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The Wolftime

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Dawn of Fire book 3 Book three spins the saga of the Space Wolves as they stand against rampaging xenos hordes. Logan Grimnar faces a momentous decision that will impact the future of the chapter itself. READ IT BECAUSE Discover how the Cicatrix Maledictum affects even the most stubborn and steadfast of the Imperium’s warriors, as traditions the Space Wolves hold dear may be Dawn of Fire book 3 Book three spins the saga of the Space Wolves as they stand against rampaging xenos hordes. Logan Grimnar faces a momentous decision that will impact the future of the chapter itself. READ IT BECAUSE Discover how the Cicatrix Maledictum affects even the most stubborn and steadfast of the Imperium’s warriors, as traditions the Space Wolves hold dear may be stopping them from defending the Imperium to the best of their abilities. THE STORY The Indomitus Crusade has brought the Emperor's vengeance to thousands of star systems. The fleets and armies under the leadership of Roboute Guilliman fight for the survival of humanity against the forces of the Chaos Gods. But the traitors and heretics are not the only foe looking to destroy the rule of Terra. Xenos prey on human worlds in numbers not seen for millennia. Worst amongst them are the rampaging orks, whose migration conquests threaten to reverse the many gains of Fleet Primus. And their throaty bellows carry a name not heard in years, of destruction made flesh, a bestial warlord without peer: Ghazghkull Mag Uruk Thraka. In the midst of this brutal tide is Fenris, the world of the Space Wolves. Depleted by ever-greater demands on their warriors, called upon by the Legion-breaker Guilliman, the Wolves of Fenris face a momentous decision. Grimnar and his counsellors must choose whether their fate is to ally themselves with an ancient rival and risk all that makes them the Vlka Fenryka or to accept their demise and wait for the return of their own primarch and the coming of the Wolftime.


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Dawn of Fire book 3 Book three spins the saga of the Space Wolves as they stand against rampaging xenos hordes. Logan Grimnar faces a momentous decision that will impact the future of the chapter itself. READ IT BECAUSE Discover how the Cicatrix Maledictum affects even the most stubborn and steadfast of the Imperium’s warriors, as traditions the Space Wolves hold dear may be Dawn of Fire book 3 Book three spins the saga of the Space Wolves as they stand against rampaging xenos hordes. Logan Grimnar faces a momentous decision that will impact the future of the chapter itself. READ IT BECAUSE Discover how the Cicatrix Maledictum affects even the most stubborn and steadfast of the Imperium’s warriors, as traditions the Space Wolves hold dear may be stopping them from defending the Imperium to the best of their abilities. THE STORY The Indomitus Crusade has brought the Emperor's vengeance to thousands of star systems. The fleets and armies under the leadership of Roboute Guilliman fight for the survival of humanity against the forces of the Chaos Gods. But the traitors and heretics are not the only foe looking to destroy the rule of Terra. Xenos prey on human worlds in numbers not seen for millennia. Worst amongst them are the rampaging orks, whose migration conquests threaten to reverse the many gains of Fleet Primus. And their throaty bellows carry a name not heard in years, of destruction made flesh, a bestial warlord without peer: Ghazghkull Mag Uruk Thraka. In the midst of this brutal tide is Fenris, the world of the Space Wolves. Depleted by ever-greater demands on their warriors, called upon by the Legion-breaker Guilliman, the Wolves of Fenris face a momentous decision. Grimnar and his counsellors must choose whether their fate is to ally themselves with an ancient rival and risk all that makes them the Vlka Fenryka or to accept their demise and wait for the return of their own primarch and the coming of the Wolftime.

