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Content Rules: How to Create Killer Blogs, Podcasts, Videos, eBooks, Webinars (and More) That Engage Customers and Ignite Your Business

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The guide to creating engaging web content and building a loyal following, revised and updated Blogs, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and other platforms are giving everyone a "voice," including organizations and their customers. So how do you create the stories, videos, and blog posts that cultivate fans, arouse passion for your products or services, and ignite your The guide to creating engaging web content and building a loyal following, revised and updated Blogs, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and other platforms are giving everyone a "voice," including organizations and their customers. So how do you create the stories, videos, and blog posts that cultivate fans, arouse passion for your products or services, and ignite your business? Content Rules equips you for online success as a one-stop source on the art and science of developing content that people care about. This coverage is interwoven with case studies of companies successfully spreading their ideas online--and using them to establish credibility and build a loyal customer base. Find an authentic "voice" and craft bold content that will resonate with prospects and buyers and encourage them to share it with others Leverage social media and social tools to get your content and ideas distributed as widely as possible Understand why you are generating content--getting to the meat of your message in practical, commonsense language, and defining the goals of your content strategy Write in a way that powerfully communicates your service, product, or message across various Web mediums Boost your online presence and engage with customers and prospects like never before with Content Rules.


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The guide to creating engaging web content and building a loyal following, revised and updated Blogs, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and other platforms are giving everyone a "voice," including organizations and their customers. So how do you create the stories, videos, and blog posts that cultivate fans, arouse passion for your products or services, and ignite your The guide to creating engaging web content and building a loyal following, revised and updated Blogs, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Google+, and other platforms are giving everyone a "voice," including organizations and their customers. So how do you create the stories, videos, and blog posts that cultivate fans, arouse passion for your products or services, and ignite your business? Content Rules equips you for online success as a one-stop source on the art and science of developing content that people care about. This coverage is interwoven with case studies of companies successfully spreading their ideas online--and using them to establish credibility and build a loyal customer base. Find an authentic "voice" and craft bold content that will resonate with prospects and buyers and encourage them to share it with others Leverage social media and social tools to get your content and ideas distributed as widely as possible Understand why you are generating content--getting to the meat of your message in practical, commonsense language, and defining the goals of your content strategy Write in a way that powerfully communicates your service, product, or message across various Web mediums Boost your online presence and engage with customers and prospects like never before with Content Rules.

30 review for Content Rules: How to Create Killer Blogs, Podcasts, Videos, eBooks, Webinars (and More) That Engage Customers and Ignite Your Business

  1. 5 out of 5

    Cara

    When I picked this up, I knew I was not the intended audience, but I wanted to know "how to create killer podcasts, webinars (and More)." However, the book is way too far out into the land of "hey brick-and-mortar business person! Try this technology! It's neato!" to provide me any useful advice. Ex. How to make killer webinars? Get webinar software, get a really good speaker, plan a topic, invite people, answer questions, make sure it doesn't get screwed up. Yeah, thanks.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Paul DeBusschere

    I gave this book three stars because it has useful information in it about managing a content-based marketing effort, but it fell somewhat short on depth. By the end of the book, I had the feeling it could have been about seventy pages shorter, as the authors were down to repeating ideas over and over (Ideas You Can Steal in each case example). The authors tripped up by stating some rather pedantic rules about words people shouldn't use (like, "leverage." Really?) and fell into using some of the I gave this book three stars because it has useful information in it about managing a content-based marketing effort, but it fell somewhat short on depth. By the end of the book, I had the feeling it could have been about seventy pages shorter, as the authors were down to repeating ideas over and over (Ideas You Can Steal in each case example). The authors tripped up by stating some rather pedantic rules about words people shouldn't use (like, "leverage." Really?) and fell into using some of their own unclear language (Franken-speak is, I'm afraid, Franken-speak). They also tried to be rather cute with profanity, to the book's detriment. Overall, however, the book does offer some useful advice on how to structure and schedule the various content generation efforts that comprise a complete campaign. There are a few helpful pointers and links about some of the tools one can employ to make all of this work without becoming a sleep deprived zombie. So, for the price, not a bad book, but not quite as compelling as it could have been.

  3. 5 out of 5

    C.C.

