Hot Best Seller

The War of Jenkins' Ear: The Forgotten War for North and South America 1739-1748

Availability: Ready to download

Filled with unforgettable characters and maritime adventure, the incredible story of a forgotten war that shaped the fate of the United States—and the entire Western Hemisphere. In the early 18th century, the British and Spanish Empires were fighting for economic supremacy in the Americas.  Tensions between the two powers were high, and wars blossomed like violent flowers f Filled with unforgettable characters and maritime adventure, the incredible story of a forgotten war that shaped the fate of the United States—and the entire Western Hemisphere. In the early 18th century, the British and Spanish Empires were fighting for economic supremacy in the Americas.  Tensions between the two powers were high, and wars blossomed like violent flowers for nearly a hundred years, from the War of Spanish Succession (sometimes known as Queen Anne's War in the Americas), culminating in the War of Jenkins' Ear. This war would lay the groundwork for the French and Indian War and, eventually, the War of the American Revolution.  The War of Jenkins' Ear was a world war in the truest sense, engaging the major European powers on battlefields ranging from Europe to the Americas to the Asian subcontinent. Yet the conflict that would eventually become known as the War of Jenkins' Ear—a moniker coined by the 19th century historian Thomas Carlyle more than a century later—is barely known to us today.  Yet it resulted in the invasion of Georgia and even involved members of George Washington’s own family.  It would cost fifty-thousand lives, millions in treasure, and over six hundred ships. With vivid prose, Robert Gaudi takes the reader from the brackish waters of the Chesapeake Bay to the rocky shores of Tierra del Fuego.  We travel around the Cape of Good Hope and across the Pacific to the Philippines and the Cantonese coast, with stops in Cartagena, Panama, and beyond.  Yet even though it happened decades before American independence, The War of Jenkins' Ear reveals that this was truly an American war; a hard-fought, costly struggle that determined the fate of the Americas, and in which, for the first time, American armies participated.  In this definitive work of history—the only single comprehensive volume on the subject—The War of Jenkins’ Ear explores the war that established the future of two entire continents.


Compare

Filled with unforgettable characters and maritime adventure, the incredible story of a forgotten war that shaped the fate of the United States—and the entire Western Hemisphere. In the early 18th century, the British and Spanish Empires were fighting for economic supremacy in the Americas.  Tensions between the two powers were high, and wars blossomed like violent flowers f Filled with unforgettable characters and maritime adventure, the incredible story of a forgotten war that shaped the fate of the United States—and the entire Western Hemisphere. In the early 18th century, the British and Spanish Empires were fighting for economic supremacy in the Americas.  Tensions between the two powers were high, and wars blossomed like violent flowers for nearly a hundred years, from the War of Spanish Succession (sometimes known as Queen Anne's War in the Americas), culminating in the War of Jenkins' Ear. This war would lay the groundwork for the French and Indian War and, eventually, the War of the American Revolution.  The War of Jenkins' Ear was a world war in the truest sense, engaging the major European powers on battlefields ranging from Europe to the Americas to the Asian subcontinent. Yet the conflict that would eventually become known as the War of Jenkins' Ear—a moniker coined by the 19th century historian Thomas Carlyle more than a century later—is barely known to us today.  Yet it resulted in the invasion of Georgia and even involved members of George Washington’s own family.  It would cost fifty-thousand lives, millions in treasure, and over six hundred ships. With vivid prose, Robert Gaudi takes the reader from the brackish waters of the Chesapeake Bay to the rocky shores of Tierra del Fuego.  We travel around the Cape of Good Hope and across the Pacific to the Philippines and the Cantonese coast, with stops in Cartagena, Panama, and beyond.  Yet even though it happened decades before American independence, The War of Jenkins' Ear reveals that this was truly an American war; a hard-fought, costly struggle that determined the fate of the Americas, and in which, for the first time, American armies participated.  In this definitive work of history—the only single comprehensive volume on the subject—The War of Jenkins’ Ear explores the war that established the future of two entire continents.

