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Men of Iron

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This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.


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This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

30 review for Men of Iron

  1. 4 out of 5

    Zane Jones

    Ehh. I liked it, but didn't love it - too much thee-ing and thou-ing for my taste, plus it was written in the early 1900s style of Old English. (Did they really talk like that, or is that just what early twentieth century authors thought they talked like?) I used to love Robin Hood by the same author, though. xP I was kind of obsessed with Robin Hood for a while. 3 stars.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Curtiss

    This novel was the basis of the Hollywood movie, "The Black Shield of Falworth," starring Tony Curtis, and Janet Leigh. It depicts the struggle of young Myles Falworth to learn the truth about his family's disgrace in mediaeval England during the reign of Henry IV, and his training as first a squire and later as a knight to prepare him to avenge his father's honor and restore the family name of Falworth on the roster of English chivalry. The movie version heightens the story's drama by adding a s This novel was the basis of the Hollywood movie, "The Black Shield of Falworth," starring Tony Curtis, and Janet Leigh. It depicts the struggle of young Myles Falworth to learn the truth about his family's disgrace in mediaeval England during the reign of Henry IV, and his training as first a squire and later as a knight to prepare him to avenge his father's honor and restore the family name of Falworth on the roster of English chivalry. The movie version heightens the story's drama by adding a second love interest for Myles' best friend, and by increasing the stakes by making the villain an outright traitor with plans to overthrow King Henry. It also includes Prince Hal, in a role where his historical roistering debauchery is treated as a ruse to conceal his own efforts to uncover the plot while at the same time gives him the chance to advance the fortunes of young Myles. The book was very informative regarding the training, habits, and mores of that era in English history. It also appears on recommended reading lists of great literature.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lara Lee

    A knight's tale This was a very straightforward story of a boy becoming a successful knight and doing great deeds. It is fun, historical, and easy to read. I enjoyed it even though it was not very complicated in character development or plot.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    This is the the coming of age story of Myles Falworth, the son of a nobleman who supported the wrong king, making the new King Henry IV royally annoyed and sending the family into hiding until Myles grew up enough to become a squire and then a knight, and then a seasoned warrior who could challenge the family's chief enemy, the Earl of Alban. Myles supporters includes Henry IV's son, Prince Hal, with a brief digression into the disagreements of father and son from an interesting perspective. Alo This is the the coming of age story of Myles Falworth, the son of a nobleman who supported the wrong king, making the new King Henry IV royally annoyed and sending the family into hiding until Myles grew up enough to become a squire and then a knight, and then a seasoned warrior who could challenge the family's chief enemy, the Earl of Alban. Myles supporters includes Henry IV's son, Prince Hal, with a brief digression into the disagreements of father and son from an interesting perspective. Along the way, Myles of course meets the young noblewoman who he loves in at first a Platonic way, becomes her knight, and later seeks her hand in marriage. As a young adult novel of a previous generation, there are moral questions to be dealt with, since Myles has engaged in a battle to the death with his family's foe. Was it moral to kill him? It's interesting that Pyle felt it necessary to ask. What sets this book apart from the herd is its wonderful employment of middle English speech to give the story a wonderful feel of medieval English life. I suspect the language is more Shakespearean than English of the 1400s, but it's still a pleasure to read. And I think I'll take to calling my secluded backyard my "pleasance."

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jack Massa

    Enjoyable YA adventure, set at the height of the age of chivalry, but written with the stong moral force (and occasional moralizing) of the Victorian era.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Emma Grace

