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The Lonely Men

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In The Lonely Men, Louis L’Amour spins the tale of a man who must elude an Apache trap—only to discover that his greatest enemy might be very close to home. Tell Sackett had fought his share of Indians and managed to take something of value from his battles: a deep and abiding respect. But that respect is lost when Apache braves kidnap his nephew, forcing Tell to cross the In The Lonely Men, Louis L’Amour spins the tale of a man who must elude an Apache trap—only to discover that his greatest enemy might be very close to home. Tell Sackett had fought his share of Indians and managed to take something of value from his battles: a deep and abiding respect. But that respect is lost when Apache braves kidnap his nephew, forcing Tell to cross the border into the Sierra Madres to bring the boy back. What troubles Tell more, though, is the boy’s mother: Could she possibly be inventing a rescue mission to deliver her husband’s brother into an ambush? Tell knows that the only things he can depend on are his wits and cold steel. But against such adversaries, even these formidable weapons may not be enough.


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In The Lonely Men, Louis L’Amour spins the tale of a man who must elude an Apache trap—only to discover that his greatest enemy might be very close to home. Tell Sackett had fought his share of Indians and managed to take something of value from his battles: a deep and abiding respect. But that respect is lost when Apache braves kidnap his nephew, forcing Tell to cross the In The Lonely Men, Louis L’Amour spins the tale of a man who must elude an Apache trap—only to discover that his greatest enemy might be very close to home. Tell Sackett had fought his share of Indians and managed to take something of value from his battles: a deep and abiding respect. But that respect is lost when Apache braves kidnap his nephew, forcing Tell to cross the border into the Sierra Madres to bring the boy back. What troubles Tell more, though, is the boy’s mother: Could she possibly be inventing a rescue mission to deliver her husband’s brother into an ambush? Tell knows that the only things he can depend on are his wits and cold steel. But against such adversaries, even these formidable weapons may not be enough.

30 review for The Lonely Men

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jacob Proffitt

    I'm rating this one down and I'm man enough to admit that it's mostly pique. The story is good and I've always liked Tell Sackett. This is the third featuring him and L'Amour is a better storyteller with each new book. The only trouble is, the first book featuring Tell ended with him together with Ange. And I adore Ange. So in the previous Tell book, L'Amour had to pack her off back East for some mysterious reason and that sucked. In this one, L'Amour kills her off. Off-screen, in the pre-story, I'm rating this one down and I'm man enough to admit that it's mostly pique. The story is good and I've always liked Tell Sackett. This is the third featuring him and L'Amour is a better storyteller with each new book. The only trouble is, the first book featuring Tell ended with him together with Ange. And I adore Ange. So in the previous Tell book, L'Amour had to pack her off back East for some mysterious reason and that sucked. In this one, L'Amour kills her off. Off-screen, in the pre-story, in a big dustup that he may have intended to get to sometime but apparently never has (because I'm reading in chronological order, remember***). And that just sucks! And yeah, I like Dorset, the new honey for Tell, but she's awful thin on the pages in this one, floating in and out of the story just enough to hint at her inner awesome. This is the problem with being a romantic reading the Sackett novels, I suppose... Even worse, though, we get more of Owen's not-yet-ex wife, Laura. She's a cartoon villain from Tyrel's story and does herself no favors here. Her machinations drive much of the story, sending Tell into Apache territory on a goose-chase. I can't actually regret it because he rescues folks and meets Dorset, but still, she's a stone-cold bitch and seriously needs to go away (preferably permanently, though not necessarily fatally). So yeah. Pique. It's still a good adventure story and Tell is awesome. Poor Ange. If L'Amour has similar treatment for Dorset later on, I may just give this up as a bad experiment... ***Edit: well crap! It turns out the series listing here on GoodReads isn't in chronological order. Gah. So looks like I need an emergency intervention for The Sackett Brand. This may sour me on L'Amour, altogether... ****Edited Edit: I changed the ordering here on GoodReads to reflect the much better chronology given at http://www.louislamour.com/sackett/in.... Future generations shouldn't so much thank me as erect statues and possibly instantiate a small cult...

  2. 5 out of 5

    Patrice

    My husband likes westerns so we picked up this Louis L`Amour audio book for a long car ride we were taking. It is part of the Sackett brothers` saga. This was well written and well read . I could picture the action in my mind as it unfolded. This story focuses on Willian Tell Sackett, Tell. He is lucky to be alive after an ambush and while recuperating at the nearset town is approached by a woman that says she is his sister-in-law. She asks Tell to go after her son, his nephew, after he was kidn My husband likes westerns so we picked up this Louis L`Amour audio book for a long car ride we were taking. It is part of the Sackett brothers` saga. This was well written and well read . I could picture the action in my mind as it unfolded. This story focuses on Willian Tell Sackett, Tell. He is lucky to be alive after an ambush and while recuperating at the nearset town is approached by a woman that says she is his sister-in-law. She asks Tell to go after her son, his nephew, after he was kidnapped by indians during a raid.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Brent

    My wife and I go to Chicago every year and somehow it became a tradition for me to read a L'Amour book on the train ride up there. It was a great trip and a great story.