30 review for The War of Jenkins' Ear: The Forgotten War for North and South America 1739-1748

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mike Stewart

    A lively, entertaining account of a war forgotten by almost everyone except history buffs and, in my case students of Florida history. Incidentally, Goodreads has the title wrong- the dates should be "1739-1742" not "1748". The War itself, one of many that wracked Europe in the 18th century, was fought in the Americas and was inconclusive; at its end very little had changed. Gaudi packs his narrative with all sorts of interesting details, e.g., an account of the castrati, the rock stars of the 1 A lively, entertaining account of a war forgotten by almost everyone except history buffs and, in my case students of Florida history. Incidentally, Goodreads has the title wrong- the dates should be "1739-1742" not "1748". The War itself, one of many that wracked Europe in the 18th century, was fought in the Americas and was inconclusive; at its end very little had changed. Gaudi packs his narrative with all sorts of interesting details, e.g., an account of the castrati, the rock stars of the 18th century. His history is well-organized, populated with fascinating characters, and told with verve and wit. Even the general reader, with little interest in the topic, would find it enjoyable. Now for the nit-picking: The War of Jenkins' Ear is also beset with some sloppy editing, a phenomenon that seems to be on the rise and was rare up until the past 20 years ago. I noted occasional typos grammatical faux pas, sentence fragments, names of ship not italicized, etc. What was more concerning was the chronology for the Castillo de San Marcos. The fort was built between 1672 and 1695. According to Gaudi's text, construction began in 1695 and went on for 22 year - the 22 years is correct- but was first besieged in 1689, six years before the text says construction began! A minimally competent editor should have caught this. A word about the maps: The end papers feature an excellent modern map of Florida and Georgia in 1735 which is helpful. For some reason, however, Fort Mose is identified as "Fort Moosa." Gaudi always refers to it as "Fort Mose". The text and the map should be in agreement. There is also an inset map of the Savannah River and its tributaries - nice, but has practically nothing to do with the text. The modern maps of the St. Augustine campaign and siege are excellent. The failed British assault on Cartagena is the most significant battle of the war. Instead of a modern map, the editors include a contemporary map that is so poorly reproduced as to be useless. Last of all, a map of the Caribbean would have been most helpful. Apparently, not enough thought was given to which maps would be of use to the reader.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Mark Luongo

    "The War of Jenkins' Ear", how can you not be intrigued with a title like that? Have always heard about it in the course of my studies over the years but never actually knew any of the details. A relatively minor conflict but with ramifications that went far beyond its outcome. A rapidly declining Spanish empire, a disastrous investment scheme, a Royal Navy coming in to its own but struggling with it's Army counterparts, depredations against merchant shipping (hence Captain Jenkins' missing ear), "The War of Jenkins' Ear", how can you not be intrigued with a title like that? Have always heard about it in the course of my studies over the years but never actually knew any of the details. A relatively minor conflict but with ramifications that went far beyond its outcome. A rapidly declining Spanish empire, a disastrous investment scheme, a Royal Navy coming in to its own but struggling with it's Army counterparts, depredations against merchant shipping (hence Captain Jenkins' missing ear), Americans abroad and at war for the first time (and getting no respect) and a cast of characters that boggle the mind. Captain Lawrence Washington of Virginia, older brother of George, decorated for bravery in action against the Spanish and earning a citation from Admiral Edward Vernon, whom Washington later named his home after. Vernon daring to challenge the slow monotony and delay of the army so as to avoid the rains and disease in the tropics that so debilitated soldiers and sailors alike. Disease was the great killer of this war. James Oglethorpe. Frankly, I knew him as the founder of the colony of Georgia but learned he was much more than that. The author describes him as "founder, philanthropist, social reformer, anti-slavery activist, soldier and visionary." Interesting. Don Blas de Lezo, defender of Cartagena. One-armed, one-legged and missing an eye. That about says it all for this determined and courageous Spaniard. On the other side, Captain Charles Knowles. A competent, controversial naval officer, engineer, royal governor, author of strongly worded pamphlets, scientist and inventor