    I wrote it, so I'm a bit biased, but I like it and can't wait for others to get a chance to read it!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Anabelle Bernard Fournier

    As a web content writer, I can’t pass up a book that promises to help produce killer content for the Web. Thanks to my Kindle, I was able to buy the book and start reading it within seconds. Even though it took me a while to finish it (moving oblige), I’m really glad I did. I loved one of the foundational premises of the book: “marketing can learn a lot from the art and style of storytelling (literature) and the fundamentals and science of good reporting (journalism)” (loc 314). This is a book af As a web content writer, I can’t pass up a book that promises to help produce killer content for the Web. Thanks to my Kindle, I was able to buy the book and start reading it within seconds. Even though it took me a while to finish it (moving oblige), I’m really glad I did. I loved one of the foundational premises of the book: “marketing can learn a lot from the art and style of storytelling (literature) and the fundamentals and science of good reporting (journalism)” (loc 314). This is a book after my own heart–introducing literature in the marketing mix. The book is geared towards businesses and brands, not personal bloggers, but I did get a lot out of it anyway. As I’m trying to get up to date on web marketing and content management, I found the 11 rules the authors lay out simple and comprehensive: Embrace being a publisher Insight inspires originality Build momentum Speak human Reimagine, don’t recycle Share or solve, don’t shill Show, don’t just tell Do something unexpected Stoke the campfire Create wings and roots Play to your strengths The rest of the book is devoted to explaining and demonstrating these 11 rules, first through theory and practical advice and then through several case studies. I appreciated the tutorial style of the book. Instead of focusing on why marketing has changed (a role fulfilled by The New Rules of Marketing & PR), the authors decided to discuss the how: the basic rules to create great content that supports your brand and brings you traffic. Something I found especially useful was the bare bones of an editorial calendar–what to post every day, every week, every month, every quarter and a few times a year. This will come in handy as I work on Molives‘ content strategy. In fact, most of the book is useful: it lays out in simple terms the different ways to produce good content without being prescriptive or preachy. The authors believe that there’s no one-stop solution and that every content strategy must fit the business’s goals. This is not a marketing theory book but rather a how-to. If you’re interested in the theory behind the practice, look at The New Rules and other books about the same topic. There’s plenty of them out there. But if you’re looking for hands-on, practical tips that you can implement right away, Content Rules is a great choice to get started.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Gradon Tripp

    The best, most concrete book on social media tactics I've read yet.

  6. 5 out of 5

    VisforVillains

    Very basic. Definitely fine for someone who is delving into social media for the first time. I think it lost me as soon as it brought in drawings of robots doing various things. I understand that this was supposed to help you remember key ideas, but I found myself irritated by them. And then they were never brought back in the rest of the book. If you are going to introduce a visual element like that, you should at least carry it through. One of the points the book made over and over was to avoid Very basic. Definitely fine for someone who is delving into social media for the first time. I think it lost me as soon as it brought in drawings of robots doing various things. I understand that this was supposed to help you remember key ideas, but I found myself irritated by them. And then they were never brought back in the rest of the book. If you are going to introduce a visual element like that, you should at least carry it through. One of the points the book made over and over was to avoid a "professional" voice, as you need to appear human to identify with your audience. Of course this is important. However, the authors' use of it actually made me identify with them less, as it sometimes felt as if they were trying too hard to be cool and casual. Phrases like "put in your two pesos" bothered me. There were also some strange layout/design choices in this book. Some sections were in grey boxes that, instead of being a tidbit of useful related information, actually went on for pages. The title mentions "how to", yet the book is not telling you how to develop any of the media options it explores in its title (well, it does spend quite a bit of time on webinars, but not much on blogs, etc.). It does give you ideas on how to tailor your content to your audience, as well as how to break it down or splice it together to fit different media styles. Nothing I didn't already know. I seriously learned nothing from this book. Perhaps I have just taken a lot of time to investigate the issues it covers on my own, but much of it seemed like common sense. If you are lost when it comes to scheduling, communicating, and gauging your audience, you could be helped by this book. Otherwise, it would probably be best to pass this one by.