  4. 5 out of 5

    An Odd1

    "Sacketts were a right stubborn folk. We just didn't have much give-up in us. We always kept plugging away, and that's what I was doing this time" p 196. "Now my pappy was always one for figuring things .. when in difficulty a body should always take time to contemplate. The only way folks got to where they are .. was by thinkin' things out. No man ever had the claws of a grizzly nor the speed of a deer -- what he had was a brain" p 201. William Tell Sackett narrates fight few survive, more trag "Sacketts were a right stubborn folk. We just didn't have much give-up in us. We always kept plugging away, and that's what I was doing this time" p 196. "Now my pappy was always one for figuring things .. when in difficulty a body should always take time to contemplate. The only way folks got to where they are .. was by thinkin' things out. No man ever had the claws of a grizzly nor the speed of a deer -- what he had was a brain" p 201. William Tell Sackett narrates fight few survive, more tragedy than humor in this story. Billy Higgins "lying out in the glare of the sun .. gut-shot and dying and the apaches were shooting flaming slivers of pitch into your hide" p 231 begs Tell for release. Tell frees "too good a fightin' man to kill" p 115, "scar on his cheekbone" p 126 is "Kahtenny, one of the most dangerous and elusive Apaches .. down and helpless" p 127. From Yuma to Tucson, Tell rides with John J. Battles "deputy marshal for a time .. steadier with a gun than I should have been" p 205, Spanish Murphy "tall as me but twenty pounds lighter than my one-ninety .. alwas a-reading" p 116, and Tampico Rocca "mother was an Apache" p 117. The four "sweated and thirsted together, we had hungered and fought, and eaten trail dust together; so now we rode as brothers ride" p 123. They are not well distinguished from another, helps see them as a unit. In the Quartz Rock Saloon were men "born with the bark on .. so rough they wore their clothes out from the inside first" p 131. Tell bluffs down Arch Hadden and "greaser" insult against Rocca. Worst enemy is lying Laura Pitts Sackett "strikingly pretty young woman, blond and fragile .. pale, delicate flower, aloof, serene, untouchable ..husband .. Congressman Orrin .. separated" p 119. Angry divorceé invents son, kidnapped with Creed boys to Mexico, certain death, hires Hadden to bring "proof" p 176 Tell dead. Pals try to convince Tell "you've been lied to" p 171. Although "almost certain .. wild-goose chase .. Sacketts treated womenfolk gentle, even when they didn't deserve it" p 180. Sonora "desert is the enemy of the careless .. signs which indicate where water .. flight of bees or birds, the tracks of small animals, the kind of plants" p 141. "I could hear a quail call . . . I hoped it was a real quail" p 210. Glimpsed "buzzards do not always wait for a man to die .. headin' into trouble" p 211. Dorset Binny "cutest button of a girl you ever laid eyes on .. scarcely more than five feet tall and wore a buckskin .. quick and pert" p 163 comes for her sister. Tell goes back for Harry Brook, lost few years longer. Amid torture, Spanish adapts "old songs" p 165 to warn Tell away. (view spoiler)[Tell rides in, both ride out. (hide spoiler)] With Battles "both almighty tired .. kept on, because neither of us was smart enough to quit" p 214. Laura ensures troubles keep coming. A lynch mob invades a prison cell. Suprise twist combines enemy and savior. Haddens take Kahtenny's squaw to force Kahtenny to kill Tell. (view spoiler)[ Kahtenny "think somehow it is a trick" p 217, lets Tell rescue squaw. Tell's bullet to Billy's head is ammunition for Laura to misinterpret alongside decades ago Higgins-Sackett hill feud. Captain Lewiston arrests Tell for Billy's murder. Only Dorset and kids make it back. Battles, Rocca, Spanish - all die painfully. Laura, to blame, denies her lies. In cell, "nothing there that would make a weapon except the frame of the cot, which was a half-inch pipe. So I just wrenched the cot clear .. unscrew two sections of it, one about seven feet long, the other .. three .. with an elbow" p 234 "jammed that pipe into the crowd beyond the bars" p 235 "a bad man to corner .. put four men in bed .. and injured six or seven more" p 236. Sheriff returns with Kahtenny's testimony, clears Tell of Billy's murder. Laura ambushes Tell outside town. Kahtenny takes Hadden but she goes scot-free. "It came on me to sing, but my horse was carrying me along nicely, and I was not wishful for trouble. The End" p 241. (hide spoiler)]