    DNF

  7. 5 out of 5

    Colleen

    Men Of Iron, Howard Pyle Wow, what a great little book! It centers around a young man, Myles Falworth, who is unwittingly caught up in the political intrigue during the transition from King Richard II to King Henry the IV. The new king follows the tradition of taking out the colleagues of his predecessor. As a boy Myles' father is blinded, exiled, and still wanted for treason for aiding and harboring a loyalist to the former king during this time. His family finds protection and anonymity and he Men Of Iron, Howard Pyle Wow, what a great little book! It centers around a young man, Myles Falworth, who is unwittingly caught up in the political intrigue during the transition from King Richard II to King Henry the IV. The new king follows the tradition of taking out the colleagues of his predecessor. As a boy Myles' father is blinded, exiled, and still wanted for treason for aiding and harboring a loyalist to the former king during this time. His family finds protection and anonymity and he grows up a peasant until his father sends him away to a former friend who still has power in the government to enter into his service and attain knighthood. Eventually with help and guidance (unknown to him at first) he becomes a knight and avenges his father's honor and estate. I love tales of revenge. Especially righteous revenge. But it's not just a revenge story. It's a classic "coming of age" tale that focuses on middle age chivalry. Myles is studied as he grows from his more naive and impressionable outlook on what is honorable and right to a more mature viewpoint. His boldness is helped by the fact that he's favored by his lord and master so his youthful ideals are validated. There's the disappointment of realizing that the facts of life aren't' as simple and black and white as he assumes in his youth, but he never becomes cynical as he learns to deal with the complexities of coming into his own. He remains pure at heart and heroically turns the fortunes of his own family and that of his benefactors' as well. What really loved was the details of life at the time period. His time spent as a squire, the rigors of the work, and the fromal social interactions are historically delicious. His knighthood ceremony where he is finally inducted into the Order of the Bath by the king he was soon to defy is regarded as a nonfictional account of the proceedings. It's packed full of a lot of details and intensity for what is actually a short novelette. At times it seems too short, but classic literature was specially gifted for keeping things simple while unfolding a great yarn. I loved and if this is any indication of how Pyle's other works are, I'll be checking out more of them.

  8. 5 out of 5

    ladydusk

    Own as Audio CD read by Jim Weiss. I hope to change to the correct edition soon ... We listened to Men of Iron on a long trip. We enjoyed the story; the exploits and doings of Myles Falworth were exciting. His maturation throughout the book was well done - from foolish boy to brave, wise knight. His foolish misunderstandings were brought on, at least partially, from the lack of information the adults in his life gave him. Yet, the revelations of friendship, enemy, and history all moved the plot a Own as Audio CD read by Jim Weiss. I hope to change to the correct edition soon ... We listened to Men of Iron on a long trip. We enjoyed the story; the exploits and doings of Myles Falworth were exciting. His maturation throughout the book was well done - from foolish boy to brave, wise knight. His foolish misunderstandings were brought on, at least partially, from the lack of information the adults in his life gave him. Yet, the revelations of friendship, enemy, and history all moved the plot along. Much of the story of Myles' training revolved around his character, both the good and the bad. He was a natural leader, yet sometimes his leadership caused more trouble than necessary. Perhaps our children were a little young for this. In some ways, the story was nuanced and the language difficult for them. We did have to explain what was going on in several places. They all insisted, however, that they liked the story, and since we own it, can listen again in the future. While we generally enjoy Jim Weiss and his CDs, this one seemed less professional than we've come to expect. There were places where obvious corrections were made that were distracting to the adult listener.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Terri

    This classic novel of knights in shining armour, British Kings, and jousting is really great literature. I'd give it 4 1/2 stars if I could. Don't get me wrong, this is isn't a thrill a minute. It is actually quite slow and methodical. But, I learned a lot about how people became knights and what they were required to do, and I enjoyed a coming-of-age adventure story at the same time. Myles Falworth is a boy of 16 when he is sent to a nearby castle learn how to become a knight. I didn't like him This classic novel of knights in shining armour, British Kings, and jousting is really great literature. I'd give it 4 1/2 stars if I could. Don't get me wrong, this is isn't a thrill a minute. It is actually quite slow and methodical. But, I learned a lot about how people became knights and what they were required to do, and I enjoyed a coming-of-age adventure story at the same time. Myles Falworth is a boy of 16 when he is sent to a nearby castle learn how to become a knight. I didn't like him much at first...he is cocky and stubborn and gets himself into trouble often. But, slowly, Myles learns to hold his temper and becomes a great knight of the 14th century. The story interested me enough, that I did some follow-up reading after I finished the book yesterday about King Richard II, King Henry IV, and King Henry V. Excellent writing with some beautiful comments by Howard Pyle about growing up as a boy in that age.