  7. 5 out of 5

    David H Deans

    The forward of this book states that "Marketing is about creating great content" - but that the art and science of producing that superior material has been a mystery to many. David Meerman Scott, the author of the book's forward section, suggests that the answer to the question "what exactly, should I do?" is to tell stories. Granted, that's one important aspect of a forward-looking plan of action. However, perhaps it's essential to fully understand why most businesses tend to create poor conten The forward of this book states that "Marketing is about creating great content" - but that the art and science of producing that superior material has been a mystery to many. David Meerman Scott, the author of the book's forward section, suggests that the answer to the question "what exactly, should I do?" is to tell stories. Granted, that's one important aspect of a forward-looking plan of action. However, perhaps it's essential to fully understand why most businesses tend to create poor content. In fact, much of the business communication that's being produced today clearly doesn't meet the needs of its intended target customer. To the vast majority of marketers, the task of creating content is still centered upon explaining what their product or service does. In contrast, great content -- from the customer's point of view -- should provide meaningful and substantive insight or guidance about what products and service will do for them. As I concluded reading this book, it occurred to me that the authors had not made this point in the most compelling way. I was somewhat disappointed. That said, Ann Hadley and C.C. Chapman have written a very comprehensive guide about how to develop a content marketing strategy and construct interesting information for your intended recipient -- utilizing a variety of digital media in the process. Chapter 6, "Share or Solve; Don't Shill" is -- by far -- the most useful section of this helpful guide. It shares the six characteristics of a good idea or a story. What's missing, in my opinion, are examples of how companies typically fail to incorporate these basic principles. Why is this explanation needed? Because this is a crucial concept and it should not be open to interpretation -- meaning, many marketers must essentially unlearn the common practices of legacy corporate marketing communications organizations. Content Rules includes ten case studies -- what the author's refer to as success stories. I found some of these examples to be very insightful. In summary, the authors have tackled a subject that is very problematic, since knowing what to change is only part of the equation. Executing on that required behavioral transformation, having the will to discard bad habits, has proven to be very challenging. Moreover, for those marketers who find it difficult to adopt these new practices themselves, the likelihood of being able to outsource this task is not promising. Finding an appropriately skilled consultant, a practitioner with proven results, will be equally challenging.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Robyn

    Overall this was an interesting book. There were some useful bits, although I don't think the subtitle is accurate. I didn't feel like the book taught me how to do anything. The content rules concept was great, I loved the point about how content is what motivates purchases, trust, and engagement (not design) and how this should be the primary marketing tool we consider. I agreed with all of part one, found myself going "uh huh uh huh" along with the authors. After a while I realized I was agreei Overall this was an interesting book. There were some useful bits, although I don't think the subtitle is accurate. I didn't feel like the book taught me how to do anything. The content rules concept was great, I loved the point about how content is what motivates purchases, trust, and engagement (not design) and how this should be the primary marketing tool we consider. I agreed with all of part one, found myself going "uh huh uh huh" along with the authors. After a while I realized I was agreeing but not learning. So then I wondered who this book was for. Here is my theory: This book is not for content creators. This book is for our bosses. I believe it is persuasive enough to convince them to prioritize content. So would I recommend you purchase the book? Yes if you're planning on giving it to your boss. If you're looking for a "how to create killer content" book... you may feel it's a bit simplistic. Another note, I borrowed the audio book from my local library so may have lost some of the impact from the case studies because I couldn't see the examples. The authors read the book, which was interesting.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mike Maginot

    I like word play. The title, Content Rules, refers more to the influence your content engenders than it does to any sort of principles you should apply to its creation. The authors provide guidelines for getting the maximum mileage from the content that you, or your organization, generate, but not a fool proof formula for marketing success. What you get here are helpful hints, tips, and case studies. The authors are advocates of reimagining, taking ideas that you might use in a blog and repositio I like word play. The title, Content Rules, refers more to the influence your content engenders than it does to any sort of principles you should apply to its creation. The authors provide guidelines for getting the maximum mileage from the content that you, or your organization, generate, but not a fool proof formula for marketing success. What you get here are helpful hints, tips, and case studies. The authors are advocates of reimagining, taking ideas that you might use in a blog and repositioning them strategically using other social media platforms. For example, your blog gives birth to a series of tweets on Twitter or status updates on Facebook. It then becomes the basis for your YouTube video, but not necessarily in that order. The book offers good common sense advice, the stuff you might learn in a Journalism class. The most important clue the authors wish to convey is the importance of telling a good story in a voice that sounds human, not like a corporate machine. Engaging your audience and being helpful are considered paramount to social media marketing success.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dave Fleet

