Books Instagram Twitter Facebook

  3. 5 out of 5

    Beata

    Definitely a disturbing read, with a complicated character, whose name we learn in the last sentence of the novel. Opening of the book brings to mind a famous novel by Virginia Wolf, however, several pages into it and we know this book has its own life. Mrs March, whose husband has just published a book everybody's reading, is cold and distant, probably the effect of the upbringing. A casual remark she hears changes her and unleashes events leading to a tragic finale. I was intrigued by the period Definitely a disturbing read, with a complicated character, whose name we learn in the last sentence of the novel. Opening of the book brings to mind a famous novel by Virginia Wolf, however, several pages into it and we know this book has its own life. Mrs March, whose husband has just published a book everybody's reading, is cold and distant, probably the effect of the upbringing. A casual remark she hears changes her and unleashes events leading to a tragic finale. I was intrigued by the period, it is hard to define, but the clothes and hairstyles and some hints would place it in the mid-sixties. I love the cover that reveals something about Mrs March. Not much is offered to make a reader feel for Mrs March, though she deserves sympathy after the truth about her childhood is revealed. A solid debut. *Many thanks to Virginia Feito, 4th Estate William Collins, and NetGalley for arc in exchange for my honest review.*

  4. 5 out of 5

    Michael David

    Who TF is Mrs. March? I’m still asking myself that. Mrs. March is married to author George March. She’s an esteemed lady, or at least she thinks so. Her husband respects her, or at least she thinks so... ...Until one day, when a lady assumes that the character in George’s newest hit novel is based on Mrs. March. The character in question is an ugly whore who nobody loves or respects. Mrs. March can’t shake it off, and decides to do some research. She finds some questionable articles in George’s stu Who TF is Mrs. March? I’m still asking myself that. Mrs. March is married to author George March. She’s an esteemed lady, or at least she thinks so. Her husband respects her, or at least she thinks so... ...Until one day, when a lady assumes that the character in George’s newest hit novel is based on Mrs. March. The character in question is an ugly whore who nobody loves or respects. Mrs. March can’t shake it off, and decides to do some research. She finds some questionable articles in George’s study...but is she prepared for the truth? Looking for a bad metaphor in a book review? I got you, boo! This book is like a helium balloon that starts out at full capacity until someone pokes a hole in it. The helium slowly leaks out until the balloon is flat, dead, and ready for recycling. Weird sh!t goes on involving cockroaches, mysterious voices, and blood. I hoped it would all lead to an explosive conclusion… ...But, I wasn’t blown away. I still question what really happened. A lot of folks enjoyed this more than I did, so please check out their reviews. As for me, it started at a 5...and then dropped to 4, 3, 2.5. Now available. Review also posted at: https://bonkersforthebooks.wordpress.com

  5. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    Have you ever wanted to read a character study on a woman who is completely deranged? Then I have the book for you. Meet Mrs. March. Mrs. March is at her local patisserie buying her black olive loaf and macaroons when the owner made a comment to her about how much she was loving her husbands new book and as an aside mentions also how the main character seems to be based on her. Mrs. March is appalled. That can't be true as the main character is a prostitute, a whore. There is no way George would Have you ever wanted to read a character study on a woman who is completely deranged? Then I have the book for you. Meet Mrs. March. Mrs. March is at her local patisserie buying her black olive loaf and macaroons when the owner made a comment to her about how much she was loving her husbands new book and as an aside mentions also how the main character seems to be based on her. Mrs. March is appalled. That can't be true as the main character is a prostitute, a whore. There is no way George would have written her as the main character of this filthy book or did he? The owner, seeing how distraught Mrs. March has become tries to back pedal but the damage has been done and this sets into motion a downward spiral into insanity. Mrs. March is so prim and proper with her pantyhose, practical loafers, and her favorite pair of gloves. It's hard to know as a reader what decade this is suppose to be or even how old Mrs. March is. In fact, you don't even know her first name until the very end of the book. When she speaks about herself, even reminiscing over her childhood memories, she always refers to herself as Mrs. March. I found that a quirky touch showing us readers just how unstable our narrator is. This is a puzzling read where it wasn't pitch black dark but the darkness is hovering in your peripheral vision. You know the entire time that something big is coming and it's the anticipation of that revelation that had me turning the pages. The finale is spectacular! Highly recommend! 4.5 stars!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Holly B

    Everyone in town is talking about it! George March's latest bestselling novel. Mrs. March stops at her favorite bakery to pick up some black olive bread and macarons when the cashier, Patricia, tells her she has been reading her husband's book. She tells her she can't put it down. And then asks her if its the first time he has based a character on her. Mrs. March is caught off guard. "What do you mean?" she asks. Patricia informs her how alike they are, the way they speak, dress, her mannerisms. Al Everyone in town is talking about it! George March's latest bestselling novel. Mrs. March stops at her favorite bakery to pick up some black olive bread and macarons when the cashier, Patricia, tells her she has been reading her husband's book. She tells her she can't put it down. And then asks her if its the first time he has based a character on her. Mrs. March is caught off guard. "What do you mean?" she asks. Patricia informs her how alike they are, the way they speak, dress, her mannerisms. Although she hasn't read the novel, Mrs. March knows the character is a prostitute, everything she would never want to be. Could her husband have done this? How dare he! Mrs. March runs out, abandoning her bags, despondent. Her descent begins, a slippery slope, a haunting journey. You realize early on that something is at odds, things don't add up. I felt trapped inside Mrs. March's head even though its written in third person. I loved the surreal tone, vivid descriptions, mystery, touch of horror/gloom that builds until the disturbing last twist. This is different and probably not for everyone. It may make you feel a bit uncomfortable, I felt a bit numb when finishing. It was an impressive debut and the writing is stunning, psychologically complex with all the bread crumbs if you pay attention. Library loan/ Read in August 2021

