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Night Probe!

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Also see: Alternate Cover Editions for this ISBN [ACE] ACE #1 In the midst of an international crisis, Heidi Milligan, a beautiful, brilliant American naval commander, accidentally discovers an obscure reference to the long-buried North American Treaty, a precedent-shattering secret pact between the United States and Great Britain. The President believes that the tr Also see: Alternate Cover Editions for this ISBN [ACE] ACE #1 In the midst of an international crisis, Heidi Milligan, a beautiful, brilliant American naval commander, accidentally discovers an obscure reference to the long-buried North American Treaty, a precedent-shattering secret pact between the United States and Great Britain. The President believes that the treaty offers the single shot at salvation for an energy-starved, economically devastated nation, but the only two copies plummeted into the watery depths of the Atlantic in twin disasters long ago. The original document must be found—and the one American who can do the job is Dirk Pitt.   But in London, a daring counterplot is being orchestrated to see that the treaty is never implemented. Brian Shaw, a master spy who has often worked hand in hand with American agents, now confronts his most challenging command. Pitt’s mission: Raise the North American Treaty. Shaw’s mission: Stop Pitt.   Praise for Night Probe! and the Dirk Pitt® novels   “A rich tale . . . an absorbing, carefully told mystery with plenty of surprises.”—Los Angeles Times   “Dirk Pitt is a combination James Bond and Jacques Cousteau.”—New York Daily News


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Also see: Alternate Cover Editions for this ISBN [ACE] ACE #1 In the midst of an international crisis, Heidi Milligan, a beautiful, brilliant American naval commander, accidentally discovers an obscure reference to the long-buried North American Treaty, a precedent-shattering secret pact between the United States and Great Britain. The President believes that the tr Also see: Alternate Cover Editions for this ISBN [ACE] ACE #1 In the midst of an international crisis, Heidi Milligan, a beautiful, brilliant American naval commander, accidentally discovers an obscure reference to the long-buried North American Treaty, a precedent-shattering secret pact between the United States and Great Britain. The President believes that the treaty offers the single shot at salvation for an energy-starved, economically devastated nation, but the only two copies plummeted into the watery depths of the Atlantic in twin disasters long ago. The original document must be found—and the one American who can do the job is Dirk Pitt.   But in London, a daring counterplot is being orchestrated to see that the treaty is never implemented. Brian Shaw, a master spy who has often worked hand in hand with American agents, now confronts his most challenging command. Pitt’s mission: Raise the North American Treaty. Shaw’s mission: Stop Pitt.   Praise for Night Probe! and the Dirk Pitt® novels   “A rich tale . . . an absorbing, carefully told mystery with plenty of surprises.”—Los Angeles Times   “Dirk Pitt is a combination James Bond and Jacques Cousteau.”—New York Daily News

30 review for Night Probe!

  1. 5 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    So, I’m berating myself that I have only recently discovered the joys of reading Clive Cussler. Seriously, Clive, where have you been all my life? “Night Probe!” is the third Cussler novel I have ever read, and it’s the sixth to feature his beloved action hero, Dirk Pitt. It’s clear to me now why so many people love the Pitt series. Strange name aside, Dirk Pitt is a pretty lovable hero. