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Sometimes, we fall in love on mission trips even though we know we’ll break up when we get back. Sometimes, you have to shot block a friend’s prayer because she’s asking God to bless an obviously bad dating relationship. Sometimes, you think, “I wish I had a t-shirt that said ‘I direct deposit my tithe’ so people wouldn’t judge me.” Sometimes, the stuff that comes with fai Sometimes, we fall in love on mission trips even though we know we’ll break up when we get back. Sometimes, you have to shot block a friend’s prayer because she’s asking God to bless an obviously bad dating relationship. Sometimes, you think, “I wish I had a t-shirt that said ‘I direct deposit my tithe’ so people wouldn’t judge me.” Sometimes, the stuff that comes with faith is funny. This is that stuff. Jonathan Acuff’s Stuff Christians Like is your field guide to all things Christian. In it you’ll learn the culinary magic of the crock-pot. Think you’ve got a Metro worship leader—Use Acuff’s checklist. Want to avoid a prayer handholding faux pas? Acuff has you covered. Like a satirical grenade, Acuff brings us the humor and honesty that galvanized more than a million online readers from more than 200 countries in a new portable version. Welcome to the funny side of faith.


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Sometimes, we fall in love on mission trips even though we know we’ll break up when we get back. Sometimes, you have to shot block a friend’s prayer because she’s asking God to bless an obviously bad dating relationship. Sometimes, you think, “I wish I had a t-shirt that said ‘I direct deposit my tithe’ so people wouldn’t judge me.” Sometimes, the stuff that comes with fai Sometimes, we fall in love on mission trips even though we know we’ll break up when we get back. Sometimes, you have to shot block a friend’s prayer because she’s asking God to bless an obviously bad dating relationship. Sometimes, you think, “I wish I had a t-shirt that said ‘I direct deposit my tithe’ so people wouldn’t judge me.” Sometimes, the stuff that comes with faith is funny. This is that stuff. Jonathan Acuff’s Stuff Christians Like is your field guide to all things Christian. In it you’ll learn the culinary magic of the crock-pot. Think you’ve got a Metro worship leader—Use Acuff’s checklist. Want to avoid a prayer handholding faux pas? Acuff has you covered. Like a satirical grenade, Acuff brings us the humor and honesty that galvanized more than a million online readers from more than 200 countries in a new portable version. Welcome to the funny side of faith.

30 review for Stuff Christians Like

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad Bearden

    I almost feel like I was tricked into reading "Stuff Christians Like" by Jonathan Acuff. I saw it on a table at Barnes & Noble labeled "Religion", which normally I'd walk right past, but its cover had an amusing diagram of a couple demonstating the 'side hug' manaeuver, so I thought perhaps the volume was more than just empty spiritual drivel. Leafing through it, there were several humerously simple drawings and section headings that seemed more interested in mocking Christians than inspirin I almost feel like I was tricked into reading "Stuff Christians Like" by Jonathan Acuff. I saw it on a table at Barnes & Noble labeled "Religion", which normally I'd walk right past, but its cover had an amusing diagram of a couple demonstating the 'side hug' manaeuver, so I thought perhaps the volume was more than just empty spiritual drivel. Leafing through it, there were several humerously simple drawings and section headings that seemed more interested in mocking Christians than inspiring them, so I read a few passages and was rewarded with short essays about how Christians so blatantly ignore copyright law (they borrow liberally from corporate logo designs in concocting their own 'clever' inspirational slogans for t-shirts and whatnot) and how supposedly enlightening testimonials are usually just people telling about how awesome their lives were until they accepted Christ when all the fun promptly ended. I put the book down that day and went about my business, but a week or so later, came across it again at a different Barnes & Noble, and couldn't quite resist the urge. I bought it, joking with the clerk as I checked out about how the book was categorized in the 'Christian/Inspirational' section. Those dumb Christians are so gullible! So then I finally read it, and I'll be damned (pun intended) if I didn't realize I'd been bamboozeled! It turns out, Jonathan Acuff is a devout Christian! And his little book is a collection of postings from his Christian blog that actually is supposed to be inspirational!! It turns out, Mr. Acuff used my cynicism against me, appealing to me via sarcasm and dry wit! And I fell for it, hook line and sinker. My hat's off to the author. Bravo, sir. So once I'd discovered the true intent of "Stuff Christians Like", how did I fare? Well, actually, I had some fun with it. As a veteran of east Texas Baptist churches and conservative small town sensibilities, I found myself familiar with many of the little idiosyncracies Acuff is poking fun at, whose gentle attacks on his subjects betray his affection for the very people of whom he is making fun (which frequently include himself). There's good natured ribbing at hipster youth pastors with soul-patches who like to play frisbee. Perplexity over which parts of the Old Testament we should follow and which parts are overruled by the New Testament. Humorous frustration about inconsistant prayer and quiet time and the awkwardness of witnessing to friends and co-workers. Jokes about how small churches and mega-churches share mutual pity for one another. Rather candid opinions on how Christians should view sex. It's a trove of things that every church-going Christian surely notices as the Sundays tick off the calendar, but are maybe too uncouth to ever mention out loud. All in all, a refreshing look at a sub-culture that can come off as quite annoying to the uninitiated. The only place the book really falls flat is unfortunately its final chapter where Acuff forgoes the humor in favor of actual earnest inspirational essays. As willing as I was to put aside my spiritual differences and enjoy the affectionate joshing Acuff gives to his religious brethren, it was difficult not to roll my eyes at Acuff's proselytizing with corny platitudes about everybody being a celebrity in God's eyes or trusting God to help with your troubles instead of struggling so hard on your own. I don't begrudge people who find comfort and solace in platitudes, but they're still platitudes. Final verdict? I have some Christian friends who I think would totally enjoy this book, not only for the humor but also for the inspiration that was totally lost on me. As a matter of fact, I think I'll give my copy to one of my co-workers as a late Christmas present.

  2. 5 out of 5

    John

    If you're not familiar with Jon Acuff, he is a wildly popular blogger who has built a reputation out of being able to see what's comical about this crazy business called evangelical Christianity. Never sarcastic, never bitter, cynical or critical, but playfully and affectionately he pokes fun at all of our little idiosyncracies in dozens of short essays with titles like "Ranking Honeymoon Sex Slightly Higher than the Second Coming of Christ" "Watching R Rated Movies... But Only If They're Violen If you're not familiar with Jon Acuff, he is a wildly popular blogger who has built a reputation out of being able to see what's comical about this crazy business called evangelical Christianity. Never sarcastic, never bitter, cynical or critical, but playfully and affectionately he pokes fun at all of our little idiosyncracies in dozens of short essays with titles like "Ranking Honeymoon Sex Slightly Higher than the Second Coming of Christ" "Watching R Rated Movies... But Only If They're Violent" "Being Slightly Offended that the Pastor Has a Nicer Car Than You Do" "Feeling Slightly Disappointed When Someone Accepts Our Fake Offer of Generosity".... ok, I could go on an on and on here, just like Jon does... this guy is scary good about mixing up social commentary, hip pop culture references, and humor in a no holds barred cage match of a book. "Seriously, why would I hire a full-time youth minister when I can get a real working traffic light for only $378?" "I've never gotten a speeding ticket, but if I ever do, I want to be honest with you. I'm going to name-drop God." "Christianity needs to be more relevant... How can I witness to someone about the love of Christ if I can't hang in a conversation about Family Guy?" But what I liked most about the book is the last collection of essays, which were the "serious ones." Jon proves that he thinks deeply and sincerely about what it means to walk with Christ in a fallen world. In the last essay of the book, he concludes that the message of Christianity is that we are sick, but we are loved, and that we must embrace both. And I think humor helps us to do that. So let's be sick, and let's be loved, and let's have a few good laughs along the way.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    I was sitting on an hour long bus ride home and thought I'd put this in for a few smiles. Forget smiles, I was laughing out loud almost the entire trip back. People kept giving me funny looks. I tried to keep it in. It burst out anyway. Though this book is starting to feel ever so slightly dated, I was delighted by how dead-on accurate it was. The story about the boy and the mustard really broke my heart though. I like that Acuff wraps it up on a slightly serious note. It made the overall book l I was sitting on an hour long bus ride home and thought I'd put this in for a few smiles. Forget smiles, I was laughing out loud almost the entire trip back. People kept giving me funny looks. I tried to keep it in. It burst out anyway. Though this book is starting to feel ever so slightly dated, I was delighted by how dead-on accurate it was. The story about the boy and the mustard really broke my heart though. I like that Acuff wraps it up on a slightly serious note. It made the overall book less fluff and more...I don't know. Grace. Good stuff if you are looking for a laugh.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mitch Nichols

    Acuff takes a witty and humorous look at Evangelical Christianity in this collection of short vignettes which admittedly will primarily resonate with with those who have grown up in conservative circles. If you are not a fan of satire then this book is definitely not for you. Often Christians feel the freedom to laugh or make jokes at the expense of those not part of their subculture and bristle when the roles are reversed and we are the ones being skewered. In a clever and engaging way Acuff wr Acuff takes a witty and humorous look at Evangelical Christianity in this collection of short vignettes which admittedly will primarily resonate with with those who have grown up in conservative circles. If you are not a fan of satire then this book is definitely not for you. Often Christians feel the freedom to laugh or make jokes at the expense of those not part of their subculture and bristle when the roles are reversed and we are the ones being skewered. In a clever and engaging way Acuff writes what many of us have thought ourselves or even actually done, but are too embarrassed to admit. If we cannot laugh at ourselves as we grow in the Gospel then maybe we need to re-evaluate if we truly are willing to experience the joy of life in Christ. After all; everything is a gift of God including humor and satire...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Brian Eshleman

    This guy is a GREAT communicator! He can get real laughs in an ironic sort of way that doesn't reach for them. He can communicate Truth in a way that cuts to the quick before defenses of intellect or tradition have been put in place.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Starr Light

    Bullet Review: I adored this. If you've ever gone to church regularly (particularly in the past 15 years), you will get a lot of the jokes. The second half is far more sober, more sermon-ish, but Acuff writes well.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Wilson

    Most of this book was pretty funny. Some of it was lame. Parts of it were magnificent. Hence the trouble with the number of stars.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tanya

    Oh my lord this book was funny. Being raised in church, this is basically one big inside joke for Christians. Satire & witty sarcasm are my favorite types of humor & are definitely something you don't see too much in Christian literature. Jon Acuff is hilarious & this book was like every weird thing Christians do but no one has addressed them until now. Some of the funnier parts of this book: when that ever uncomfortable moment comes when the pastor asks you to join hands in prayer w Oh my lord this book was funny. Being raised in church, this is basically one big inside joke for Christians. Satire & witty sarcasm are my favorite types of humor & are definitely something you don't see too much in Christian literature. Jon Acuff is hilarious & this book was like every weird thing Christians do but no one has addressed them until now. Some of the funnier parts of this book: when that ever uncomfortable moment comes when the pastor asks you to join hands in prayer with those beside you & you have to hold hands with a stranger. I've never had someone try to interlock fingers with me like has happened to the author, but I could totally see it happening. I also laughed when he writes about satan (who he purposefully "gives the middle finger of grammar with a lower case s" to). I also liked the 7 types of people who pray which don't include the Encore-ist (the person who inevitably follows the person who is supposed to close in prayer, boldly defying all rules of group prayer and dragging it on. He explains he doesn't include the Encore-ist on the list of 7 types because "even God can't stand that person". Basically I think that if you aren't a Christian or go ti church this book might not be as funny because these are a lot of satirical situations that you'd have to experience to appreciate. But it's extremely well-written & I totally fell in love with this guys humor. I checked out his blog too www.stuffchristianslike.net which was funny too.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Hilary

    This is based on the popular blog which I'd seen a few times but don't follow, so I don't know how much is new content just for the book. Loosely arranged into themes, there's an array of short articles ranging from the absurd to very thought-provoking, some gently satirical and some deliberately humorous. You may not identify with all of them, nor may you agree with his slant, but I found it a refreshing book for sporadic reading, and was somewhat relieved that other people have the same proble This is based on the popular blog which I'd seen a few times but don't follow, so I don't know how much is new content just for the book. Loosely arranged into themes, there's an array of short articles ranging from the absurd to very thought-provoking, some gently satirical and some deliberately humorous. You may not identify with all of them, nor may you agree with his slant, but I found it a refreshing book for sporadic reading, and was somewhat relieved that other people have the same problem/thought process I do!

