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Women, Work & the Art of Savoir Faire: Business Sense & Sensibility

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From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of French Women Don't Get Fat comes every woman's guide to navigating the world of work, living the good life, and savoring every minute of it. When Mireille Guiliano became a senior executive and spokesperson for Veuve Clicquot, she took the Champagne to the top of the luxury market, using her distinctive French woman's philoso From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of French Women Don't Get Fat comes every woman's guide to navigating the world of work, living the good life, and savoring every minute of it. When Mireille Guiliano became a senior executive and spokesperson for Veuve Clicquot, she took the Champagne to the top of the luxury market, using her distinctive French woman's philosophy and style. Now she uses those same talents and savoir faire to help readers pop their own corks and get the mostout of life. Drawing on her experiences at the front lines and highest echelons of the business world, she gives women (and a few men, peut-être) the practical advice they need to make the most of work without skimping on all the other good things in life.With lively lessons, stories, and helpful hints, Mireille teaches every reader how to identify her own passions and talents, improve her communication skills, balance work and life, cope with everyday stress, turn herself into a winning brand, and so much more. From acing a job interview or performance review to hosting a simple but elegant dinner party, Mireille tells it like it is as she shares her secrets for achieving happiness and success at any stage in business and life.Stylish, witty, and wise, Mireille segues easily from the small details to the big picture, never losing sight of what is most important: feeling good, facing challenges, getting ahead, and maximizing pleasure at every opportunity.


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From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of French Women Don't Get Fat comes every woman's guide to navigating the world of work, living the good life, and savoring every minute of it. When Mireille Guiliano became a senior executive and spokesperson for Veuve Clicquot, she took the Champagne to the top of the luxury market, using her distinctive French woman's philoso From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of French Women Don't Get Fat comes every woman's guide to navigating the world of work, living the good life, and savoring every minute of it. When Mireille Guiliano became a senior executive and spokesperson for Veuve Clicquot, she took the Champagne to the top of the luxury market, using her distinctive French woman's philosophy and style. Now she uses those same talents and savoir faire to help readers pop their own corks and get the mostout of life. Drawing on her experiences at the front lines and highest echelons of the business world, she gives women (and a few men, peut-être) the practical advice they need to make the most of work without skimping on all the other good things in life.With lively lessons, stories, and helpful hints, Mireille teaches every reader how to identify her own passions and talents, improve her communication skills, balance work and life, cope with everyday stress, turn herself into a winning brand, and so much more. From acing a job interview or performance review to hosting a simple but elegant dinner party, Mireille tells it like it is as she shares her secrets for achieving happiness and success at any stage in business and life.Stylish, witty, and wise, Mireille segues easily from the small details to the big picture, never losing sight of what is most important: feeling good, facing challenges, getting ahead, and maximizing pleasure at every opportunity.

30 review for Women, Work & the Art of Savoir Faire: Business Sense & Sensibility

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bibi

    This was a gift from a dear friend and although it wasn't revolutionary in its approach or content; still, it provides invaluable insight into Guilliano's leadership and mentorship footprints in the corporate landscape, which is both instructive and laudable. Enjoyable read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I was not sure what to expect with this book, as I received it as a gift. It claims to offer practical advice, but what the author presents feels mostly irrelevant in the specifics to most working women. The author inhabits the world as a successful author and champagne executive. Also, she seemingly attributes all of her success to speaking English with a French accent.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    I was excited to read "words of wisdom" from a successful businesswoman. I found the book to be trite and she seemed so full of herself I was unable to finish it. She also injects all these cutsie French phrases in that made me want to throw up.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Devon