  7. 4 out of 5

    Fran

    "...the latest cocktail-party conversation starter...soon to be heralded as George March's magnum opus...". Mrs. March had supported George all through his writing career. She listened to his potential story lines and his newest ideas. "She flattered him. All for him, for her George." She would host an intimate gathering in their Upper East Side apartment in celebration of his latest novel. Mrs. March would have liked to appear carefree and confident. Instead, she always felt inadequate and subst "...the latest cocktail-party conversation starter...soon to be heralded as George March's magnum opus...". Mrs. March had supported George all through his writing career. She listened to his potential story lines and his newest ideas. "She flattered him. All for him, for her George." She would host an intimate gathering in their Upper East Side apartment in celebration of his latest novel. Mrs. March would have liked to appear carefree and confident. Instead, she always felt inadequate and substandard. "Mrs. March's pulse quickened with the telltale excitement and wariness that always manifested right before she interacted with others". At her favorite patisserie, the manager sang the praises of George's novel but asked Mrs. March if the main character, Johanna, was based upon her. "I picture you when I read it"...your mannerisms and attire. Oh, no! The main character was a woman of ill repute, a whore losing her clientele. Imagine a parallel between Mrs. March and that fictitious woman. "...but George would never...would he?" Party night. Mrs. March found it difficult to make small talk. "She was prone to rehearsing potential snippets of conversation...". The tray of luscious strawberries would impress the guests. An overheard conversation sent the tray clattering, propelling the strawberries across the expensive rug. "Do you think she knows? About Johanna?...shushing and scattered giggling...". "It wasn't so much that Johanna was unlikeable as Mrs. March was, too." George tried to explain that Johanna was not based on anyone. She just is. It seemed to Mrs. March that Johanna existed while she faded away. The fact that Mrs. March's first name was not revealed magnified the perception of a tightly wound wife, mother and soiree host. Her identity seemed to be usurped by the protagonist in George's novel. A window into Mrs. March's childhood would show an upbringing devoid of parental love. As a child, she fixated on a painting of a girl wrapped in a shimmering silky shawl. She talked to the girl, interacting with her daily. She took "Kiki" everywhere. At school, Kiki whispered answers to math problems in her ear. Was George capable of unspeakable acts? In Mrs. March's imaginings, "there was something off about this man. It was George-it had his face and wore his cardigan-yet her gut told her that it wasn't. Had George been replaced by an impostor? Might there be another "her" as well?" "Mrs. March" by Virginia Feito is a tome about a wealthy housewife who loses her grip on reality. Mrs. March is an unreliable narrator. Are the events real, or a product of her inner turmoil and descent into madness? This riveting, unputdownable, debut novel has been optioned for a cinematic adaptation. I am excited! Highly recommended. Thank you Liveright/ W.W. Norton & Company and Net Galley for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ceecee

    George March has a new book published, its his magnum opus and well on its way into the best seller list. When Patricia at the bakery dares to suggest to Mrs March that surely the main character is based on herself and yet isn’t Johanna a whore??? Mrs March is horrified and vows never to buy her pastries there again. The following day the couple host a pre Christmas party for the great and good of the literati world where Mrs March fears they are talking about her and far worse, laughing at her. George March has a new book published, its his magnum opus and well on its way into the best seller list. When Patricia at the bakery dares to suggest to Mrs March that surely the main character is based on herself and yet isn’t Johanna a whore??? Mrs March is horrified and vows never to buy her pastries there again. The following day the couple host a pre Christmas party for the great and good of the literati world where Mrs March fears they are talking about her and far worse, laughing at her. ‘Do you think she knows? About Johanna?’ .... this is the straw that broke the camels back as she sinks into despair and paranoia as she loses her grip on reality. Wow. What an excellent debut which is an absorbing read but which also makes you feel uneasy in a number of ways. It’s a character driven dark exploration of someone’s mind as she veers and swings from manic with her mind in overdrive as she becomes increasingly suspicious of George and then she’s almost passive, fearful and lacking in confidence. There are some vivid scenes such as the party which is the catalyst to what follows and at times it’s difficult to know what is illusion and delusion. Mrs March has a disturbing past and that too adds to the unsettling feel. You are desperately sorry for her as she’s so alone, excluded and has been all her life. We don’t even know her Christian name until the end which makes her an appendage to George rather than a person in her own right which is clever. . Who exactly is Mrs March?? It’s not only her character that disturbs as so does her eight year old son Jonathan, what is going on there???? George is more peripheral but is absolutely key to the ensuing events as you wonder too, exactly what is George guilty of? I enjoy puzzling the time frame too, the brilliant cover suggests 1950’s and early 1960’s and this adds to the whole intriguing puzzle. The ending is very good and like what has gone before leaves you full of disquiet and unnerved. This is one book I will not forget and it’ll be fascinating to see how Elisabeth Moss portrays her. Overall, this is a very compelling book as it has so many facets to it from the exploration of a troubled mind based on past and present events, to a chaotic life with growing suspicions of her husband which builds and builds to a dramatic conclusion. It’s clear that as a writer Virginia Feito is going places. With thanks to NetGalley and especially to 4th Estate and William Collins for the much appreciated arc in return for an honest review. Thank you to GR friends for putting this on my radar!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sandy *The world could end while I was reading and I would never notice*