30 review for The Wolftime

  1. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    This is the first of the Dawn of Fire books that really felt bogged down by needing to cover so many aspects of the Indomitus Crusade. I think part of the problem in that, however, is that most of our viewpoints barely advance the plot and so things feel stretched very thin by the end. Overall, I liked aspects of this more than I liked it as a whole. Some minor plot spoilers below: (view spoiler)[ The story of Gaius trying to integrate himself into the Space Wolves as a Primaris Son of Russ is gre This is the first of the Dawn of Fire books that really felt bogged down by needing to cover so many aspects of the Indomitus Crusade. I think part of the problem in that, however, is that most of our viewpoints barely advance the plot and so things feel stretched very thin by the end. Overall, I liked aspects of this more than I liked it as a whole. Some minor plot spoilers below: (view spoiler)[ The story of Gaius trying to integrate himself into the Space Wolves as a Primaris Son of Russ is great (Even if it occasionally feels like a rehash of the William King Space Wolves books towards the end) and I would have been happy to read this story alone if it were expanded into it's own book. The subplots tied into his story were also interesting and, again, would have been a great subplot for a single story tying Gaius to Fenris. Unfortunately, it's a bit lost at first in the larger book. Spending time with the big names of the Space Wolves was interesting at first, but ultimately felt bogged down by the fact that they weren't doing anything other than turning their nose up at Guilliman's reinforcements and wandering the Aett crying about it being The Wolftime. The Space Wolves can be fantastic and I love insights into their culture, but as a part of this book this largely felt like it didn't do much for them. That said, Njal was really interesting to follow and I hope we see more of his journey set up here somewhere else. On the flip side, I haven't perhaps read everything Space Wolves related, but I found Bjorn really out of character here from the usually well spoken, but terrifyingly powerful Dreadnought. He really just shows up to say how much he thinks Guilliman sucks and that it. Maybe they roused him on the wrong side of the ancient casket that day. For the other plot threads, the historitor stuff continues the story of the last book a bit and I like Vychellan. Colquan is a raging arsehole as usual and it's really taken to the extreme in this book to the point where I really wanted to skim scenes he was featured in since I knew he'd just continue to be a jerk. Largely the rest of the book is setup for future plotlines that will hopefully be more interesting than the setup we see here, because they were largely not worth noting. (hide spoiler)]

  2. 4 out of 5

    AA_Logan

    I’ll be honest, I struggled with the first quarter or so of this book- the book took me more than a month to read rather than my usual day or two. It might have been down to me rather than the quality of the novel, since I tore through it once I got going though, it’s one of Thorpe’s best. On the surface it’s about the integration of Primaris marines into the Space Wolves and the response to the increasing ork threat in the wake of the Great Rift opening, but it’s so much more than that. Ferris I I’ll be honest, I struggled with the first quarter or so of this book- the book took me more than a month to read rather than my usual day or two. It might have been down to me rather than the quality of the novel, since I tore through it once I got going though, it’s one of Thorpe’s best. On the surface it’s about the integration of Primaris marines into the Space Wolves and the response to the increasing ork threat in the wake of the Great Rift opening, but it’s so much more than that. Ferris Ian culture is one of the most deeply mined in 40K, but this is an exploration of that as good as you find in the original Space Wolves novels by Bill King or Chris Wraight’s later works. Through the enthusiastic eyes of Gaius we see the Space Wolves as he first learns of the chapter to reality of his first encounters with his gene-kin. His story consciously mirrors the earlier Space Wolves stories and builds upon them. Like the other Dawn of Fire books to date we also consider the nature of life the Imperium from so many new perspectives and weigh up it’s morality. While the book doesn’t have the big revelation some thought the title suggested, it does contain some interesting pointers to the future narrative of 40K.

  3. 5 out of 5

    William Adams

    Who keeps letting Gav Thorpe write books?

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michael Haspil

    Good Space Wolves novel. Seemed a little disjointed at the start but it all comes together in the end. Really finds its legs when Gaius gets to Fenris.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chris Dennison