  10. 5 out of 5

    David Sarkies

    A satrical look at the quirks of Christians 16 January 2013 I thought I had already written a commentary on this book but when I checked Goodreads, and also the file where I keep a backup of all my commentaries (it is about 762 pages long) I couldn't find it. Anyway, this was one of those books that was being passed around the small group, and in turn the church, by one of the girls that seemed to always get her hands on some interesting things. I remember flicking through it at small group (okay A satrical look at the quirks of Christians 16 January 2013 I thought I had already written a commentary on this book but when I checked Goodreads, and also the file where I keep a backup of all my commentaries (it is about 762 pages long) I couldn't find it. Anyway, this was one of those books that was being passed around the small group, and in turn the church, by one of the girls that seemed to always get her hands on some interesting things. I remember flicking through it at small group (okay, after the actual bible study because we always had to focus on the bible study at small group, not that there is anything wrong with that) and then putting my name onto the list to read it next. I guess this is one of those books that make me uncomfortable, much like the Simpsons. The reason I say that is because the Simpsons has a way of showing us what society is like: they take some of the really bad aspects and turn them into a joke. This book does the same with Christians, mostly in the United States but much of what applies over there also applies here in Australia. However, the problem of laughing at some of these things is that while on the page they are funny, in reality they are not. The church that Acuff seems to be looking at is pretty much the conservative, but not too funamentalist, church (the more fundamentalist a church becomes, the less you are allowed to laugh, criticise, or even poke fun at it) and in a way we simply look at how Christians really behave. Sort of like everybody wants to be a small group leader (because if you are a small group leader then you are obviously a Christian of some worth) but nobody actually wants to take the job of packing up the chairs after the service, or sweeping the floor, and of course there is the ubiquitous cleaning of the toilets. It is also interesting some of the things that be brings out, such as the 'prayer block' - which happens when somebody is praying for something that they shouldn't be praying for (such as that relationship that they are in that they really shouldn't be in). It is interesting because in a way Christianity is about freedom, but freedom only too an extent. I do understand when they talk about the freedom of being able to say no (such as saying no to that tempting relationship) but I think the better way to look at it is to have to power to keep your emotions in check. At one stage I scoffed at that idea, but have since come to realise that this freedom comes down to not being ruled by your emotions, which is something that many of us do not realise. I guess it come down to the book of Corinthians, in what one pastor described as a 'no-fall zone'. Personally, I thought what he was talking about was a little corny, but then they all have their own characteristics (at least in some areas, others the bible college pretty much churns out clones). The one passage in Corinthians which this idea turns on is the idea that everything is permissible but not everything is beneficial. The question is not so much whether we can do it or not, but whether by doing this we are benefiting ourselves and our church. Another pastor once described it like walking near a cliff. We can either go up as close to a cliff as possible to see how far we can get without falling off, or we can turn around and walk the other way. By all means, getting into a relationship with a non-believer is permissible, but the question you must ask is whether it is beneficial. Who will end up having more influence over the relationship, because all it takes is for the unbelieving partner to begin to put pressure on you to stop going to church, and to stop hanging around with those obnoxious Christians to begin to draw you away from the salvation that has been given to you.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    As the son of a one-time preacher man, this was a read that made a thousand memories flood back into view. I think I appreciated that. I chuckled fairly frequently, laughed a couple times, got sad a few times, and tore through this read on a plane ride. bits that nailed me: + using "faith like a child" as an escape pod from difficult theological discussions + judging fundamentalists for being judgmental + hating on megachurches + saying someone is going to have a bigger house in heaven than you + find As the son of a one-time preacher man, this was a read that made a thousand memories flood back into view. I think I appreciated that. I chuckled fairly frequently, laughed a couple times, got sad a few times, and tore through this read on a plane ride. bits that nailed me: + using "faith like a child" as an escape pod from difficult theological discussions + judging fundamentalists for being judgmental + hating on megachurches + saying someone is going to have a bigger house in heaven than you + finding typos in the worship music + the smell of old hymnals + writing "Xian" instead of "Christian" other bits funny, totally true, and/or poignant to me: + not knowing whether to pray for a friend having *plastic* surgery + missionary dating: when God calls you to convert the sexy and unchurched + disguising gossip as prayer + telling other people maybe God gave them the gift of singleness + falling in love on a mission trip + the metrosexual worship leader (with funny +/- points quiz to discern where he ranks) + crock pots + tuning out if the pastor is younger + fearing your church will do something wacky the one time you invite a friend + losing the will to clap during songs + tragically hip church names that sound like designer clothing stores + bringing someone The Casserole of Hope during a tough time + completely disregarding all known copyright laws + not knowing how to hold hands (*never* interlock your fingers! -- personal funny story for that one) + scheduling a "revival" + telling testimonies that are really exciting right up to the point one actually became a Christian + side hugs + guilt trips + pretending to believe all sins are equal + confessing "safe sins" + temporarily suspending faith when getting behind the wheel to drive [seriously, some of the Jesus-fish drivers out there are crazy-go-nuts]