    EXCERPT: When she padded back to bed, something caught her eye in the building opposite. A red light in one of the windows. She tensed, her first thought that it was a fire, but as she looked longer, she realized it was a lamp draped in cherry coloured organza, which cast a warm glow. The various other windows in building were mostly dark, some strobing with the soft pulse of a television screen. She moved closer to her own window, her nose almost pressing against the glass. It had begun to snow EXCERPT: When she padded back to bed, something caught her eye in the building opposite. A red light in one of the windows. She tensed, her first thought that it was a fire, but as she looked longer, she realized it was a lamp draped in cherry coloured organza, which cast a warm glow. The various other windows in building were mostly dark, some strobing with the soft pulse of a television screen. She moved closer to her own window, her nose almost pressing against the glass. It had begun to snow. The snowflakes floated down, the ones passing by the window illuminated red for a split second, lighting up like embers before continuing their descent, the black night flickering saffron, hellish. Her eyes went back to the glowing room. It was a bedroom, dark except for the reddish glow. After some seconds she managed to make out a woman, bent over, her back to the window. She was wearing a pink silk slip, her milky thighs on full display. Mrs March cleared her throat, then looked over her own shoulder, as if someone had caught her spying. She trained her eyes back on the woman. What was she bending over? Mrs March could see the corner of a mattress, or a couch cushion. Leaning further, she bumped her forehead against the windowpane and, as if she had heard her, the woman in the pink slip turned around. From Mrs March's throat issued an unwilling sound, some tortured garble between a gasp and a scream. There was blood - so much blood - soaking the front of the woman's slip and matting her hair and staining her hands - hands now pressed against the window to form bloody prints. Mrs March pushed herself away from the window in one jerky movement, falling backward onto the bed, her book crunching underneath her spine. She failed her arms toward George's bedside table, shaking her hands free of the numbness creeping up to her fingers. She pulled the telephone to her and crept to the window. The cord went taut, halting her movement. She stood there, the receiver pressed to her ear - the dial tone now a harsh beeping - as she looked out across the courtyard. The red glow was gone. The woman was gone, too. ABOUT 'MRS MARCH': George March’s latest novel is a smash hit. None could be prouder than Mrs. March, his dutiful wife, who revels in his accolades and relishes the lifestyle and status his success brings. A creature of routine and decorum, Mrs. March lives an exquisitely controlled existence on the Upper East Side. Every morning begins the same way, with a visit to her favourite patisserie to buy a loaf of olive bread, but her latest trip proves to be her last when she suffers an indignity from which she may never recover: an assumption by the shopkeeper that the protagonist in George March’s new book – a pathetic sex worker, more a figure of derision than desire – is based on Mrs. March. One casual remark robs Mrs. March not only of her beloved olive bread but of the belief that she knew everything about her husband – and herself – sending her on an increasingly paranoid journey, one that starts within the pages of a book but may very well uncover both a killer and the long-buried secrets of Mrs. March’s past. MY THOUGHTS: Mrs March by Virginia Feito is a strangely compelling and disturbing read. We follow the journey of Mrs March as she descends from a lifestyle of privilege and status as the wife of a successful author, into the realms of paranoia and psychosis as she comes to believe that the main character in her husband's latest book, an ugly prostitute named Johanna, is based on her. Mrs March is very much a character driven book, and Mrs March is very much the main character. She appears to have no friends, merely acquaintances. She is terrified of her housekeeper. She maintains a very distant relationship with her son. And even the relationship between her and her husband is very formal. We don't even know Mrs March's first name until the final few sentences. She is quite childlike in her inability to take care of herself and her family. The era Mrs March is set in isn't specified, although I would guess it to be the late 1950s or early 1960s. The book itself is a bit of an enigma. I had questions racing through my mind all the time I was reading. Some were answered. Some weren't. The finale is quite spectacular, and for me was totally unexpected. This is an outstanding debut novel. ⭐⭐⭐.9 #MrsMarch #NetGalley I: @4thestatebooks #domesticdrama #historicalfiction #mentalhealth #mystery #psychologicalsuspense THE AUTHOR: A native of Spain, Virginia Feito was raised in Madrid and Paris, and studied English and drama at Queen Mary University of London. She lives in Madrid, where she writes her fiction in English. (Amazon) DISCLOSURE: Thank you to 4th Estate and William Collins via Netgalley for providing a digital ARC of Mrs March by Virginia Feito for review. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own personal opinions. For an explanation of my rating system please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the about page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com This review is also published on Twitter, Amazon, Instagram and https://sandysbookaday.wordpress.com/...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    3.5⭐ I probably wouldn't have read/listen to this book if it weren't for the positive feeds on Goodreads. If I don't know the author, I'd look for a pretty cover. I don't like this cover. So many thanks to friends on here who put this book on my radar. I listened to the sample and just loved it. I love the first third of the book. The pace is consistent throughout, and the writing is very atmospheric. I was hooked for the most part, but this is a predictable story while I was waiting for some kin 3.5⭐ I probably wouldn't have read/listen to this book if it weren't for the positive feeds on Goodreads. If I don't know the author, I'd look for a pretty cover. I don't like this cover. So many thanks to friends on here who put this book on my radar. I listened to the sample and just loved it. I love the first third of the book. The pace is consistent throughout, and the writing is very atmospheric. I was hooked for the most part, but this is a predictable story while I was waiting for some kind of a twist. Mrs. March is married to George March who recently had immense success with his latest novel. Everyone seems to be reading his novel, but her. But then she's told that the protagonist may be based on her, but the character is a prostitute! She becomes suspicious about George and goes through his things and found items that make him even more questionable. After a while, I don't know what's real and what's Mrs. March's imagination. I'm going between 3-4 stars. I don't think the second half is as strong as the beginning. Still, it was very entertaining!

  11. 5 out of 5

    JaymeO

    Soon to be a major motion picture starring Elizabeth Moss! Mrs. March is a self-proclaimed observer who is caught up in appearances. She even married her husband because everyone said, “George March is the most attractive man on campus.” But, who is George March? How well does she really know her husband? When Mrs. March visits her favorite shop for her usual loaf of olive bread, the shopkeeper insinuates that the main character in her husband’s new best-selling book is based on her. Mrs. March i Soon to be a major motion picture starring Elizabeth Moss! Mrs. March is a self-proclaimed observer who is caught up in appearances. She even married her husband because everyone said, “George March is the most attractive man on campus.” But, who is George March? How well does she really know her husband? When Mrs. March visits her favorite shop for her usual loaf of olive bread, the shopkeeper insinuates that the main character in her husband’s new best-selling book is based on her. Mrs. March is horrified! How can that be? George’s book is about a prostitute, right? Why would he humiliate her like that? Or did he? You see, she hasn’t actually read the book. Mrs. March snoops around in George’s office for clues about herself in his book and comes across an article he saved about a woman who was recently murdered. She soon becomes increasingly convinced that she doesn’t really know her husband. Could he actually be capable of murder? Newcomer Virginia Feito has written a deeply disturbing, character driven, suspenseful, creepy, dark psychological thriller that keeps you guessing until the very last page. Fair warning, this book deals with abuse, trauma, and public humiliation. Mrs. March is one of the most compellingly complex characters I have encountered in a long time. She is expertly flawed and therefore so incredibly “real.” This book reads like a movie, so I can see how this will translate well to film. And Elizabeth Moss? OMG, excuse me while I grab my popcorn! While I had a difficult time placing the time period due to anomalies (a microwave?), I enjoyed the trip back in time (whenever that may have been). While I had absolutely no idea where the plot was heading for most of book, I absolutely could not stop turning the pages. Overall, I would have liked more explanation from the reveal, but this is one of those books that makes you think, What did I just read? What just happened? What is real? What is imagined? Just brilliant! 4.5/5 stars rounded up Thank you to Edelweiss and the publisher for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    “Mrs. March” by Virginia Feito is one strange suspenseful read. It’s an up-close observation of a woman overwhelmed by psychosis. Best of all, there’s talk of this being made into a movie starring Elisabeth Moss. The story begins deliciously; Mrs. March is retrieving her daily olive bread from her favorite bakery. The worker mentions that she is almost finished with Mr. March’s new novel, and she not only loves the book, but believes that the main character was inspired by Mrs. March. Mrs. March “Mrs. March” by Virginia Feito is one strange suspenseful read. It’s an up-close observation of a woman overwhelmed by psychosis. Best of all, there’s talk of this being made into a movie starring Elisabeth Moss. The story begins deliciously; Mrs. March is retrieving her daily olive bread from her favorite bakery. The worker mentions that she is almost finished with Mr. March’s new novel, and she not only loves the book, but believes that the main character was inspired by Mrs. March. Mrs. March gasps, “But the main character, it—isn’t she…a whore?” Yes, Johanna, the main character, is a prostitute whose johns pay her out of pity, as she is unlovable and wretched. To Mrs. March, where appearances are everything, this is devastating. Author Feito reenforces this guarded sentiment by referring to Mrs. March by only “Mrs. March”, even in the flashbacks of her youth. Amazingly, the story takes place in a short period of time of a few days. But we painstakingly learn of the monotony of Mrs. March’s life. Added to that, Mrs. March was raised by a judgmental mother, thereby making her inner musings very judgmental. Mrs. March lives on the Upper East Side in Manhattan which contributes to her overcritical observations. As we journey through life in Mrs. March’s head, we feel anxiety. We know this is only getting worse and will not end well. Her delusions overcome her senses and makes the reader question theirs. While Mrs. March goes through her day, we don’t fully know what is real and what has she conjured? Author Feito brings us along with Mrs. March so that we start believing what she believes, and then we doubt later. This is a fantastic story that challenges the reader to ascertain what is real and what is an illusion. This is a fun trip to crazy.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Olive Fellows (abookolive)