  5. 5 out of 5

    Scott Lyson

    Each of us in his own way wars against change. Even those who fancy themselves the most progressive will fight against other kinds of progress, for each of us is convinced that our way is the best way.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dennis

    Of all the Sacketts, Tell is my favorite. As with all of his books, Louis L'Amour grabs you from the first page, and you don't want to let go of the reading experience until you've finished the book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dan Donovan

    Horse opera at its' best Tried and true formula book by a master of the genre, a true story teller. Never ready a really lousy book by Louis Lamour, just simple adventure tales full of larger than life heroes.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kayla

    I enjoyed reading this book. Another one about Tell Sackett; the poor guy never catches a break and trouble always finds him. Hopefully he'll get his happy ending soon.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Caden Rowley

    The Lonely Men is a western style thriller written by Louis L’amour. The book starts out as Tell Sackett is pinned down by the Apaches in a land so bare that there isn’t anything around him except for barren desert. He escapes and moves on to a little town called Tucson where his Sister in law, Laura Sackett tells him that his nephew has been kidnapped by the Apaches and asks him to go into the heart of Apache territory to find him. Will he make it out alive and with his nephew or will he die al The Lonely Men is a western style thriller written by Louis L’amour. The book starts out as Tell Sackett is pinned down by the Apaches in a land so bare that there isn’t anything around him except for barren desert. He escapes and moves on to a little town called Tucson where his Sister in law, Laura Sackett tells him that his nephew has been kidnapped by the Apaches and asks him to go into the heart of Apache territory to find him. Will he make it out alive and with his nephew or will he die all alone in the desolate desert? The Lonely Men is a very good book. I think this book is valuable because it has a unique plot. It seems to me that there aren't as many western books as their are other genres so it makes this book a small treasure. The only slow part was when he was in Tucson waiting for his sister in law I thought that part was particularly slow. One part that I really liked about this book was the author's perspective about Native Americans. He didn’t portray them as people with feathers in their headbands who were primitive and inferior to the white settlers. He made them equals to the main characters. This book has a wonderful way of connecting to the reader. In the book some of Tell’s close friends die. We have all had a friend or family member pass away and this connected perfectly to the sadness that followed. This book left me satisfied with the ending and happy with the overall book. The theme of this book is that through perseverance and hard work we can achieve what we set out to do. One example of this is when Tell has to ride multiple days and nights without sleep. Part of which was in the whipping rain and then in the scalding heat of the day to escape from the Apaches. It would have been much easier to have not gone at all or to have given up when things got tough, but he didn't. He didn’t back down and he achieved what he set out to do. This doesn't only apply to the book it also applies to real life. If you stick with it you will succeed.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Lee Wood

    FOUR FRIENDS This adventure has a good side and bad side. William Tell Sackett, and friends Tampico, Spanish Murphy, John J. Battles these men accompanied Tell thru Apache country to rescue his nephew who per his sister in law Laura Pritts Sackett was kidnapped to Mexico. This was a lie, the sister in law was angry with Tell's brother Orrin, a lawyer who moved back to Washington, D.C. Of course Tell wasn't aware of this situation, since he didn't write much, better still he had a hard time readin FOUR FRIENDS This adventure has a good side and bad side. William Tell Sackett, and friends Tampico, Spanish Murphy, John J. Battles these men accompanied Tell thru Apache country to rescue his nephew who per his sister in law Laura Pritts Sackett was kidnapped to Mexico. This was a lie, the sister in law was angry with Tell's brother Orrin, a lawyer who moved back to Washington, D.C. Of course Tell wasn't aware of this situation, since he didn't write much, better still he had a hard time reading, which was uncommon in that era. Especially if your families main concern is to keep food on the table and a roof over their families head, education wasn't the families first priority. Tell rescued four white kids from the Apache mountain retreat. One of the kids was with the Apache for two years, he told Tell what he saw and there wasn't any young boy he was looking for in this village. Well now that they've rescued the kids, the return trip will be a true test of the strength of these four hard living men. Tell eventually makes it to a ranch owned a Mexican Don, who gives them all a safe sanctuary. That's when he's told that he was sent to his death, because there wasn't any kidnapped nephew...Tell felt there was something wrong, but couldn't understand why Orrin's ex-wife wanted him dead. On that note, this is a great western story by the greatest western writer, Louis L'Amour....cha cha. Exposes how deep anger, hatred goes and how it feeds the fire of REVENGE. He gives you both sides of the coin..you know..The Indians side and the White men; why they are having a hard time accepting change, which is coming whether they agree or not..Lots of helpful history if you want to believe it or not..Mr L'Amour preserves what he has seen through his travels, and pass it on to the readers....