    Content Rules is a great read for anyone looking to brush up on how to develop effective content that delivers results. The proportion of Content Rules that will be useful to you depends on your knowledge level. The book is divided into three parts; the first covers the absolute basics; the second goes into more depth on specific elements; the final section covers case studies. If you have a reasonable handle on content strategy, you will be able to skip to the second section; meanwhile, even if Content Rules is a great read for anyone looking to brush up on how to develop effective content that delivers results. The proportion of Content Rules that will be useful to you depends on your knowledge level. The book is divided into three parts; the first covers the absolute basics; the second goes into more depth on specific elements; the final section covers case studies. If you have a reasonable handle on content strategy, you will be able to skip to the second section; meanwhile, even if you live and breathe content, the final section of examples will still probably spark some ideas for you. Recommendation: if you're already working in the space, don't force yourself to read through the whole thing - pick and choose, and it will be a useful read for you. Particularly useful sections of the book, for me, were the B2B and webinar chapters - I've already recommended the book to some people for the ideas that they alone will generate.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Don

    This book is packed with great tips and sound principles for content marketers. It goes lightly into the details of how we got here, and heavy on the what to do about it. It describes how marketing has changed due to changes in consumer behavior and does so in a very conversational, easy to read format. Well done!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Daria Steigman

    The early days of the World Wide Web were so much easier. Back in the “old days,” having a Web presence meant putting the equivalent of a corporate brochure online. Web site checked off. On to more pressing marketing tasks. Well, not really— but that was what most companies did. Now every business has to be a publisher, and every company has to have something to say besides “BUY ME.” Content matters. Enter Content Rules. Co-authors Ann Handley and C.C. Chapman have written a bible for savvy entrepren The early days of the World Wide Web were so much easier. Back in the “old days,” having a Web presence meant putting the equivalent of a corporate brochure online. Web site checked off. On to more pressing marketing tasks. Well, not really— but that was what most companies did. Now every business has to be a publisher, and every company has to have something to say besides “BUY ME.” Content matters. Enter Content Rules. Co-authors Ann Handley and C.C. Chapman have written a bible for savvy entrepreneurs and everyone else who understands that good content is a competitive advantage. The point of great content, they say, is: “to convert browsers into buyers and customers into regulars or (better yet) rabid fans, ambassadors, and advocates. You do that by deepening your relationship with them, over time, by repeatedly and consistently creating content they care about and want to share freely with their friends and colleagues, and by encouraging them to engage with you and to sign up for things you publish (like an e-mail newsletter or a webinar) or to download a white paper or an ebook.” The book is divided into three key sections: --Part I looks at the rules for creating great content, including understanding your own business, being helpful rather than shilling your wares and advice for interacting wisely with your audience. --Part II offers how-to chapters on blogging, video, podcasting, photography and more. --Part III has some great case studies from businesses that have successfully implemented content marketing strategies. The best thing about Content Rules is that it’s not intended to sit on a shelf. It’s meant to be actionable— just like all good content. For example, the chapter on blogging covers 12 specific guidelines and includes tips for writing great headlines, advice on tagging and categorizing posts and an “easy-peasy blog post template” that two people at two different companies told me they’ve shared with their internal teams. The chapter on webinars has 25 specific steps to help you create and produce “webinars to ignite your business.” So whether you’re looking to try out something new or just struggling to make what you’re doing do a better job of creating a passionate community around your brand, Content Rules can help.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Paul Mirek

    Handley and Chapman's broad overview of content strategy has stagnated some in the five years since it's been published, but it remains a useful guide to the step-by-step processes necessary for creating engaging results. Most will be able to skip past the first half of the book, which largely consists of curated comments from other experts about the value of investing in content marketing. Today businesses seem much more ready to employ these strategies (at least in the B2B arena where I have t Handley and Chapman's broad overview of content strategy has stagnated some in the five years since it's been published, but it remains a useful guide to the step-by-step processes necessary for creating engaging results. Most will be able to skip past the first half of the book, which largely consists of curated comments from other experts about the value of investing in content marketing. Today businesses seem much more ready to employ these strategies (at least in the B2B arena where I have the most experience). The challenge now is to find effective ways to ramp up content production and capture the various facets of brand personality online. That's why I appreciate tools like the straightforward blog template and guide to webinar creation found here--they encourage participation from team members who might otherwise be intimidated at the thought of "content," and foster an environment of collaborative creation instead of overwhelming a single beleaguered "Content Specialist." Another note: the authors are writing to a more general crowd and therefore avoid extended discussion of specific metrics. However, they do emphasize that these should be agreed on at the start of a project by the group of people responsible for its success. In an updated edition, I would expect this topic to play a larger role. Businesses are starting to recognize the importance of balancing traditional ROI measurements with more tenuous results like "brand loyalty" and "customer lifetime value."