    Gav Thorpe does to the Space Wolves what he’s been doing to the Dark Angels for years! This was almost a 4 star rating book. The book is well written as always by Thorpe, and the story was enjoyable enough despite the misleading title. However the author has managed to make the Space Wolves appear foolish through most of the book by continually making decisions that are akin to them cutting off their noses to spite their faces! The Space wolves are independent. We get it. They are not stupid. On Gav Thorpe does to the Space Wolves what he’s been doing to the Dark Angels for years! This was almost a 4 star rating book. The book is well written as always by Thorpe, and the story was enjoyable enough despite the misleading title. However the author has managed to make the Space Wolves appear foolish through most of the book by continually making decisions that are akin to them cutting off their noses to spite their faces! The Space wolves are independent. We get it. They are not stupid. On the cusp of extinction they make poor decisions time and time again in a bid to uphold that independence. I understand he need to build in conflict into a story but the path Thorpe chooses to tread just makes Logan Grimnar, a well respected and loved character appear weak and argumentative for the sake of it. I can’t help but feel this story could have been told better which is a shame. Despite this it is still worth a read if only because it adds some context to the events of the previous book in the series and starts to make the Dawn of fire series feel a little more cohesive.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kingsley Houston

    I think there's a good novella buried in there, but as it is it manages to feel bloated an underwritten at the same time. Structurally is a bit of a mess, with many parallel side stories, which barely interact with the main plot, and it chops back and forth between them far too much in the early chapters, so you barely get any time with the main story. The story of Gaius, a Space Wolves unnumbered son, learning the ways of Fenris is the heart of the novel, but doesn't really get the focus until I think there's a good novella buried in there, but as it is it manages to feel bloated an underwritten at the same time. Structurally is a bit of a mess, with many parallel side stories, which barely interact with the main plot, and it chops back and forth between them far too much in the early chapters, so you barely get any time with the main story. The story of Gaius, a Space Wolves unnumbered son, learning the ways of Fenris is the heart of the novel, but doesn't really get the focus until the last third of the book. I think this story on its own would have been pretty satisfying, but it's doled out in little chunks early on and the other stories are much less engaging. The politics of Fenris take up way too much of the limelight, and it seems like the same characters have the same conversations several times, without any growth until everything gets very suddenly resolved at the end. There is also a story line about the crusade and the historiters, which has a lot of focus, but seems like it was cut short, with a jump forward in the timeline at the end. It really feels like it's setting up something to happen to that group of characters, but then the next time you see them they just make a quick reference to what happened and the story ends. I wouldn't recommend reading this book, unless you could manage to only read the sections with Gaius and Ghita and skip the rest. Unfortunately that's not so simple because each chapter has a bit of 2 to 4 subplots in it, so you might struggle to find the relevant sections.

  7. 4 out of 5

    James Green

    Guilliman's Indomitus Crusade has broken out into the galaxy and is pushing back the archenemy and reconnecting with worlds, at least on this side of the Great Rift. But he's come up against his great opposition so far... the Great Wolf of Fenris. Logan Grimnar is the Chapter Master of the Space Wolves chapter. While he's totally loyal to the Imperium he does not trust Guilliman known to the Wolves as 'the Legion Breaker' and who's claiming of the the regency has echoes of the Warmaster and the Guilliman's Indomitus Crusade has broken out into the galaxy and is pushing back the archenemy and reconnecting with worlds, at least on this side of the Great Rift. But he's come up against his great opposition so far... the Great Wolf of Fenris. Logan Grimnar is the Chapter Master of the Space Wolves chapter. While he's totally loyal to the Imperium he does not trust Guilliman known to the Wolves as 'the Legion Breaker' and who's claiming of the the regency has echoes of the Warmaster and the Hersey. Can the Primarch convince the Wolves to take their Primarius reinforcemets and of his good intentions before they wipe themselves out facing resurgent Ork forces. Another solid entry into this series. You've got the slow burning story of Historitors and the crusade in general which weaves through the whole series. Then there is a great story about Gaius a Primarius marine of Russ's bloodline who needs to prove himself to his new chapter brothers. Then there is Geeta, a tribeswoman of Fenris, who has a vision she need the wolves to hear. If only she can cross the Death world she lives on to tell them.