  11. 4 out of 5

    Oleta Blaylock

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I swear if it wasn't for bad luck William Tell Sackett wouldn't have any luck at all. The man can get into more trouble in less time than any two other men. He is also a little to trusting of women. That is probably because he hasn't had much experience with them. However, Orrin has had quite a bit of experience with woman and he isn't any better at seeing through their wiles. Tell is approached by Orrin's ex-wife Laura and she tells him that Orrin's son has been kidnapped by the Apaches. Tell se I swear if it wasn't for bad luck William Tell Sackett wouldn't have any luck at all. The man can get into more trouble in less time than any two other men. He is also a little to trusting of women. That is probably because he hasn't had much experience with them. However, Orrin has had quite a bit of experience with woman and he isn't any better at seeing through their wiles. Tell is approached by Orrin's ex-wife Laura and she tells him that Orrin's son has been kidnapped by the Apaches. Tell sets out to find the boy and bring him home. At this point in time most of the Apaches were holing up in Mexico in the Sierra Madres. It is a dangerous mission but Tell just can't leave the boy to fin for himself. The story is one running battle with the Apaches. It doesn't help that Laura Pritts Sackett is coming up with more ways for Tell to die. She is determined to get him killed. This is one mean spirited woman there isn't a single good bone in her body. As with the other Tell Sackett stories I enjoyed this one. I love learning about the different countrysides that he travels through as well as the history of the time. I also appreciate that L'Amour never paints the Indian as an evil man. He is just a man that has been raised with a different set of values. All the Sacketts believe this and they talk about it through all the books. I would like to see Tell finally find some peace. He has been through so much and deserves to find a happy and fruitful life.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jean

    This is another book in the Sackett series and features Tell Sackett. Unlike today, news travels slowly and Tell doesn't know that the ex-wife of Orrin Sackett is "ex" and out to make sure Sacketts suffer. So when she informs Tell there's a young Sackett who has been kidnapped by Apaches, he believes her and off he goes. It is a fun book, full of adventure and wonderful descriptions of the land. Tell is one of my favorite Sackett characters and his observations are always interesting. The only p This is another book in the Sackett series and features Tell Sackett. Unlike today, news travels slowly and Tell doesn't know that the ex-wife of Orrin Sackett is "ex" and out to make sure Sacketts suffer. So when she informs Tell there's a young Sackett who has been kidnapped by Apaches, he believes her and off he goes. It is a fun book, full of adventure and wonderful descriptions of the land. Tell is one of my favorite Sackett characters and his observations are always interesting. The only problem is the book is short! It tells the story, though. It is just me wanting to spend more time there. If you like traditional Westerns, you've probably already read this book. If you haven't, then pick it up; you'll enjoy it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Josh English

    I picked these up from a used bookstore along with a couple of other westerns. This is not one of usual genres but I have a notion the western hero is part of a chain leading to the great hardboiled detectives. This story is about Tell Sackett on a suicide fission to rescue a nephew he doesn't have from the Apaches in Mexico. He survives and despite killing several Apache warriors he does not hate them. He respects them as a people and as strong fighters. with has sore disdain for the asshole wh I picked these up from a used bookstore along with a couple of other westerns. This is not one of usual genres but I have a notion the western hero is part of a chain leading to the great hardboiled detectives. This story is about Tell Sackett on a suicide fission to rescue a nephew he doesn't have from the Apaches in Mexico. He survives and despite killing several Apache warriors he does not hate them. He respects them as a people and as strong fighters. with has sore disdain for the asshole whites he deals with in Tuscon and even at the end when he encounters the woman who lied to him and tried to wave him illegal, his own honor code does not allow him to seek revenge.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Conrad

    Decent but unexceptional Western. Part of the Sackett series, this volume follows the adventures of Tel Sackett as he attempts to rescue a nephew from Apache country. What most interested me in this work are the two half-baked theories L’Amour throws out to defend his pro-Cowboy stance. Tel muses that Apaches drove a tribe out of their territory to occupy the land they currently hold, so it is the way of history for the white man to drive the Indians out. One of Tell’s unflappable comrades posit Decent but unexceptional Western. Part of the Sackett series, this volume follows the adventures of Tel Sackett as he attempts to rescue a nephew from Apache country. What most interested me in this work are the two half-baked theories L’Amour throws out to defend his pro-Cowboy stance. Tel muses that Apaches drove a tribe out of their territory to occupy the land they currently hold, so it is the way of history for the white man to drive the Indians out. One of Tell’s unflappable comrades posits the other theory, that the Indian’s undoing was their desire for the white man’s commerce, not, say, his genocidal tendencies.