    Click here to hear my thoughts on this book over on my Booktube channel, abookolive. A deeply unsettling and highly literary thriller in which we enter the increasingly unstable mind of the wife of a famous novelist. Mrs. March is convinced that her husband based the antiheroine of his latest bestseller on her, his wife of fifteen years, and she's terrified that the unflattering portrait will shatter her image in polite society, quite possibly her most prized possession. Even though it's slower i Click here to hear my thoughts on this book over on my Booktube channel, abookolive. A deeply unsettling and highly literary thriller in which we enter the increasingly unstable mind of the wife of a famous novelist. Mrs. March is convinced that her husband based the antiheroine of his latest bestseller on her, his wife of fifteen years, and she's terrified that the unflattering portrait will shatter her image in polite society, quite possibly her most prized possession. Even though it's slower in pace, this one had my heart pounding the whole way through. See the above review for a deeper character dissection of the disturbed Mrs. March. I can't wait to see Elisabeth Moss take on this character in the forthcoming adaptation!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Elyse Walters

    Audiobook…. narrated by Elizabeth Rogers ….8 hours and 27 minutes MINI review: The audio-narration was *terrific*! The brilliant visually experienced beginning will hook even the most apathetic-reader… But…. for the longest time I couldn’t figure out who was more mysterious—Mr. or Mrs. March. ….Appearances were very important to Mrs. March— ….Mr. March knew this about his wife too….. But ‘who’ was most tire of pretending that they were not honesty a happy married couple—Mr. or Mrs. March? Engrossing Audiobook…. narrated by Elizabeth Rogers ….8 hours and 27 minutes MINI review: The audio-narration was *terrific*! The brilliant visually experienced beginning will hook even the most apathetic-reader… But…. for the longest time I couldn’t figure out who was more mysterious—Mr. or Mrs. March. ….Appearances were very important to Mrs. March— ….Mr. March knew this about his wife too….. But ‘who’ was most tire of pretending that they were not honesty a happy married couple—Mr. or Mrs. March? Engrossing atmosphere-eerie-diabolical descriptions….(as memorable as the characters) ….”A fly was stuck to Mrs. March’s croissant”… ….Putrid smells from old meat…(symbolic to this psychological suspense tale) ….At a hair salon, Mrs. March chewed the inside of her mouth until it bleed…(pretty on the outside, suffering on the inside?) ….Ladies gossiped—“Mrs. March must be so proud of her husband, George’s new hit book….(shhh..a “whore” was his main character) ….a son named Jonathan; a step daughter named Paula; a house cleaner named Martha…(every character is mysterious)… ….Black bread with olives, macaroons, peach lipstick, Mint green gloves, a private men’s club, a jealous wife?, a cheating-lying husband? ….. Deliciously dark! Kept me INTRIGUED!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Tina

    This is a Mystery/Thriller. The writing style in this book was just not for me. I was just felt that this book was going to put me to sleep by the 55% of this book, and I could not keep reading. I found this book so boring, and I did not care about any of the characters. I really just did not understand it. Maybe it is just me. I was kindly provided an e-copy of this book by the publisher or author via NetGalley, so I can give an honest review about how I feel about this book. I want to send a b This is a Mystery/Thriller. The writing style in this book was just not for me. I was just felt that this book was going to put me to sleep by the 55% of this book, and I could not keep reading. I found this book so boring, and I did not care about any of the characters. I really just did not understand it. Maybe it is just me. I was kindly provided an e-copy of this book by the publisher or author via NetGalley, so I can give an honest review about how I feel about this book. I want to send a big Thank you to them for that.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    Intriguing cover, right? Those crisp mint green ladies gloves are being pulled securely and tauntly over hands that definitely need to get a grip. There's a bit of tension in those fingertips for good reason. Meet Mrs. March. There was a time, back-in-the-day, when women were recognized fully by their husband's name. Mrs. John Smith and the like. No identity outside of the wedded bliss. Even Virginia Feito plays a shell game with Mrs. March's real first name. We won't come upon it until the end. M Intriguing cover, right? Those crisp mint green ladies gloves are being pulled securely and tauntly over hands that definitely need to get a grip. There's a bit of tension in those fingertips for good reason. Meet Mrs. March. There was a time, back-in-the-day, when women were recognized fully by their husband's name. Mrs. John Smith and the like. No identity outside of the wedded bliss. Even Virginia Feito plays a shell game with Mrs. March's real first name. We won't come upon it until the end. Mrs. March is mechanical in nature. She frequents the same shops and orders the same items as if it were a ritual. She stands obediently in line waiting to be served in her favorite bakery. She begins chitchating with her favorite clerk. The clerk compliments Mrs. March on her husband George's newly published book. Then, unexpectantly, the clerk comments that the character of Johanna must be based on Mrs. March herself. As if struck by lightning, Mrs. March escapes through the crowd and out the door. What's the big deal? Well, Johanna, in the book, is a well-defined prostitute with a very abrasive personality. A daintily gloved lady facing a common bakery clerk can be hit with the mimicking golf club alongside the head that roars of humiliation. Once home, Mrs. March ransacks her husband's office for clues to this protagonist. Note to Mrs. March: Be careful while shifting through piles of papers and the like. The truth can sprout legs and crawl right onto your lap. Virginia Feito has dabbled into some areas of dark woowoo here. She has Mrs. March sitting on the back burner coming to a full boil. Step back. We'll have to swipe out those mint gloves for some actual oven mitts to grab onto this one. And what's the deal with Mrs. March's housekeeper, Martha? And add to this the elusive son, Jonathan. Mrs. March is an exceptional piece of work by Feito. She sets out a road map which will take us through some back roads of Mrs. March's strange childhood and the like. It's gonna be one crazy ride until we reach our final destination. Wowzers!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I listened to the audiobook.. the narrator was very good.. but, this just wasn’t enjoyable for me. Mrs March is a a high society woman, the wife of a well known author who currently has a best selling novel. Everywhere she goes, she’s getting the impression that people think she is the main character in her husbands new book. This sets her life in disarray… She is on the brink of madness… and it only gets worse. I was quite enjoying it in the beginning but it just got too weird for me later on.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Blair