  12. 5 out of 5

    Tim P

    I really wish this book was called "Stuff Evangelical Christians Like" or "Stuff really intense life consuming Christians like" because it's not very relatable for anyone else. I have nothing but respect for the way those people live their lives but I guess I didn't think this book would be so specific. It's not really what stuff Christians like. It's what Christian stuff Christians like. This was partially my fault for not checking this out here beforehand but it was an impulse buy. I consider I really wish this book was called "Stuff Evangelical Christians Like" or "Stuff really intense life consuming Christians like" because it's not very relatable for anyone else. I have nothing but respect for the way those people live their lives but I guess I didn't think this book would be so specific. It's not really what stuff Christians like. It's what Christian stuff Christians like. This was partially my fault for not checking this out here beforehand but it was an impulse buy. I consider myself a religious person. I was raised Catholic and went to bible camps as a kid. However none of that will help me laugh along a full chapter on the etiquette of being called by Jesus to the front of a gymnasium sized church or the clothing choices of youth pastors. There was some stuff that I was able to laugh along with but they were few and far between. There's only so much prayer circles and mission trips you can read about while feeling on the outside of an inside joke before you say enough so though it's rare for me I didn't finish it I should say the people in the book and the author seem like amazing people and I wish them all the best. I just wanted to post this review in case someone had the same misconception as me.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cafelilybookreviews

    This is one of those books that readers will either love or hate – there’s very little middle ground on this one. Jonathan Acuff grew up the son of a pastor and has the inside track on “stuff” that happens in churches. His approach in Stuff Christians Like is pretty edgy and I’m guessing that the more conservative reader may not appreciate his style. Although I didn’t find this book “side-splitting” hilarious, the author does make several good points in this book. One of myfavorites was Christia This is one of those books that readers will either love or hate – there’s very little middle ground on this one. Jonathan Acuff grew up the son of a pastor and has the inside track on “stuff” that happens in churches. His approach in Stuff Christians Like is pretty edgy and I’m guessing that the more conservative reader may not appreciate his style. Although I didn’t find this book “side-splitting” hilarious, the author does make several good points in this book. One of myfavorites was Christians who use prayer request time to spread gossip – how sad, and how true! I also thought his point about abstinence and how to teach it was good, as was his description of how Christians use vacation bible school for free babysitting, Facebook witnessing, Post Modern relevance, side hugs, etc. Jonathan Acuff tells the truth about a lot of taboo “hot topics” in the church/Christian circles but he did make me uncomfortable with some of the topics and opinions he shared in this book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Deborah

    Nothing appeals to me more than a good laugh, and Stuff Christians Like fit the bill perfectly. The sarcastic humour I love, with an oddly encouraging and uplifting twist. Perfect for Christians who don't take themselves too seriously ... or perhaps for those who do. The style of humour reminded me very much of Inside Timmy's Mind by Timmy Boyle. Short essays on a multitude of subjects designed to make you laugh. If you are feeling a little jaded with the Christian life and church, or perhaps jus Nothing appeals to me more than a good laugh, and Stuff Christians Like fit the bill perfectly. The sarcastic humour I love, with an oddly encouraging and uplifting twist. Perfect for Christians who don't take themselves too seriously ... or perhaps for those who do. The style of humour reminded me very much of Inside Timmy's Mind by Timmy Boyle. Short essays on a multitude of subjects designed to make you laugh. If you are feeling a little jaded with the Christian life and church, or perhaps just need a good chuckle, I highly recommend a dose of Jon Acuff's Stuff Christians Like. It really is the perfect picker-upper.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ana