    Wanting to read yet another business book, I wanted to find something crisp, intelligent, sassy and a little focused on the ladies. Then, I found this: Mireille Guiliano's "Women, Work and the Art of Savoir Faire." A witty, chic, stylistic tip-book of sorts on how to navigate the business world from stilettos. Guiliano's style of writing is so sincere and so down to earth, you'd think you were best girlfriends for years. Her ideas of life happening in stages and taking calculated risks at the righ Wanting to read yet another business book, I wanted to find something crisp, intelligent, sassy and a little focused on the ladies. Then, I found this: Mireille Guiliano's "Women, Work and the Art of Savoir Faire." A witty, chic, stylistic tip-book of sorts on how to navigate the business world from stilettos. Guiliano's style of writing is so sincere and so down to earth, you'd think you were best girlfriends for years. Her ideas of life happening in stages and taking calculated risks at the right times aren't groundbreaking, but they are put in a way that is both engaging and thought-provoking. She goes over everything from how to give a good presentation, to traveling alone as a woman, to what to make on your menu when entertaining business guests at home. There is something for everyone (and everything for anybody) in this book. I absolutely loved it! Here's a small excerpt: "What I have tried to write is the sort of book I wish I had been given when starting out in the working world and had a hand along the way. This isn't another business book that tells you how to 'succeed' or 'get the corner office.' Yes, of course, you'll find advice on getting ahead and getting promoted...but more than that, you'll find advice on being happy and living a good life, even while you are making the biggest contribution you can to the workplace. That's why I dare to talk about style and clothes and food and wine and entertaining and LIFE in a business book. We don't work in a vacuum. Our work is part of the rest of our lives." Recommended for anyone woman, in the business arena or not, looking for just a little life-guidance. I know I learned so much from Guiliano. She's a treasure!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Not a book I would recommend. The author's self-centered, over developed sense of ego is overbearing to the message. She writes with a style that her way is the only way. Also, when giving examples she always says, "I", "I", "I". There are never positive team examples, only highlights things her team did wrong and how she saved the day. Also, the entire book reads like an endorsement for her champagne company. There are better books to gain the same message so steer clear of this one.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Terri

    This book begins well. Mireille Guiliano lets you know that she has the portfolio to be able to hand out advice. As a French woman in New York, her accent and obvious ability to speak French and English well, made her a desirable candidate for a terrific job, selling French champagne to the American public. And she excelled. A lot of Guiliano's advice seems facile but in this day when some hopeful job applicants don't know to change out of their jeans and flip flops and strapless tops for an inte This book begins well. Mireille Guiliano lets you know that she has the portfolio to be able to hand out advice. As a French woman in New York, her accent and obvious ability to speak French and English well, made her a desirable candidate for a terrific job, selling French champagne to the American public. And she excelled. A lot of Guiliano's advice seems facile but in this day when some hopeful job applicants don't know to change out of their jeans and flip flops and strapless tops for an interview; it is time to go back to basics : "Don't overdo your eyes with make up." Or, "The quality that sets people apart in business is the ability to communicate orally, in large and small settings." Or, "Before going to bed, decide mentally or physically what you are going to wear in the morning." This book would be a great boon for a young person without any experience in life or the job market, someone who needs to be told the obvious by a woman who was willing to write it all down in book form. For the woman who has been in the work world for some time, this book will be clearly stating the obvious. And at the risk of getting nothing but negative feedback, I did tire of Mireille Guiliano tooting her own horn throughout the entire book. And goodness gracious, if you are not French, well then, just stand to the back, please, and make way for that marvelous lot of people, The French!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    A wonderful book on all aspects of women in business. Mireille Guiliano acknowledges and addresses differences between men and women in work without any kind of political agenda - which I loved. I wanted to recommend this book to all the people I took a library management class with last semester - men and women.