    I thought ‘Shirley Jackson meets Ottessa Moshfegh meets My Sister the Serial Killer’ would be just about impossible to live up to, but in fact, it’s really quite accurate. This is almost exactly the book I wanted Moshfegh’s Death in Her Hands to be. Mrs March is the wife of a successful novelist whose perfectly ordered life is thrown into turmoil when she makes an upsetting discovery: her husband, George, has based the protagonist of his latest novel on her. The problem is that the character I thought ‘Shirley Jackson meets Ottessa Moshfegh meets My Sister the Serial Killer’ would be just about impossible to live up to, but in fact, it’s really quite accurate. This is almost exactly the book I wanted Moshfegh’s Death in Her Hands to be. Mrs March is the wife of a successful novelist whose perfectly ordered life is thrown into turmoil when she makes an upsetting discovery: her husband, George, has based the protagonist of his latest novel on her. The problem is that the character of Johanna is an utterly pitiful figure, a whore nobody wants to sleep with, a ‘weak, plain, detestable, pathetic, unloved, unlovable wretch’. Mrs March’s whole existence is circumscribed by her identity as a wife (a fact underscored by the fact that she is always, even in flashbacks to childhood, referred to as Mrs March), and as the security of that position seems to fall away, she becomes increasingly unstable. When she finds a newspaper clipping about a missing girl in George’s study, she is led to a horrifying but seemingly inescapable conclusion. I was sceptical, at first, about the incident that sets the whole thing in motion: as it seems everyone agrees that Johanna has no redeeming qualities whatsoever, it seems incredible that the Marchs’ baker would blithely chat away about how the character is so obviously Mrs March – to Mrs March. But this story, as it turns out, is full of similarly dubious moments, clues (or are they?) that cross the page and then scurry out of sight like the cockroaches that become something of an emblem. It’s cleverly evasive throughout: as well as Mrs March’s name, her age is unclear, as is the time period in which the novel is taking place, which feels like it could be anytime between the 1950s and 1980s. As a result I always felt like Feito was one step ahead of me, which, of course, she was. As Mrs March’s paranoia grows and she makes a series of choices that seem to escalate in derangement, it’s difficult not to squirm and cringe. Yet everything comes together perfectly in an ending that is both tragic and cathartic. I was really impressed with this debut, which is deliciously dark, witty, and great at balancing an effective lack of specificity with a well-structured plot. TinyLetter | Linktree

  19. 5 out of 5

    Brittney Rae

    Why did I trust Elisabeth Moss?

  20. 4 out of 5

    Toni

    Hold on, is this a clever retelling of Macbeth?! The visions, the blood, the murder? Just a thought friends. ‘Mrs. March,’ the debut novel by Virginia Feito, is more weird than eerie, but wonderfully so! It’s like entering a ‘Fun House’ during Halloween from the Fifties. It’s scary, but not terrifying and gory like the ones our teenagers love today. However, this weird Fun House is located in Mrs. March’s mind, all endless hallways, and closed doors, never knowing where you’ll end up or with who Hold on, is this a clever retelling of Macbeth?! The visions, the blood, the murder? Just a thought friends. ‘Mrs. March,’ the debut novel by Virginia Feito, is more weird than eerie, but wonderfully so! It’s like entering a ‘Fun House’ during Halloween from the Fifties. It’s scary, but not terrifying and gory like the ones our teenagers love today. However, this weird Fun House is located in Mrs. March’s mind, all endless hallways, and closed doors, never knowing where you’ll end up or with whom, or AS whom. You see, Mrs. March, we don’t learn her name until the very last sentence, is the wife of the bestselling novelist, George March, who has just published his latest book. Living in New York, particularly the Upper East Side of Manhattan, she can’t seem to get away from it. The book is in storefronts, in people’s hands as they walk, and even grocery carts at the local market. I might mention that the undeclared timeframe is pre-technology, especially cell phones. This makes it more fun to me since the characters have to work a tad harder to seek information by reading newspapers and books. Mrs. March is proud of her husband’s success; this isn’t his first novel so she should be used to the hoopla of excitement and publicity. But an innocent remark from the attendant at her favorite patisserie seems to turn a switch in Mrs. March’s fragile mind. The women mentions that the protagonist in George’s book seems to be just like Mrs. March, “The way she says things, her mannerisms, …. even the way she dresses.” Mrs. March has scanned the book but she’s fairly certain it’s about a prostitute in Paris. How in the world can that have anything to do with her? This little incident sets off a tiny explosion in Mrs. March’s brain that leads her to a tailspin of epic proportions. She becomes obsessed with discovering why and what would lead George to write this particular story. Is it about her? She must find out. Mrs. March becomes an amateur detective suspecting George’s every move into something more sinister, including murder. Those hallways in her mind are endless and those doorways lead to every shred of a clue she can imagine. Is George innocent and truthful or is he ‘gaslighting’ his sensitive wife? Or is Mrs. March the unbalanced one and is she slowly losing her mind? Where will this end up? The ending is worth every minute of reading this psychological drama. Thank you, W.W. Norton & Company, and Liveright.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Faith