    Over all a really good book. Some of it made me laugh, much of it made me grin, and sometimes it made me think. This is witty, sarcastic, goofy, and the occasional good-hearted kick in the pants we all need from time to time. Just like any nation has its stereotypes, so does the kingdom of God. Sometimes they're just silly and harmless. Other times it might be good for us to reflect on what needs changing. In any case, this is a great book for accomplishing any or all of the above.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    For the most part, this was just an okay read. It started out funny, but then some of the sarcasm was just not my cup of tea. I really liked the last chapter, though, probably because it took on a more serious vibe.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    I found Jon Acuff to be very funny and spot-on when it came to his satirical look at modern Christian culture. Although I have been familiar with Acuff's blog, StuffChristiansLike.net, for years, I have never been a regular reader of the blog. In fact, every entry in this book was new to me. The true hilarity in this books happens when the reader comes across an essay that covers a topic that is familiar to their own life. This relatability happened to me many times while reading this book. I th I found Jon Acuff to be very funny and spot-on when it came to his satirical look at modern Christian culture. Although I have been familiar with Acuff's blog, StuffChristiansLike.net, for years, I have never been a regular reader of the blog. In fact, every entry in this book was new to me. The true hilarity in this books happens when the reader comes across an essay that covers a topic that is familiar to their own life. This relatability happened to me many times while reading this book. I thought it was interesting that Acuff chose to end his humorous book with more serious essays on how Christians should live. Although I think that his insights were valuable, there was a sense in which the book ended on a down note. Again, I must emphasize that I liked what he had to say, but it felt out of place after pages and pages of satirical joke-telling. It is as if Acuff felt like he owed it to the audience, or to God, to have something more helpful tacked on the end. Here are some of my favorite entries in the book (in no particular order): Trying Not To Complain Around Missionaries (p. 30) Feeling Slightly Disappointed When Someone Accepts Our Fake Offer Of Generosity (p. 45) Just Using God's Favorite Word When We Pray (p. 52) The Seven People You Meet In A Prayer Circle (p. 53) The Hedge of Protection (p. 68) Raising Our Hands In Worship (p. 87) Fearing Your Church Will Do Something Wacky The One Time You Invite A Friend (p. 90) Leaving Room For The Holy Spirit When You Dance (p. 95) Using Vacation Bible School As Free Babysitting (p. 96) Finding Typos In The Worship Music (p.97) Losing The Will To Clap During Songs (p. 100) Mid-Prayer Music That Materializes Out Of Nowhere (p. 107) Telling Testimonies That Are Exciting Right Up Until The Moment You Became A Christian (p. 125) Suddenly Realizing You Own Fourteen Bibles (p. 149) Not Throwing Away A Bible (p. 157) Skipping Church If You Catch Even A Whiff Of A Guest Speaker (p. 178) Being Voluntold (p. 180)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Marsha Altman

    I don't know why this book is so popular. It does look clever from the title and cover and it intrigued me, but it's really for the Evangelical set. I enjoyed it as an anthropological exercise and it was kind of funny, but I couldn't relate to it. This guy lives in a very, very small and ignorant world where most people are not Christian even though they live in the United States. In the South. Specifically Georgia. In a small or medium-sized town. He talks constantly about explaing to others tha I don't know why this book is so popular. It does look clever from the title and cover and it intrigued me, but it's really for the Evangelical set. I enjoyed it as an anthropological exercise and it was kind of funny, but I couldn't relate to it. This guy lives in a very, very small and ignorant world where most people are not Christian even though they live in the United States. In the South. Specifically Georgia. In a small or medium-sized town. He talks constantly about explaing to others that he's Christian, being excited to find out someone he meets in a bookstore is Christian, and trying to convert his coworkers to Christianity. DUDE. YOU LIVE IN SMALL TOWN AMERICA. EVERYONE YOU KNOW IS CHRISTIAN. They were born Christians and they are Christians now and unless they move to the city and intermarry they will probably die Christians. Sure, 5% of them are atheists, but they'll probably not tell you that because they assume you will be a dick about it, since you've been dropping leaflets about how awesome Jesus is on their desks while they're in the bathroom. Unless you live in a town with a Reform synagogue or something, you probably don't even KNOW anyone who isn't Christian. You're not going to convert anyone in your immediate area. If they actively identify as a member of any other religion they obviously won't be interested. You're just going to possibly make some people temporarily more excited about Jesus. Or maybe they'll start going to your church instead of their church and its slightly different prayer service. But nobody's finding Jesus because of you, dude. They had just temporarily forgotten about him and you reminded them. And mission work? Teaching Africans about Jesus while they're starving to death? Kind of a dick move in the 21st century. How could you be a well-selling author and not know that?