  8. 5 out of 5

    C

    Maybe it's because I read the reviews before I actually read the book, but I started out feeling very skeptical about this title. As I finished reading it and was able to spend some time reflecting, I realized that I didn't dislike it as I thought I would. I'm also quite certain that if I were to meet the author she'd likely both terrify and completely captivate me. I'm writing this review from the perspective of someone who operates in a world that is in many ways very different from Mireille Gu Maybe it's because I read the reviews before I actually read the book, but I started out feeling very skeptical about this title. As I finished reading it and was able to spend some time reflecting, I realized that I didn't dislike it as I thought I would. I'm also quite certain that if I were to meet the author she'd likely both terrify and completely captivate me. I'm writing this review from the perspective of someone who operates in a world that is in many ways very different from Mireille Guiliano's. I shy away from the big-city lifestyle that the author appears to thrive in and my career most certainly won't be built on entertaining for a living. I can still find value in the author's tale of success as a career woman, but I wonder if some of the negative reviews this book gets is because Mireille Guiliano clearly lives--and thrives--in a different world than a lot of us, certainly those of us reading this type of book, do, and she's not trying to make us more comfortable with that fact. Like the author, I also married for love and was "whisked away" from all that I knew at the time. My story, though, doesn't involve me falling into a great job because of my language skills and cultural differences, and I highly doubt I'd ever be able (or desire) to hack it in the industry the author works in. On the other hand, her reminders to us to be assertive, to truly be comfortable with ourselves, and to perhaps dig deeper into why we're not always okay with true competition with one another, are useful and applicable. Throughout this book, I identified parallels between her life and my own and then the two stories would veer away from one another again, perhaps to return later in some small way. So the author appears to have walked into a few choice opportunities, but I find it difficult to justify the claim that her whole life has simply been charmed and she's not qualified to tell "the rest of us" how it's done because she has no idea how "the rest of us" have to make things happen. I think the author is a woman who has guts, a sharp mind, and the "savoir faire" to make things work her way. She knows what she does and does not like, and she knows what she's good at. These are certainly things I want to be able to definitively declare about myself as I'm digging deeper in my career to determine my own long-term goals, so I appreciate that about her writing, even as I'm certain I'll never run in the same type of circles she does. At several points in this book I had to stop and think through some of what the author said specifically about men. Was it bashing, or merely comparing? The longer I thought about this, the more I wondered if perhaps her belief in women, and herself, as inherently better at many things, isn't a large part of her success. That "I'm better than you mentality" can easily rub a lot of us the wrong way at first glance or meeting, but I've come to respect it. Still, I think I'm leaning toward calling it man bashing in this book, and that's something I try to shy away from as I try to differentiate myself in a positive way as a woman working among men. (Can I not be excellent on my own, without comparison to someone else or advertising their shortcomings?) I had some difficulty getting past this as I read this text, so I did at several points imagine myself in conversation with the author, asking for clarification. Certainly, don't expect this book to be a "how to" guide to success. (I believe the author even states this somewhere near the beginning.) Alternately, there are very literal guides dropped into this book, including recipes for entertaining business colleagues and superiors as well as a detailed list of wardrobe must-haves. In this way, I think this book is a "just enough to get you headed in the right direction" type of guide. The author won't tell you exactly what path you should take to get where you want to be, but she'll give you enough that if you're really interested in pursuing this, you might be inspired further to figure it out. Chances are, if you picked this title up in the first place you're already doing some self-exploration and you'll find the value in her story as an example of someone who has clearly done well. If you're on a mission to become a more polished professional woman, you might find something of value here, certainly if you're not easily offended by someone who clearly has the guts to say things very bluntly. I did make a list of reminders and important excerpts as I read through this, so I certainly found some value in Mireille Guiliano's wisdom and her decision to share it with us.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Eustacia Tan

    Since I've just entered job hunting season (I even had an all-day event today), I thought this would be a good book to read (who am I kidding, I was reading job hunting books even before the season. Even before I entered university, probably). Plus, it actually kept my attention past the first chapter in a "my Scribd membership is expiring and I have too many books to read" sort of reading death match, where everything that did not catch my interest by the first chapter got filed for "when I'm b Since I've just entered job hunting season (I even had an all-day event today), I thought this would be a good book to read (who am I kidding, I was reading job hunting books even before the season. Even before I entered university, probably). Plus, it actually kept my attention past the first chapter in a "my Scribd membership is expiring and I have too many books to read" sort of reading death match, where everything that did not catch my interest by the first chapter got filed for "when I'm back in Singapore". Anyway, Women, Work & the Art of Savoir Faire is meant to be a handbook to women just starting out, to help them navigate the tightrope that is work and life. It's basically full of anecdotes from the author, about her career in the wine business, and what they can mean for the reader. Personally, I liked the book. I found it engaging, and I liked the author's tone. A lot of what she says makes sense, especially about goal setting and priorities. In particular, the line "Your heart should be in your work, but that doesn't mean your work has to be something you have always loved." caught my attention, because a teacher once said something similar. Actually, what my teacher said was "your ideal industry is almost always different from what you think it is, so don't stick to it so closely". I think I like this way of putting it better than my teacher. I mean, I love reading, writing, piano, but I'm not at all of that (i.e. piano), and in fact, what I'm hoping to do in the future is something related to Industry 4.0/Industrial Internet. That's actually pretty broad, so I'm hoping I can find a job that interests me. Towards the end, she talks about things like the differences between men and women in work, and well, I'm not so sure about that. Other parts of the book, like wining and dining in business, may not be as useful to me, since Japan has a fairly unique dining culture. Although I think with globalisation, what she says is probably going to make sense sooner or later. Overall, I think this was a good book for me to read at the start of the job hunting season. It managed to calm me down, and remind me to be more selective when picking which events that I want to go to. This review was first posted at Inside the mind of a Bibliophile