  8. 5 out of 5

    David

    I honestly could not read much of The Wolftime in one sitting. The amount of “wolfisms” in this book was just too high for my taste. I believe Mr. Thorpe was teething to appeal to a specific audience - namely space wolf fans - while leaving the rest of us out in the cold (no pun intended). I didn’t find the characters’ motivations to be sensible and the pace of the story was jarring, jumping forward and backward in time and place. I found myself looking forward to Gytha and Guilliman’s stories t I honestly could not read much of The Wolftime in one sitting. The amount of “wolfisms” in this book was just too high for my taste. I believe Mr. Thorpe was teething to appeal to a specific audience - namely space wolf fans - while leaving the rest of us out in the cold (no pun intended). I didn’t find the characters’ motivations to be sensible and the pace of the story was jarring, jumping forward and backward in time and place. I found myself looking forward to Gytha and Guilliman’s stories the most, and coming to dread the parts of the book in which characters had to interact with the Sky Warriors of Fenris. The dialogue and descriptions provided in these portions of the book were enough to ruin my suspension of disbelief and totally remove me from the story.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Gary

    An up to date look into the space wolves This was a surprise for me, I'm not the biggest fan of Gav Thorpe however he has managed to not only capture the spirit of Fenris so well but also brings a fascinating in depth look into how the space wolves of old view the re-emergence of a Primarch and his gift of the Primaris marines. Great story telling, compelling lead characters and a fantastic continuation of th Dawn of Fire arch. Only downside for me was the action scenes, they felt a little flat. An up to date look into the space wolves This was a surprise for me, I'm not the biggest fan of Gav Thorpe however he has managed to not only capture the spirit of Fenris so well but also brings a fascinating in depth look into how the space wolves of old view the re-emergence of a Primarch and his gift of the Primaris marines. Great story telling, compelling lead characters and a fantastic continuation of th Dawn of Fire arch. Only downside for me was the action scenes, they felt a little flat. Actually to be fair the action on Fenris worked but the space hulk sections did not. Overall great story and a welcome addition to the Dawn of Fire series

  10. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    Probably the best entry in the Dawn of Fire series so far. I had seen a few complaints before I read regarding the Space Wolves differing vocabulary but it is still a hundred times less complicated than the language used in A Clockwork Orange, and for the rare cases where context is not enough to discern what they are saying, there is a guide in the back. The story itself is interesting across most of the characters, and for the first time you really get to see the divide in a Chapter as Firstbo Probably the best entry in the Dawn of Fire series so far. I had seen a few complaints before I read regarding the Space Wolves differing vocabulary but it is still a hundred times less complicated than the language used in A Clockwork Orange, and for the rare cases where context is not enough to discern what they are saying, there is a guide in the back. The story itself is interesting across most of the characters, and for the first time you really get to see the divide in a Chapter as Firstborn Marines grapple with the impending inclusion and possible replacement by Primaris. Some of the characters are stupidly stubborn, but it isn't out of character for any of them. Quality read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    JAMES AMOR

    Primaris Wolves Enough Said Finally a future for the sons of russ to prosper and grow. Momentous 40k history is made in this book. The fact the wolves can finally create successor chapters and blend there uniqueness and strength with primaris enhancement and assets biological and technological is nothing short of a game changer for the empire of mankind. I've read the plague wars and three of the dawn of fire novels I've downloaded the fourth dawn of fire novel and will start devouring it after I Primaris Wolves Enough Said Finally a future for the sons of russ to prosper and grow. Momentous 40k history is made in this book. The fact the wolves can finally create successor chapters and blend there uniqueness and strength with primaris enhancement and assets biological and technological is nothing short of a game changer for the empire of mankind. I've read the plague wars and three of the dawn of fire novels I've downloaded the fourth dawn of fire novel and will start devouring it after I've finished this review. The indomitus crusade books and lore has revitalised the 40k universe for me and so many other warhammer lovers thankyou.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Wake