    Mrs. March (first name unrevealed until the last sentence) sinks into madness. She is triggered by the suggestion that an unpleasant character in her husband’s new book was based on her. There is nothing else in the book that suggests why she is suddenly insane. The book could have used some clues about that. However, I liked the writing style, heavy on internal monologue, and I was never bored. I can see why the actress Elizabeth Moss would want to play the character of Mrs. March. There will b Mrs. March (first name unrevealed until the last sentence) sinks into madness. She is triggered by the suggestion that an unpleasant character in her husband’s new book was based on her. There is nothing else in the book that suggests why she is suddenly insane. The book could have used some clues about that. However, I liked the writing style, heavy on internal monologue, and I was never bored. I can see why the actress Elizabeth Moss would want to play the character of Mrs. March. There will be ample opportunities for chewing up the scenery as real, imagined and suppressed events overtake Mrs. March. I would read more by this author.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Darla

    Yikes! Living inside Mrs. March's head was messing with my mind. The cover is perfect. Those mint green gloves! What are they hiding? What do they mean to Mrs. March? This was a much anticipated read for me. I have been hearing about it for months. For me it was a solid 3.5/5 stars. It is most certainly an interesting premise to be fixated on whether you are the inspiration for the not-so-wholesome heroine of you husband's latest book. George March did not really come to life for me. He was a bi Yikes! Living inside Mrs. March's head was messing with my mind. The cover is perfect. Those mint green gloves! What are they hiding? What do they mean to Mrs. March? This was a much anticipated read for me. I have been hearing about it for months. For me it was a solid 3.5/5 stars. It is most certainly an interesting premise to be fixated on whether you are the inspiration for the not-so-wholesome heroine of you husband's latest book. George March did not really come to life for me. He was a bit flat. And what is going on with Jonathan, her son? What was most interesting was the fact that Mrs. March is so firmly fixed on her identity as a wife to George March that even in her childhool reminiscing she refers to herself as Mrs. March. So much to process. . . I need a book buddy to discuss this with. I have so many questions! Thank you to Liveright and Edelweiss+ for a DRC in exchange for an honest review.

  23. 4 out of 5

    MicheleReader

    Mrs. March was high on my to-read list ever since I saw that actress Elisabeth Moss and her production company are developing the book into a feature film. Once I had the visual of the talented actress (Mad Men, The Handmaid’s Tale) as the troubled Mrs. March, it made the book come to life while reading every intense page. Mrs. March (we do not learn her first name until the end) lives a priviledged life on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. Her husband is a celebrated author. She starts to believe th Mrs. March was high on my to-read list ever since I saw that actress Elisabeth Moss and her production company are developing the book into a feature film. Once I had the visual of the talented actress (Mad Men, The Handmaid’s Tale) as the troubled Mrs. March, it made the book come to life while reading every intense page. Mrs. March (we do not learn her first name until the end) lives a priviledged life on Manhattan’s Upper East Side. Her husband is a celebrated author. She starts to believe that the highly unappealing central character in his latest book is based on her. We then watch Mrs. March unravel as she loses touch with reality. She sees things that aren’t there. She starts exhibiting signs of extreme paranoia. Mrs. March, who has a distant relationship with her family, is not a very sympathetic or likeable character. Yet she is a mother of an eight-year old boy who needs her. And what about husband Charles March? Does he see what’s going on or is he too absorbed in the success of his new novel? At one point, Mrs. March starts to suspect her husband of murder. This was such an uncomfortable book to read that I kept thinking, “Am I loving or really disliking this book?” Turns out I did like it. But it was too unsettling to love. Maybe I'll love the movie as I believe Moss will bring a vulnerability to the role that I wasn’t getting from the words on the page (perhaps the audio version is the way to go.) I was intrigued that the author never revealed what year this story takes place in. She left clues though. There are no mentions of cell phones or technology. Mrs. March and most of the affluent women are wearing long fur coats. People are using payphones. She papered the walls in her son’s room with fabric from Ralph Lauren. If the book had taken place in current times, I’d expect or at least hope that there would have been better awareness of mental health disorders. This is author Virginia Feito’s debut novel, which is incredibly impressive. And she is writing the screenplay for the movie, which is a good thing. I’ll put Mrs. March in the “not for everyone but worth a look” file. And stay tuned for the movie. Rated 3.75 stars. Review posted on MicheleReader.com.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bandit