  14. 5 out of 5

    Levi

    In my quest to learn everything I can about social media, I read this book on content marketing. The problem with a lot of marketing books, even from big names like Guy Kawasaki, is that they focus too much on mechanics and not enough on theory. The problem with writing a book about the mechanics of an internet tool is that the internet is constantly changing, thus leaving the book in the dust by the time it finally hits shelves. Thankfully, Handley and her co-author, C. C. Chapman, deftly side-s In my quest to learn everything I can about social media, I read this book on content marketing. The problem with a lot of marketing books, even from big names like Guy Kawasaki, is that they focus too much on mechanics and not enough on theory. The problem with writing a book about the mechanics of an internet tool is that the internet is constantly changing, thus leaving the book in the dust by the time it finally hits shelves. Thankfully, Handley and her co-author, C. C. Chapman, deftly side-step this trap. "Content Rules" is indeed a theory book, and a good one at that. They outline essential first steps, best practices, and do's and don'ts that every savvy social media marketer needs to understand. At the end of the book is a boatload of case-studies that showcase the principles espoused throughout the book in action. The only thing I find lacking in this book is its tendency to rely too much on informality. One of the biggest rules in blogging to write informally, that is, like the way you speak. In book form, however, this gets tiresome after a while, especially when none of the author's attempts at levity are particularly funny. It might make you exude air through your nostrils when you read it on a computer screen, but on the printed page it's annoying. All told, Handley and Chapman are terrific writers who definitely know what they're doing. I'm glad to have read "Content Rules," it being sumptuous portion in my ongoing diet of social media books.

  15. 5 out of 5

    September Michaud

    I listened to the audio version of this during my commute. Having already done some PR work, none of this information was new to me but it was a good reintroduction to some things like SEO and the importance of being able to write for different markets. Because I now do marketing for a small library, I thought I would have to alter the information in this book (really aimed toward profit-seeking businesses) to fit my needs, but that wasn't the case--a couple of libraries were even referenced thro I listened to the audio version of this during my commute. Having already done some PR work, none of this information was new to me but it was a good reintroduction to some things like SEO and the importance of being able to write for different markets. Because I now do marketing for a small library, I thought I would have to alter the information in this book (really aimed toward profit-seeking businesses) to fit my needs, but that wasn't the case--a couple of libraries were even referenced throughout. This book is for anyone who is trying to gain an audience for their content creation. For libraries, it's about bringing in patrons, for businesses--customers, for amateur bloggers--just general readers, and this book really explains how to gain an audience by making content that is extremely useful and compelling. Ann Handley has really become a go-to author in the social media marketing world and with good reason. She explains key concepts in a simple, logical way that makes them seem easy. For this reason, I've also picked up a copy of her "Everybody Writes: Your Go-To Guide to Creating Ridiculously Good Content" and I am hoping it will give me a more in-depth look at various techniques for short informational writing with a strong voice.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Fitzgerald

    Many people complain that this book is too fraught with basics: I've run an online business for years and I found many tips and ideas that hadn't occurred to me. My ream of notes from the text numbered a 100+ entries. I definitely feel it was worth the investment. That's not to say it's perfect. The authors really do try to appeal to everyone, which includes many backward-thinking businesses. It puts them in this odd area where they are trying to sound casual but at the same time they can't risk Many people complain that this book is too fraught with basics: I've run an online business for years and I found many tips and ideas that hadn't occurred to me. My ream of notes from the text numbered a 100+ entries. I definitely feel it was worth the investment. That's not to say it's perfect. The authors really do try to appeal to everyone, which includes many backward-thinking businesses. It puts them in this odd area where they are trying to sound casual but at the same time they can't risk losing anybody, especially the fussier older owners. What's left is often too dry to appeal to some of the newer content managers they seek to pursue. The attempts at humor often fall flat. The book also has an overproduced feel to it, as if too many people had to approve each sentence. What's left repeatedly appeals to everyone and no one. There are sections you wish they went deeper into the topic. It would have benefited greatly from having a few interviews with experts. Some of the writing is repetitive. That said, they clearly do a considerable amount of work in the field, and they have quite a few notes from the front lines. There's some real gems in here. Anyone who works with the public online could benefit from this.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Taylor