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Some very interesting ideas of identity and integration within the space marines chapters for the new Primaris Marines are explored. There is a nice continuation of the Historitors storyline, and some additional world building occurs. However, it largely feels as though there is no real progress with the overarching Indomitus Crusade storyline. The pace, at times, feels slow and we get bogged down with moments and characters that in the end have little to do with the main series narrative. It does Some very interesting ideas of identity and integration within the space marines chapters for the new Primaris Marines are explored. There is a nice continuation of the Historitors storyline, and some additional world building occurs. However, it largely feels as though there is no real progress with the overarching Indomitus Crusade storyline. The pace, at times, feels slow and we get bogged down with moments and characters that in the end have little to do with the main series narrative. It does however give great detail and character for the Space Wolves, their culture, language and history, and how they are faring in this time. Well worth the read if you stick with it!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Christian

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was an excellent update of the Space Wolves’ place in the unfolding setting. It highlighted the good and bad parts of the Vlka Fenryka: strength, stubbornness, and tradition. The characters, pace, and plot were very compelling and I hope to read about the mortals in the future. Colquan knows about the Unremembered Empire!

  14. 5 out of 5

    CozyCharles

    Solid effort, I don't particularly like the Space Wolves but this was a decent read. Only brought down by knowing that the Big Bad doesn't make an appearance and the clash that's being set up here takes place in a campaign book rather than a novel. Preferred this to Indomitus so at least I know it's not Gav's writing I dislike. Solid effort, I don't particularly like the Space Wolves but this was a decent read. Only brought down by knowing that the Big Bad doesn't make an appearance and the clash that's being set up here takes place in a campaign book rather than a novel. Preferred this to Indomitus so at least I know it's not Gav's writing I dislike.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Michael Knolla

    I was surprised that despite the solution to the central problem being obvious from the earliest chapters I really enjoyed the journey to it. Good introduction to the main Space Wolves (sorry, they prefer to be called the Wolves of Fenris…) for new readers. And despite being book 3 in a series made for a more than enjoyable stand alone read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Peel

    Another one that shows how much Black Library are crying out for a decent Editor in Chief. The book is severely bloated. The stories in the book are decent-there are several of them-they just suffer from an over flowery style and this isn’t the first of Gav Thorpe’s offences in this department. The First Wall had exactly the same problem.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kaedon Smith

    Awesome This was one of the better warhammer books I’ve read in awhile. The story was great as were the number of pages and price which really shocked me. Awesome book! Wish there was a follow up for the wolves because I would happily read more story’s about Gauis and his journey after the end of the book

  18. 4 out of 5

    Alpharius(Possibly)

    Meh. Not bad by any accounts but it seems uninspiring compared to the other two. Also it needed some more work in the editing room, with a particularly glaring example towards the end of the book. Despite this there are some entertaining moments, especially towards the end.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michael Strickler

    Ties into the Dawn of Fire series, but doesn't 'conclude' it... Great insight to Fenrisian customs and language. Not a lot of galactic action, but worth it for fans of the Space Wolves especially. Ties into the Dawn of Fire series, but doesn't 'conclude' it... Great insight to Fenrisian customs and language. Not a lot of galactic action, but worth it for fans of the Space Wolves especially.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jack Neighbour

    Fantastic read. Made me buy some space wolves!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Derek R Mitch

    Meh Came for a warhammer book, but this was half filled with a story of life on Ferris. That part was pretty boring. Not one of the better 40k books.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kavinay

    +1 for emo-Space Wolves swearing

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jay

    The Wolftime is a great book, very enjoyable. It sets up and contextualises both the Saga of the Beast and some of the psychic awakening lore.

  24. 5 out of 5

    untitled lullaby

    I had fun reading this to my husband it doesn’t matter how many times we wanted to punch the great wolf.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Joe Snider

    Gives some flavor to the Space Wolves' acceptance of the primaris. Really brought us into the heads of the chapter. Gives some flavor to the Space Wolves' acceptance of the primaris. Really brought us into the heads of the chapter.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Zeki Czen

    Good novel for characterization but doesnt really advance the overall story line

  27. 4 out of 5

    Zoyd Wheeler

    Lame at times. Would have made a great novella.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Meh. Competent enough. Feel a bit cheated that Leman Russ doesn't actually ever show up. Meh. Competent enough. Feel a bit cheated that Leman Russ doesn't actually ever show up.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hampu

  30. 5 out of 5

    Beekay

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