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tung

    Everyone appreciates and utilizes inside jokes. Inside jokes appeal to us because of their immediate connection; the humor is built upon a shared experience. This book is essentially a collection of inside jokes for Christians. Similar to the site "Stuff White People Like", this book is a series of observations and snarky remarks about the things Christians say and do that don't make any sense (some examples: praying for a "hedge of protection", the seven kinds of people you meet in a prayer cir Everyone appreciates and utilizes inside jokes. Inside jokes appeal to us because of their immediate connection; the humor is built upon a shared experience. This book is essentially a collection of inside jokes for Christians. Similar to the site "Stuff White People Like", this book is a series of observations and snarky remarks about the things Christians say and do that don't make any sense (some examples: praying for a "hedge of protection", the seven kinds of people you meet in a prayer circle, complaining about "not being fed" at church, giving out tracts instead of Halloween candy, etc.) The critiques aren't mean-spirited or overly critical; rather they're sarcastic, meant to highlight their ridiculousness. Some of these will make you laugh out loud; most will make you smile; a few of these fell flat; but overall, humorous for those who get the observation (very Dave Barry in this way). This book is definitely a niche book and aimed at a specific audience. Non-Christians will not get any of the references (or simply use the book to fuel their ignorant hatred); older Christians and extreme fundamentalists will probably find offense; younger contemporary Christians who attend modern evangelical churches -- yeah, you're going to find this funny and share it with everyone you know. Recommended for everyone who has posted a Tim Hawkins video clip to Facebook or laughed at a Tim Hawkins video. A pass for those who don't know who Tim Hawkins is.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Chibineko

    I'll admit it- I recognized several of the bits in this book from my own personal experiences or from watching some of my friends. In fact, I'd go as far as to say that several of the "What Christians Like" bits in this book tend to stretch to several different religious beliefs. I've seen more than one person that isn't a Christian do several of the things in this book. The book collects several different blogs by Jonathan Acuff, all of which deal with things that Christians like. The subject m I'll admit it- I recognized several of the bits in this book from my own personal experiences or from watching some of my friends. In fact, I'd go as far as to say that several of the "What Christians Like" bits in this book tend to stretch to several different religious beliefs. I've seen more than one person that isn't a Christian do several of the things in this book. The book collects several different blogs by Jonathan Acuff, all of which deal with things that Christians like. The subject matter ranges from funny cartoons to turning brand names into God slogans (turning Subway into God'sWay). The blogs are all divided into several different chapters, all of which deal with different issues. Don't have a lot of time? No problem- most of the bits only last for about a page or so, which makes for a great bathroom read or something fun to read if you're sitting & waiting for someone. While I don't view myself as the most devout Christian out there, I really think that this book will appeal to a broad audience of people. You don't have to be an "over the top" religious person in order to enjoy this book. I'll admit- this book ended up being funnier than I expected it to be. Even if you're just one of the people who go to church on holidays, you'll enjoy this book. You'll read it & point stuff out to a friend or family member, saying "Hey, I know someone just like this!" (ARC provided by amazon vine)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    I laughed and laughed at many of the essays in Stuff Christians Like. Anyone familiar with evangelicalism, whether a member of the movement or not, will find this book amusing and worth flipping through, much like the popular website it originated from. I first discovered the SCL blog when it was brand new, and have checked in periodically to read the true and hilarious insights that Acuff provides on evangelical Christianity, a subculture ripe for the mocking. Evangelicals are famous for ripping I laughed and laughed at many of the essays in Stuff Christians Like. Anyone familiar with evangelicalism, whether a member of the movement or not, will find this book amusing and worth flipping through, much like the popular website it originated from. I first discovered the SCL blog when it was brand new, and have checked in periodically to read the true and hilarious insights that Acuff provides on evangelical Christianity, a subculture ripe for the mocking. Evangelicals are famous for ripping off secular things and injecting Christianity into them, and SCL is a perfect example. Going beyond mere analysis to provide almost devotional content and conviction for evangelical readers makes it more than just the evangelical parallel to the wildly popular Stuff White People Like. The personal, intimate details would be foreign in any other culture, but in evangelical books, it's a necessity. Stuff Christians Like has surpassed its predecessor with bigger, more spiritual aims. Touche, Mr. Acuff, touche. **I received this book through Amazon's Vine Program. Accepting a free copy of the book does not obligate me to provide a positive review.**