  10. 4 out of 5

    John Beach

    This is a wonderful "Boys' Book." I read it decades ago, and it still appeals to this 50-year-old boy, perhaps because it makes me first like that young lad I was in the early 1970s. That is it's greatest strength, I feel; it captures and romanticizes knighthood in the time of King Henry IV for impressionable boys of all ages. There are clear cut villains and characters of nobel heart. Certainly meant for young adults, it is a coming-of-age story, and did, not doubt, help to shape the man I event This is a wonderful "Boys' Book." I read it decades ago, and it still appeals to this 50-year-old boy, perhaps because it makes me first like that young lad I was in the early 1970s. That is it's greatest strength, I feel; it captures and romanticizes knighthood in the time of King Henry IV for impressionable boys of all ages. There are clear cut villains and characters of nobel heart. Certainly meant for young adults, it is a coming-of-age story, and did, not doubt, help to shape the man I eventually grew into. It is also a pretty good 1954 movie starring Tony Curtis, "The Black Shield of Falworth," although the movie uses characters who really are too old, and skips most of the youthful boy stories that come early in the book. I would love to see this remade to feature youthful British actors.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Michael Jones

    You have to like reading books in King James English to like this. If you do, it's a lot of fun. Available on librivox but with many different readers. That can be good as you hear different people struggle with the Elizabethan prose. This book definitely picks up on how young people were shaped in the code of chivalry and honor that existed at the time. But God created Myles As someone who had this intense sense of honor right in his bones. Honor on steroids (pardon the humorous analogy). As a C You have to like reading books in King James English to like this. If you do, it's a lot of fun. Available on librivox but with many different readers. That can be good as you hear different people struggle with the Elizabethan prose. This book definitely picks up on how young people were shaped in the code of chivalry and honor that existed at the time. But God created Myles As someone who had this intense sense of honor right in his bones. Honor on steroids (pardon the humorous analogy). As a Christian, I'm not sure I can place the family honor and fighting for my father's name on such a high plane. Sometimes I struggled because Myles doesn't always love his neighbor as himself. This worldview and timeframe has much to teach us, but I wouldn't want my son to grow up here.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sylvester

    Knights and squires, tournaments and jousting - Pyle handles his subject with ease, adding authenticity with his use of Old English words and phrases. I especially appreciate the skill with which he paces the story, unhurried, taking time to build the tale, and never overdoing the description. He makes it look easy.

  13. 5 out of 5

    James

    It is always nice to read/listen to an young reader's book once in a while. I love stories of pages and knights. Fiction or nonfiction. A nice book which to return to earlier years.

  14. 4 out of 5

    G.M. Burrow

    Lovely, predictable, knightly stuff.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    Written in formal language meant I was able to stay in the story and not jump between modern cultural norms and historical setting. I have never heard of this book other than it was recommended by a trusted source as a book to inspire valuable character in young readers. Myles Falworth is not without faults but the good in him is definitely more. His loyalty to true friends, honor to his parents, work ethic, sense of honor, and a desire to see plainly the fault and baseness in the debauchery he Written in formal language meant I was able to stay in the story and not jump between modern cultural norms and historical setting. I have never heard of this book other than it was recommended by a trusted source as a book to inspire valuable character in young readers. Myles Falworth is not without faults but the good in him is definitely more. His loyalty to true friends, honor to his parents, work ethic, sense of honor, and a desire to see plainly the fault and baseness in the debauchery he witnessed when a knight in battle are all admirable. Yes, this is a book I want my children to read. These are words and ideas and ideals I want them to encounter in a fictional setting so as to recognize them in real life. I'm grateful for the recommendation and will return to the list again.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    It took me some time to get into this book, but once I did, I found it to be rather enjoyable. The narration is written in an Olde English style, and that takes a bit to become accustomed to, but once one puts forth the effort, it possess that magic to transport one to another time and place. Many a time I thought to myself while reading, "Don Quixote would be most proud of me to know that I am engaging in the further perusal of Knights Errantry". And of course.. "So Miles was….., for how else sh It took me some time to get into this book, but once I did, I found it to be rather enjoyable. The narration is written in an Olde English style, and that takes a bit to become accustomed to, but once one puts forth the effort, it possess that magic to transport one to another time and place. Many a time I thought to myself while reading, "Don Quixote would be most proud of me to know that I am engaging in the further perusal of Knights Errantry". And of course.. "So Miles was….., for how else shall the story end?