    Online, people trust people they can talk to as another human being. Conversation is king. Content is how you start conversations. Content Rules is divided into three parts. The first covers the rules of producing content. Part two provides the hammer-and-nails practical section. The third part is a collection of success stories: businesses who use content as a core element of their online strategy. The section on rules asks you to consider who you want to attract with your content. Answering that Online, people trust people they can talk to as another human being. Conversation is king. Content is how you start conversations. Content Rules is divided into three parts. The first covers the rules of producing content. Part two provides the hammer-and-nails practical section. The third part is a collection of success stories: businesses who use content as a core element of their online strategy. The section on rules asks you to consider who you want to attract with your content. Answering that question helps you decide what content to create and how to best reach your audience. Vague targets lead to vague results. Producing content can be less time-consuming than you’re expecting. Once you have your audience in mind, create an editorial schedule – what you’ll publish, where and how often – and then stick to that calendar. Consistency is the key to content success. Because of this, while you can master multiple content platforms at once, you will want to choose a content production schedule you’re confident you can meet. The book itself is an example of great content and should inspire you. Entrepreneurs can use this book to learn how to publish engaging content to establish themselves as experts.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Missy Reid

    This is a helpful guide for general purposes with many examples of how a broad range of brands have applied the prescribed strategies in ways that make sense for them. The conclusion has a handy checklist that will be especially beneficial for inexperienced bloggers. I still have a few unanswered questions about best practices for developing a corporate blog plan that focuses on building trust agents and thought leadership. Considering that the connected consumer is cynical about corporate-spons This is a helpful guide for general purposes with many examples of how a broad range of brands have applied the prescribed strategies in ways that make sense for them. The conclusion has a handy checklist that will be especially beneficial for inexperienced bloggers. I still have a few unanswered questions about best practices for developing a corporate blog plan that focuses on building trust agents and thought leadership. Considering that the connected consumer is cynical about corporate-sponsored content, it seems that blogs might be more successful if valuable content is posted independent of the business, but with contact info and links that connect to the business. As a higher ed PR rep, I have many other questions that pertain directly to academic freedom, so it would've been great to read a case study that focuses on a small private. I didn't expect to find that in this book, as I know my particular concerns aren't shared by the masses. So I guess I need to retain the services of MarketingProfs, right? This book in itself is an excellent example of content marketing at its best.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stan Skrabut

    If you are writing for your business, non-profit, or personal site, you need to read Content Rules: How to Create Killer Blogs, Podcasts, Videos, Ebooks, Webinars (and More) That Engage Customers and Ignite Your Business*. If you are creating video content, writing a blog, posting on social media, or hosting a podcast, you need to read this book. I consider this a must reading for all the organizations and colleges I have been a part of. Ann Handley and C.C. Chapman have written ad easy to read If you are writing for your business, non-profit, or personal site, you need to read Content Rules: How to Create Killer Blogs, Podcasts, Videos, Ebooks, Webinars (and More) That Engage Customers and Ignite Your Business*. If you are creating video content, writing a blog, posting on social media, or hosting a podcast, you need to read this book. I consider this a must reading for all the organizations and colleges I have been a part of. Ann Handley and C.C. Chapman have written ad easy to read yet, tip rich book on writing content for your different platforms. Read more

  20. 4 out of 5

    Locs and Lenses

    This book answered all of my questions and eliminated all of my excuses. If you have a business, blog or web page that you want to get off of the ground then this is the book for you. I normally do not enjoy non-fiction but I was in desperate need of a boost and this delivered. I actually listened to the audio version of this book every day for about a week. I learned so much about the content of my blog and my other social media accounts that I know I will purchase this in a paperback. There are This book answered all of my questions and eliminated all of my excuses. If you have a business, blog or web page that you want to get off of the ground then this is the book for you. I normally do not enjoy non-fiction but I was in desperate need of a boost and this delivered. I actually listened to the audio version of this book every day for about a week. I learned so much about the content of my blog and my other social media accounts that I know I will purchase this in a paperback. There are just so many things to remember. I love the narrators as well. I always think it is awesome when the actual author(s) does the reading because you can hear the genuine enthusiasm in their voices. This is a perfect book for entrepreneurs, marketers and those new to the entire social media platform for their business.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mari Rydings