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer AlLee

    There aren't many books that make me laugh out loud. The problem with Stuff Christians Like is that it had me laughing so much, it threw me out of stealth reading mode. My teenage son quickly realized he was missing out on the fun. From then on, it was a battle to see who'd pick up the book first and get to say, "Oh, you've got to hear this." What makes Stuff Christians Like so funny is the honesty of it. Anybody who's been in church for awhile can relate to these short entries with titles like D There aren't many books that make me laugh out loud. The problem with Stuff Christians Like is that it had me laughing so much, it threw me out of stealth reading mode. My teenage son quickly realized he was missing out on the fun. From then on, it was a battle to see who'd pick up the book first and get to say, "Oh, you've got to hear this." What makes Stuff Christians Like so funny is the honesty of it. Anybody who's been in church for awhile can relate to these short entries with titles like Dominating the "Please Turn to..." Bible Race During Church, Side Hugs, and Using "Let Me Pray About It" As a Euphemism For "No." But don't fear. Despite his razor sharp wit, there's never a question about Acuff's motives. He's one of us, and he's laughing with us, not at us. If you need a pick-me-up, do yourself a favor and get a copy of Stuff Christians Like. Just don't read it during church... unless you want to cause a commotion. NOTE: I received a copy of this book from the publisher for reviewing purposes.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Joy

    This satirical book had me rolling from page one.. as a Christian who was raised in the church (pastor's kid), in the south, in a town that is the home of a prominent Christian university... well.. this was just like one big inside joke for those who have lived through and seen the reason for many of the stereotypes that are placed on American Christians today. I was laughing through the entire book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jon

    hilarious this guy has definitely grown up in church convicting smart author comfortable humor satire upon painful satire funny story: popped this in to listen with some teenagers on a road trip. First chapter: stuff christians like: "Ranking honeymoon sex slightly higher than the second coming of Christ" welp. maybe we just listen to music I literally laughed out loud several times in this book. very enjoyable

  25. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    A super quick, funny read, complete with pictures. I think I got most of the jokes so I feel fully integrated into the Christian subculture, for better or worse. I really like Jon Acuff, whom I was introduced to by Dave Ramsey. He's a great speaker, too. I'll probably pick up his other books, although they are more business oriented.

  26. 5 out of 5

    J. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

    The author is a mainstream, contemporary Christian and the book is too funny. I laughed out loud several times, especially the part about men crying in church. Update: Second listen, still chuckled repeatedly.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Aislinn

    "I think the uber-popular Christian prayer request for a "hedge of protection" is in the bible, but I'm not sure. It sounds like something David would have written in the book of Psalms. He's very poetic and our most Bono-like writer."

  28. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Love the book--Jon Acuff boldly goes where few Christians have gone before; making fun of ourselves. There were 4-5 times I found myself reading this out loud to my wife (who follows Jon on twitter). If you want a good belly laugh read this book.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mike Rydman

    Every churched person needs this on their shelf! Very, very funny! I laughed at myself throughout the entire read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kaela Spencer

    3.5 stars This was so funny and enjoyable audio-book. I think it can be used as an amazing way to witness to people.

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