  10. 4 out of 5

    gina

    I listened to the audiobook version, read by the author herself. Perhaps it is simply a matter of personal preference but I despised her voice and her inability to speak American English properly. She is french and had a strong stereotypical french accent. At first, unaccustomed to this accent I had to strain to figure out the pattern of her dropped consonants and mangled vowels. Still, even several chapters in I'd be left scratching my head over a word that even in context it took several secon I listened to the audiobook version, read by the author herself. Perhaps it is simply a matter of personal preference but I despised her voice and her inability to speak American English properly. She is french and had a strong stereotypical french accent. At first, unaccustomed to this accent I had to strain to figure out the pattern of her dropped consonants and mangled vowels. Still, even several chapters in I'd be left scratching my head over a word that even in context it took several seconds to figure out. I've said it before and I'll say it again, if the readers voice detracts from the listeners ability to listen seamlessly and effortless to the story (i.e. they have to work hard just first to figure out what word you are saying) then they will not be able to completely understand, absorb or enjoy the work as the author has intended. That said she brags constantly about how famous her voice is and how wonderful *everyone* thinks it is and how she was basically forced ("what moi? No... I couldn't...") to do voice overs and adds for her company because of how amazingly fantastic her voice is. Excuse me while I gag myself. Her "I'm so amazingly perfect" attitude is strung throughout the book. In fact it is a major theme of the book, as it is she, successful at all things, who has decided to impart upon us peons her amazing recipe for success. Only I almost despised her so much with her voice, and cocky attitude, and antiquated ideas about women and society that I could barely pick out the good in the book. There is good in there. But for the love of God if you want to get at it easily do NOT get the audiobook. Good luck. I would not recommend this book to anyone. It's mostly worthless fluff and you can pick up the important parts from other sources easily as she brings nothing new to the table.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Bloodorange

    Let's say I read it so that you don't have to. It's a cut above reading career advice in Cosmo. It reads OK, but the content is a) really nothing you wouldn't find everywhere else (other than the writer's emphasis on the importance of good writing skills and good manners in the business environment), b) rather unrelatable in today's economy.

  12. 5 out of 5

    ashleyTIA

    Sound advice - nothing earth-shattering, but I needed all the reminders. Mireille definitely has me daydreaming about all things French lately. I enjoyed this enough that I plan on reading her other books soon.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Fiona Forthe

    I really enjoyed her first book, but this one I didn't love so much. This is less prescriptive and it's too vague to really be very helpful. It is a quick read, though, and for women just starting out in their careers it may provide some help or clarity around business.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Christina Boyle

    Her writing style is basically insufferable. I had to grit my teeth and make it through the end of the book. It was nonetheless interesting to hear her success tips, even if most were platitudes.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    I did not enjoy reading this book and found the voice of this author to be annoying.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alexa Oliphant

    The only way I think I can accurately sum up "Women, Work, and the Art of Savoir Faire" is its a book written about by a chic grandma. Impossible chic, if that makes me sound like less of a curmudgeon. I've long been a fan of Mireille Guiliano's work, which had all previously asserted (in decent writing no less) that you could indeed, enjoy tasty ass buttery food and incorporate it into a healthful diet. Here, MG takes what she's known from a long career in business as the former head of Vueve C The only way I think I can accurately sum up "Women, Work, and the Art of Savoir Faire" is its a book written about by a chic grandma. Impossible chic, if that makes me sound like less of a curmudgeon. I've long been a fan of Mireille Guiliano's work, which had all previously asserted (in decent writing no less) that you could indeed, enjoy tasty ass buttery food and incorporate it into a healthful diet. Here, MG takes what she's known from a long career in business as the former head of Vueve Clicquot in the US and puts it into advice for working women. The result? Some solid suggestions for overall themes to apply to your career. However, I don't think I'm the only one in the room that knows the rules of the game have changed thanks to the advancements of ye olde internet. However, never under estimate the power of real talk: work hard, know your limits, but push to exceed them - like a little black dress (or other lame cliches) these nuggets of truth never go out of style.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nurliyana