    If profoundly disturbed is how you want to walk away from a book…well, look no further. And sure, women have been going mad in fiction for ages, they’ve been secreted away in the attics and madhouses, there was fire, wallpapers, other women to contend and compete with and usually a man behind it all, a brute or sadist or bastard or some combination thereof. But what if there was a madness that needed no assist to descend, something more…organic, if you will. What if a woman went mad from within, If profoundly disturbed is how you want to walk away from a book…well, look no further. And sure, women have been going mad in fiction for ages, they’ve been secreted away in the attics and madhouses, there was fire, wallpapers, other women to contend and compete with and usually a man behind it all, a brute or sadist or bastard or some combination thereof. But what if there was a madness that needed no assist to descend, something more…organic, if you will. What if a woman went mad from within, after years of internalized emotional child abuse from an uncaring mother after an unwanted sexual experience, after decades of social conditioning right to a marriage that offered comfort and entirely too much time to let all the ingredients simmer together into something combustible. That’s pretty much Mrs. March’s tragic trajectory. The eponymous protagonist, the owner of the spiffy gloves on the cover, a woman who is a star of her own show to such an extent that her entire life is structured in a precisely performative way. Mrs. March’s greatest role is that of a wife to Mr. March, an acclaimed author and, with his latest book, the toast of the town. She is his wife, a mother of his child, a woman hosting his swanky soirees, a getter of his clean shirts, a manager of his maid, etc. So much so that she doesn’t even get a first name until the last page, her entire personality built around her marital title. Every action, every word…a finely tuned performance. A laborious difficult to sustain act. It’s no surprise it can’t last, but it’s the way it all goes off the rails that’ll have you absolutely riveted. This descent into madness is rendered with all the mesmerizing wrongness of a car crash magnetism. It’s a novel of a certain time and place, say 70s, when women roles in the society were defined with claustrophobic strictness, but not so much that there were no other options, which implies a certain complicity. For, just because Mrs. March was brought up to be a certain kind of a proper young lady, doesn’t mean she’s made no choices along the way. Once upon a time she was thrilled to bag the handsomest professor on campus. And she has enjoyed years of a certain quality of glitz on his arm and by his side. The toll it’s all has taken on her psyche is difficult to estimate, because she’s such a tightly held together character for so long and when she unravels, it’s a spectacular and dangerous mess. But it’s so good, it’s really good. This is for fans of Yellow Wallpaper, who thought the protagonist there was too likeable. You won’t have to deal with that here. There are virtually no likeable characters, but lately I’ve been finding a nice line up of books that are good enough to not need that easy attractor. Just terrible people doing terrible things to each other, with or without intent, sometimes just because they can’t help themselves, sometimes thoughtlessly and yes, sometimes with a frightening purpose. And of course, something they are just completely mad. You can make your own assessments of Mrs. March. She’d expect no less, being her own worst enemy and all that. And to think it all began with Mr. March’s new book and a character in it who everyone thinks must be based on his wife. And oh, did it snowball from there. Such small things, such careless acts… I was initially interested in this book after finding out that Elizabeth Moss optioned it for a movie, a Blumhouse movies no less. So reading it, she was impossible not to picture. And if the movie’s done right and taken seriously, this can be award material, finally, for an actress who very much deserves it. Not sure how she found this book, a random debut by a Spanish author and all that, but that’s a great find. And Moss, being easily one of the best actresses of her generation with incredible versatility and talent, is going to kill this one, appropriately enough. For now, though, it’s only in book form, you’ll have to use your imagination, though not too much, the author does a terrific job of bringing a cinematically vivid quality to it all by herself. Brain punch of a book. Must read for fans of dark psychological fiction. Recommended. Thanks Netgalley. ​This and more at https://advancetheplot.weebly.com/

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lormac

    This may be the worst book I have ever read. If not the worst, then definitely in the top three, and a real strong contender for the top spot. The protagonist, Mrs. March (more about the name later), is one of the most unlikeable characters ever written. She is shallow, overly concerned about appearances, hyper-critical of others, self-involved, and elitist. She is going insane, and while this should make the reader feel some sympathy towards her, she is SO unlikeable that this reader did not fee This may be the worst book I have ever read. If not the worst, then definitely in the top three, and a real strong contender for the top spot. The protagonist, Mrs. March (more about the name later), is one of the most unlikeable characters ever written. She is shallow, overly concerned about appearances, hyper-critical of others, self-involved, and elitist. She is going insane, and while this should make the reader feel some sympathy towards her, she is SO unlikeable that this reader did not feel sorry for her in the least - like one would feel about a cockroach set on its back in a bleach solution - sort of 'oh, well.'. She is married to a world famous novelist, lives on the Upper East Side, and has a 10 year old son who she really wishes would just get on with growing up and getting out of her life. She is also sweaty. Feito tells the reader at least two dozen times how Mrs. March is sweating, with rivulets of sweat running down her temples, dampening her underarms, pooling between her breasts. Ugh. But because Feito seems to have certain favorite words, I am not sure that this sweat thing is intentional or just the mark of a lazy writer. For example, there are at least seven separate references to macarons - Mrs. March is always buying macarons, eating macarons, serving macarons, or describing macarons as "pretty girls in their pastel colored dresses'. Except for one reference to strawberries and cream being served at a party, there are no other desserts in the Mrs. March universe - nary an eclair or a bowl of ice cream. Does Feito know that other pastries actually exist? The time period of this book is unknown. It does not seem that there are cellphones or Ubers in the Mrs. March world. But this is unclear too since there are references to certain current -day things such as marble-topped breakfast bars in kitchens with cove lighting, and athleisure garments, so again, I am left thinking that this non-time frame is not a conscious author decision, but just lazy writing. As for Mrs. March's name, she is never referred to by her first name until the last paragraph of the book. I have no idea what the point of this was supposed to be - is Feito somehow aiming for a "Rebecca" esque comparision? Is she trying to make Mrs. March an every-woman? Is she trying to say that Mrs. March is overly invested in her status as a married woman? Well, then, why tell us her first name at the end of the book? Was I supposed to be shocked? (Frankly, the name is somewhat old-fashioned but it is not something like Jezebel or Hezekiah or Ariadne which might have some symbolic significance.) This posing just seems pointless, like the whole book was. SPOILERS AHEAD: So, why did I continue reading, you may ask. Well, I kept thinking that there was going to be some plot pay-off at the end of the book. Mrs. March thinks her husband murdered a girl in backwoods Maine, and I thought that maybe Feito was going to have it turn out to be true, but when Mrs. March finds absolute proof , no one would believe her because she is insane. But nope. I also thought that the secret Mr. March was keeping with all his trips with his male book editor to backwoods Maine wasn't that he had murdered some local girl, but, rather, that he was having an affair with his editor. But nope. I also thought that maybe Mr. March was having an affair with the beautiful, young (non-sweaty) woman who he is flirting with at their holiday party, but nope, while he is having an affair, it is not with that woman. So, no pay-off at the end. Finally, the ending was particularly annoying. Yes, I knew that at one point Mrs. March was sleeping with a butcher knife under her pillow, but I figured that was for a night or two , not for months and months. For Pete's sake, she has a house-keeper who changes the sheets on her bed (this is specified at one point when Mrs March actually washes the sheets herself after urinating in the bed) so wouldn't the housekeeper have noticed the knife? By the way, how does she sleep anyway with a butcher knife under the pillow, and toss and turn all night, as Mrs. March is described as doing, without injuring herself?