  17. 5 out of 5

    Bee

    When life gets too stressful and you can't stomach one more day of bad news or viral video of horror among the members of the human race, download this audio book, put in your ear buds and sit back for a relaxing ride. Immerse yourself in that simpler time complete with Olde English jargon. These are days of chivalry when hard work mixes seamlessly with a bit of mischief and it's all good. Don't worry. Your Facebook feed will still be there when you return to the 21st Century. But you'll be the When life gets too stressful and you can't stomach one more day of bad news or viral video of horror among the members of the human race, download this audio book, put in your ear buds and sit back for a relaxing ride. Immerse yourself in that simpler time complete with Olde English jargon. These are days of chivalry when hard work mixes seamlessly with a bit of mischief and it's all good. Don't worry. Your Facebook feed will still be there when you return to the 21st Century. But you'll be the better for your brief foray into the past.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Anduril81

    Somewhat fun, old-school "boy's own adventure" stuff of the sort that would never be published today. Characters are pretty broad, not tons of depth, but not cartoons either. Pacing uneven. The big draw is Pyle's skill at description and his unabashed love for the subject. Not bad, but I believe I can see why Robin Hood made him famous. Modern whiny readers beware: this work is full to bursting with Victorian-style Elizabethan vernacular, especially in the dialogue.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Shonn Haren

    Another bedtime read for the kids. Miles Falworth is the son of an outlawed lord, who must pass through arduous training to become a knight to avenge his father and regain his family's honor. Pyle has a bad habit of telling instead of showing and is wordy (as might be expected from a Victorian era author.). That said, the story is fun and interesting, and heck any story that begins with a guy dashing another man's brains out with a mace is likely ot grab your attention.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Brandon

    Loved it! We started this as an audiobook in the car with the kids on a short road trip, but that only got us about a third of the way through. Then I read aloud the rest of it to the kids in the evenings. It was a great coming of age story for a spunky boy who grows to be a knight. Filled with chivalrous adventure and a very exciting ending. But most of all I loved the beautiful older English language. The kids loved it too.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chris O'Neil

    Not an exemplar of Chivalry Though very popular, I personally would NOT slip this book into the reading list of a young boy. He might enjoy it, as many have over the years, but it really lacks in a moral code of conduct.

  22. 4 out of 5

    shannon Stubbs

    I loved it I loved the story. I found out about this story from reading an excerpt from daughter's school reading book. When I found out there was more to the story I had to read the rest. I fell in love with Myles and his friend Gascoyne.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Stan

    The book that became the movie - The Black Shield of Falworth. Loved the movie when I was a kid. Enjoyed the novel as an adult. I don't consider it the finest writing due to style, but the story is enjoyable. It is worth the read. I hope you enjoy it as much as I have over the years!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Joshua

    This is a great book for children. A genuinely intriguing story with admirable characters.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Diana

    This is the story of a young man's journey to knighthood. I enjoyed it and my 13yr old boys loved it.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Definitely enjoyed this more than the pirate collection. An interesting story with a lot of details about the period. I would be curious to know the research to know how accurate those details were.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    Pyle is one of my top 5 favorite authors. I adore his tales of King Arthur and Robin Hood, so my expectations fell flat on this one.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mollie Crummey

    Fantastic tale of chivalry and adventure. A wonderful, action-packed read aloud for my 8 & 9 yr olds.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    Great story full of manly character lessons. Strong main character with good values.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brent Huntsman

    Great read on Knights and medieval chivalry. The story of a young boys dream to become a Knight.

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