    I cut my teeth in the print publishing world and am now navigating the constantly-changing world of the Digital Age. From its practical, "put-into-play right now" ideas to its real world examples, this book offers a common sense approach to marketing. The conversational tone makes this an entertaining yet accessible read. My brain is swirling with ways to reimagine existing content (versus simply recycling it), generate new content that bursts with personality and create a sustainable marketing I cut my teeth in the print publishing world and am now navigating the constantly-changing world of the Digital Age. From its practical, "put-into-play right now" ideas to its real world examples, this book offers a common sense approach to marketing. The conversational tone makes this an entertaining yet accessible read. My brain is swirling with ways to reimagine existing content (versus simply recycling it), generate new content that bursts with personality and create a sustainable marketing strategy that incorporates many of the digital marketing tools now available. The chapter on B2B marketing is invaluable. I borrowed this book from the library, but will add it to my permanent collection.

  22. 5 out of 5

    James

    Some decent advice here on the importance of planning and repurposing communications materials, but it seems geared more for managers than content creators. The book does offer a good grounding on different communications vehicles and basic approaches to storytelling. But anyone doing this for their job will likely already be familiar with what they're sharing. The authors are a bit social media–utopian for my tastes, and they're also big on hype-y title and Buzzfeed-esque listicle strategies, w Some decent advice here on the importance of planning and repurposing communications materials, but it seems geared more for managers than content creators. The book does offer a good grounding on different communications vehicles and basic approaches to storytelling. But anyone doing this for their job will likely already be familiar with what they're sharing. The authors are a bit social media–utopian for my tastes, and they're also big on hype-y title and Buzzfeed-esque listicle strategies, which already feel more like empty promises than enticing content. Finally, while the writing style style is supposed to be cutesy and conversational, it felt more like filler copy wasting my time. (Guess I would have preferred a white paper, per their description.)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ali

    I would start my review by saying that this book is good. It's a good overview of a lot of content marketing concepts. Like with most things in life, the items in this book are more easily said (or written about, as is the case here), than done. Not saying that this book isn't helpful -- it really is! It's just that it's not going to do your work for you. However, what this book will do is give you the confidence to go forth and do the work yourself. Which is a definitely a good and helpful thing I would start my review by saying that this book is good. It's a good overview of a lot of content marketing concepts. Like with most things in life, the items in this book are more easily said (or written about, as is the case here), than done. Not saying that this book isn't helpful -- it really is! It's just that it's not going to do your work for you. However, what this book will do is give you the confidence to go forth and do the work yourself. Which is a definitely a good and helpful thing, in the end. I would 100% recommend this book to anyone who's interested in getting into content marketing and wants to learn more.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mark Polino

    This was good primer on social media for business. The beginning pieces on writing were especially helful. The book was less useful at the end when they moved into thinks like video and audio since this was more of a basic coverage and I was looking for something more advanced.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jon Kruse

    It shares some of the core themes to create good content. Speak human, play to your strengths, make it easy to share. It also gives examples of how businesses are succeeding and what you can take away from their triumphs.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Marcie Hill

    This book was good in that it introduced you to the different tools and best practices. It also gave examples of how companies were engaging their customers, which is always a plus. More importantly, it gave me ideas for my next book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    John Taylor

    Really well written book with various ideas I'd never thought of as well as some I thought I knew but learned new ways to look at them. Great book for anyone who writes a blog or is considering writing or owning a website.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    As someone already very familiar with content marketing, there was nothing earth shattering in the book, however there were some good reminders. If you're new to content marketing, the book includes practical, actionable advice.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Eliabeth Hawthorne

    I've gone through about 50 of those colored tabs marking important websites to look at, materials for our content style guide, and useful tips. Even though only one chapter is dedicated to B2B, this is probably the best business writing book I've ever read.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Britney

    This is a great first book to read about content marketing. It is conversationally written and not too high-level, covering broadly the "whats" and "whys" of all the tools out there without bogging you down with the "hows." Very glad I read this.

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