  26. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Mrs March is married to bestselling author, George March, who she met while she was a student. George has a daughter, Paulette, from his previous marriage, who lives in London. Resentful of her stepdaughter, Mrs March has son Jonathan, now eight, an elegant apartment – complete with housekeeper – and enjoys the wealth and status that George’s career gives her. However, a chance remark in a bakery throws her existence into doubt. It is interesting that the book on Mrs March’s bedside table is “Reb Mrs March is married to bestselling author, George March, who she met while she was a student. George has a daughter, Paulette, from his previous marriage, who lives in London. Resentful of her stepdaughter, Mrs March has son Jonathan, now eight, an elegant apartment – complete with housekeeper – and enjoys the wealth and status that George’s career gives her. However, a chance remark in a bakery throws her existence into doubt. It is interesting that the book on Mrs March’s bedside table is “Rebecca,” as the leading character in this novel remains ‘Mrs March,’ defined by her marriage, her mother, and, as the novel unfolds, by her relationships to others, rather as herself. She is, undoubtedly, an unreliable narrator, but when she is asked whether the character in George March’s new novel is based on her, Mrs March is horrified. For the main character in her husbands latest, and very successful novel, is Johanna – wanton and unwanted. As we follow Mrs March on her descent into delusion, despair, and hysteria, we learn of how she met George, a promising author, considering the most attractive man on campus. How she listened to his ideas, acted as his sounding board, and supported him. Recently though, less interested, she has only skimmed the draft of his recent work and finds herself obsessed by this innocuous statement. Of course, once the statement has been made, Mrs March finds the book everywhere – in shopping trolleys, being read aloud in a restaurant, and she imagines that everyone is aware that she is Johanna and are sharing the joke. Looking for clues, Mrs March is even reduced to searching George’s study, where she comes across a news article on a missing woman close to a hunting lodge that George visits, which increases her suspicions about George’s motives and behaviour. This novel has some excellent scenes – I thought the party, near the beginning of the book, worked particularly well. Mrs March is obviously a damaged woman, and this is a disturbing novel. The author has been compared to some of my favourite writers, which I never think serves anybody well. The comparison is more in style, but much of this reminded me of Mrs Dalloway, with the snippets of Mrs March in a restaurant, department style, school office. I think this would be a good choice for reading groups, as there is a lot to explore. I received a copy of this book from the publisher, via NetGalley, for review.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kezia Duah

    Wow! this was a complicated read and very interesting. I was confused half of the time and wasn’t sure what direction this was going, but then that ending made everything make sense. It was like a switch. Excellent writing. Great job Feito! Favorite quotes: “Guilt was for the brave, denial was for the rest.” “You don’t want to trust your soul to others, because you’re embarrassed, filled with shame, so it’s grown deformed in the darkness inside you.”

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dallas Strawn

    A hotly buzzed about debut novel, I can see why Feito is getting the recognition she is for this one. I think Mrs. March had a pretty fascinating setup for a novel; a woman’s husband is a popular novelist and she starts hearing gossip in town that his new book has a main character that is based on her.... I don’t know if I liked the execution....some of the stylistic choices were a little odd, and did she really need to be referred to as “Mrs. March” on practically every page, idk. But. I liked i A hotly buzzed about debut novel, I can see why Feito is getting the recognition she is for this one. I think Mrs. March had a pretty fascinating setup for a novel; a woman’s husband is a popular novelist and she starts hearing gossip in town that his new book has a main character that is based on her.... I don’t know if I liked the execution....some of the stylistic choices were a little odd, and did she really need to be referred to as “Mrs. March” on practically every page, idk. But. I liked it. And the ending was wild. 🤷🏻‍♂️🤷🏻‍♂️ 4 ⭐️

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Woodbury

    3.5 stars. At first I was wondering if this was one of those "is this woman crazy or not?" books, which is not my favorite. (Thanks, I hate it.) But by the end I came to the conclusion that I was putting it in the wrong genre. This isn't a suspense novel where we wonder what really happened and what Mrs. March is just imagining, no this is a surreal fever dream. This is Woman in the Window meets Samantha Schweblin, if you want to put a mashup label on it. Mrs. March lives in... well it's definite 3.5 stars. At first I was wondering if this was one of those "is this woman crazy or not?" books, which is not my favorite. (Thanks, I hate it.) But by the end I came to the conclusion that I was putting it in the wrong genre. This isn't a suspense novel where we wonder what really happened and what Mrs. March is just imagining, no this is a surreal fever dream. This is Woman in the Window meets Samantha Schweblin, if you want to put a mashup label on it. Mrs. March lives in... well it's definitely New York City but it's not clear when. Could be the 50's or the 80's, she wears gloves but she also has a television with innumerable channels and a remote. This is one of your first clues that this isn't exactly reality, but an imaginary New York, one where a novelist lives in a big apartment and has a maid come 6 days a week, one where there are big parties with caterers and where people carry cigarette cases and wear fur coats. As for Mrs. March herself, well, we know a little about her childhood but otherwise she's mostly a cipher. It's unclear how she's functioned in the world for so long, but for now she is racked with social anxiety, especially after the release of her husband's celebrated new novel. This novel is about a terrible prostitute everyone hates (it's also a hugely successful novel, lol clearly a dream world) and Mrs. March is convinced everyone thinks it's about her. Slowly this builds from just social anxiety to something much deeper, where she is suspicious of everyone and everything. The summary refers to Highsmith and there's definitely a little of that here (especially Tom Ripley's not-quite-all-the-way-real world). Some readers will probably find this book pretty alienating since it's not rooted in reality, since we don't see a real fullness to Mrs. March as a character, but this is a book that is about "vibes" as it were, you just have to give yourself over to it. I did the audiobook and the narrator was a good fit.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Book of Secrets

    One-Sentence Summary: A wealthy New York housewife is horrified to learn that the pitiful protagonist of her husband's latest novel might be based on her. My Thoughts: This book was a strange experience! I'm not exactly sure when the the story is set, probably mid-20th century. I would describe MRS. MARCH as literary suspense, or maybe a character study of a woman's descent into madness. There's even a murder mystery mixed in. We only know the main character as "Mrs. March" until the very last se One-Sentence Summary: A wealthy New York housewife is horrified to learn that the pitiful protagonist of her husband's latest novel might be based on her. My Thoughts: This book was a strange experience! I'm not exactly sure when the the story is set, probably mid-20th century. I would describe MRS. MARCH as literary suspense, or maybe a character study of a woman's descent into madness. There's even a murder mystery mixed in. We only know the main character as "Mrs. March" until the very last sentence when her first name is revealed. I'm not sure I get the significance of that, still thinking it over. She's definitely unreliable and filled with inner turmoil, and her husband's new book sets her on a downward spiral. The writing was good, and I enjoyed the Shirley Jackson/Daphne du Maurier influence throughout. It's not exactly a fun read, but it did keep me glued to the pages. [3.5/5]

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