  3. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    This got a good review in the Washington Post and so my sister bought it and then she passed it on to me. It is a very readable history about a time in history that I did not know much about. I had heard of the War of Jenkins' Ear (with a name like that, it's hard not to notice) but I knew nothing about it, even the time period which was from 1739-1742. Basically, a war between England and Spain, it was England's last real chance to win the Spanish colonies in the Caribbean and South and Centra This got a good review in the Washington Post and so my sister bought it and then she passed it on to me. It is a very readable history about a time in history that I did not know much about. I had heard of the War of Jenkins' Ear (with a name like that, it's hard not to notice) but I knew nothing about it, even the time period which was from 1739-1742. Basically, a war between England and Spain, it was England's last real chance to win the Spanish colonies in the Caribbean and South and Central America and bring them under their influence. It didn't succeed but Spain also wasn't able to win the new colony of Georgia and increase their hold in North America. I learned a lot especially about Admiral Vernon and Lawrence Washington who served with him and named his estate -- left to his little brother George -- Mt. Vernon!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rob Roy

    This book follows the people and events of the most oddly named war in history. The events of this war are fascinating, and Admiral Vernon and James Oglethorpe stand out for their courage and tenacity. General Wentworth also stands out and is a clear example of how not to lead. The man was slower than McClellan. This book is filled with detail, and sometimes, too much detail, but it gives you a good in-depth understanding of the war, its battles, and those in charge. Far from England’s finest ho This book follows the people and events of the most oddly named war in history. The events of this war are fascinating, and Admiral Vernon and James Oglethorpe stand out for their courage and tenacity. General Wentworth also stands out and is a clear example of how not to lead. The man was slower than McClellan. This book is filled with detail, and sometimes, too much detail, but it gives you a good in-depth understanding of the war, its battles, and those in charge. Far from England’s finest hour, but maybe Vernon is one of its finest Naval leaders.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Steven Hix

    It’s an accessible yet detailed book about a specific historical event that gives just enough color and background to let you appreciate each moment but not so much to take you out of it. It seems like finding that balance is often the hardest part of writing historical books, and this one knocked it out of the park. I enjoyed the book immensely in a lot of ways, but if the author uses Goodreads, please hear our plea to hire a new copy editor

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Gorshe

    This is a fascinating read about the people leading naval fights over the New World between England and Spain providing roots of the American Revolution and fun facts including explaining how Mt Vernon was named. Reading this while traveling between St. Augustine and Ruatan is so stimulating. This is a study of human nature as well as what was lacking before public health!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Haroon Majoka

    Nice book

  8. 4 out of 5

    Willie Kirschner

    An interesting story about a time in history which is not understood and it provides insight into why Washington’s home was named Mount Vernon. Also teaches about the role chance plays in history.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kirk

    A bit tedious in the details, but an interesting bit of history and why countries go to war.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Farabaugh

    This was an enjoyable and well written account of a mostly forgotten war. The people are well described and the action moves.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Roy Carrillo

    Seems like a great time period

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mackay

    Of two minds about this book... On the one side, a necessary topic to highlight forgotten but crucial events that shaped the Western world, including the area that eventually became the infant United States. One the other side, a narrative that sometimes feels lost in the weeds, and one that is horrendously marred by, once again, impossibly bad copy editing. It's bad enough to run into these issues in a quickly written, meant-for-the-moment genre novel; to have such slipshod work affect a piece of Of two minds about this book... On the one side, a necessary topic to highlight forgotten but crucial events that shaped the Western world, including the area that eventually became the infant United States. One the other side, a narrative that sometimes feels lost in the weeds, and one that is horrendously marred by, once again, impossibly bad copy editing. It's bad enough to run into these issues in a quickly written, meant-for-the-moment genre novel; to have such slipshod work affect a piece of important scholarship is unforgivable. And yes, I cannot help that sloppy book production affects my reaction to the contents, for such problems always lead to the deeper question: if the language is off, is the scholarship?

  13. 4 out of 5

    Adam Mathers

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

  15. 5 out of 5

    Janice Thompson

  16. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  17. 4 out of 5

    YiYang

  18. 5 out of 5

    John Hamilton

  19. 4 out of 5

    JEFF SPETMAN

  20. 5 out of 5

    Steve

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jay

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sofia

  23. 5 out of 5

    George Dubyak

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ben

  25. 4 out of 5

    Colette

  26. 5 out of 5

    Stuart

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jason L Turbyfill

  28. 4 out of 5

    Richard

  29. 4 out of 5

    David Brown

  30. 4 out of 5

    Wayne McDaniel

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.