    A super good reminder that suggest working females have so much to contribute to the industry in our own classy way. Maybe the downside was how her French accent and identity has huge impact in her career, and that alone is unique to her, but there is no way I am denying that the rest is good. She talk about the reality we are facing, the discrimination, and how we need to just work it out. Yes, the gender bias perception is starting to change, but it sure will take a lot of time, so in the mean A super good reminder that suggest working females have so much to contribute to the industry in our own classy way. Maybe the downside was how her French accent and identity has huge impact in her career, and that alone is unique to her, but there is no way I am denying that the rest is good. She talk about the reality we are facing, the discrimination, and how we need to just work it out. Yes, the gender bias perception is starting to change, but it sure will take a lot of time, so in the mean time we just gotta hustle. Can't help it. A good book for every female out there no matter which stage in life you are currently in. and hey, that cover picture? Cute! I'm loving those little red graphics in the beginning of each chapter too.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    It was interesting reading a book about the business world, since I have spent my entire life and career in the education and non-profit world. While Guiliano's world is too elite to be relevant to most women, and she is definitely of the older, women-need-to-behave-differently-from-men era, I still found some useful pieces of advice. I also enjoyed hearing about her career and how she succeeded in it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    mz

    Just finished reading this one for the second time. I loved this book the first time I read it as a twenty-something who had recently graduated from college, and even now, as a more mature working mother, I find its advice timely and relevant, though less so than before. At this point, my family and work life differ more from Mireille's, but her overall principles are still good guideposts. I recommend this book to all women, but to women without children especially.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Loved this book. Gleaned a lot as a woman in business. Great thoughts presented with class and style. Listened to the author read this book and felt like I was being mentored by her. Favorite chapters was the one on leadership and the one on differences between women and men in the workplace.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Emma Cochrane

    Some good anecdotes, personal tone. Some of the thinking felt a bit dated, especially around gender roles, and it seemed at times to be about how to succeed if you’re a white, wealthy, thin, traditionally feminine woman.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Christine

    Actually i feel this book is really good. She shared about her journey in work life (when she joined a company). And she shared some tips about work, life. But some chapters at the beginning, i feel quite hard to understand what she wants to tell.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Monica

    Listened on audio, good reference book for any woman looking for some business etiquette and career advice. And you get to hear the author's story of working up the corporate ladder as a woman, which fascinated and encouraged me to continue fighting for my own dreams of success.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Fleury

    Common sense, elegantly told Candid, yet pleasant reminder of the common sense so few actually put into practice. It’s a quick read, well worth the time.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Alexis

    Loved listening to Mireille Guiliano and now know where I a put my napkin if I leave the table... And a lot more.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kimberly

    I just love her books! I always feel more cultured, an reassured, that my efforts to maintain mother's approval on my upbringing was not wasted.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    maybe b/c I'm not in the same phase/life arena as the author, but I just couldn't get into it. a lot of extra info if you're not in high profile sale, IMO.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Raquel

    The beginning was a little slow, imho, but the latter part of the book provided me savvy tips and ideas I have not seen in other business books.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    Decent "beginner" career book. Not as specific or fun as Guiliano's other books.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Gina McNiel

    Of course, I couldn't pass up reading this book even though my career is education not business. It's Mireille Guiliano! This book is another no-nonsense approach to business and success, even though she says she doesn't care for that word. I could glean some of her suggestions and approaches and use it in my educational setting so I felt this is a book for all to enjoy. Men might especially enjoy reading it as Mireille highlights the inequities for women in the business world from business meet Of course, I couldn't pass up reading this book even though my career is education not business. It's Mireille Guiliano! This book is another no-nonsense approach to business and success, even though she says she doesn't care for that word. I could glean some of her suggestions and approaches and use it in my educational setting so I felt this is a book for all to enjoy. Men might especially enjoy reading it as Mireille highlights the inequities for women in the business world from business meeting golf games to salary discrepancies. Sometimes the obvious is not so obvious when you are living in it.

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