  15. 5 out of 5

    David Miller

    A great read (or listen, in this case; the audiobook reader did a great job). Tell Sackett was a major figure of my youth, from reading "The Sackett Brand", but as a boy I never read his other adventure. The is more intricate than the earlier book. L'Amour shows how the Sackett family character can be used against them. The sense of place is very good: I loved the descriptions of the places, the sounds, the smells, the heat. I liked all the characters; even the villain is somewhat three-dimension A great read (or listen, in this case; the audiobook reader did a great job). Tell Sackett was a major figure of my youth, from reading "The Sackett Brand", but as a boy I never read his other adventure. The is more intricate than the earlier book. L'Amour shows how the Sackett family character can be used against them. The sense of place is very good: I loved the descriptions of the places, the sounds, the smells, the heat. I liked all the characters; even the villain is somewhat three-dimensional. I liked the concreteness and earthiness; everything is very specific: particular towns, ranches, mines, mountains, all described precisely and economically.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Mizzen

    Two great quotes from this book: "We were men with sorrows behind us, and battles too; men with regrets behind us of which we did not speak; nor too often think. With none to share our sorrows or regrets, we kept them to ourselves, and our faces were impassive. Men with no one to share their feelings learn to conceal those feelings. We often spoke lightly of things which we took very seriously indeed." "Most men are alone...We come into life alone, we face our worst troubles alone, and we are alon Two great quotes from this book: "We were men with sorrows behind us, and battles too; men with regrets behind us of which we did not speak; nor too often think. With none to share our sorrows or regrets, we kept them to ourselves, and our faces were impassive. Men with no one to share their feelings learn to conceal those feelings. We often spoke lightly of things which we took very seriously indeed." "Most men are alone...We come into life alone, we face our worst troubles alone, and we are alone when we die."

  17. 5 out of 5

    Shawn

    L’amour is consistent, and consistently good. The Sackett novels follow a formula, more or less, but the formula works and L’Amour is the master at it. He does a great job of crafting masculine characters that are honorable, act with integrity and decency towards all. Tell has great respect for the Apache. Like most Sackett heroes, he treats women as equals. He faces danger, bravely of course, but also thoughtfully.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kerrie

    I enjoy a good western. There is no problem distinguishing between the good guy and the bad guy. The main character in this book, The Lonely Men, is Tell Sackett who is sent on a dangerous wild goose chase by a sister-in-law who only wants revenge. The sights, sounds, smells are wonderfully described. The tension, adventure, characters are well developed. I would recommend this to people who enjoy westerns.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Peter Pactor

    Louis L'Amour is one of my favorite authors, but there were times during the reading that I felt the story became a little tedious to read. I kept thinking let's get to where we're going. If seemed to me like he was working too hard to make everything in the story fit together—an unusual experience in a Louis L'Amour book. Still I enjoyed the book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Violet

    Love this series on the Sacketts; one of the families who moved from the east to the west in the 1800's. In this one, Tell Sackett has to deal not only with Apaches but also his ex sister-in-law who wants him dead. Great entertainment.

  21. 5 out of 5

    James

    Not a bad read. Full of cliches and the main character often repeats himself, when he's taking breaks from talking about some virtuous aspect of his family. It's a tight story, but goes wonky at the end. Still, I enjoyed it most of the way through.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Malia

    Love Louis L'Amour books! In this one Tell Sackett gos to find a child who he was related to. Typical battles occurs.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Thomas C.Curtis

    This wasnt what I was expecting, but I did thoroughly enjoy it. I do love the simplicity of the writing. This wasn´t what I was expecting, but I did thoroughly enjoy it. I do love the simplicity of the writing.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mr Ian R Diggles

    A good read Following the titles to keep the history. Correct. Another good read in this genre. Well worth. The cost and can keep it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Greg Edwards

    Favorite I enjoy reading Louis L'Amour books. Sacketts is a great series!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Not the best L'Amour book I've read but not bad either.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    The series is just good, not much I can say about the story without giving it away, so I will just say that this was a good read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    So good, lots of action, so well written.

  29. 5 out of 5

    matthew m mason

    Not the best. Not the best of the series, but still enjoyable. The sackett legend continues to grow albeit it's getting a little far fetched at times.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Melody

    Really good story ..

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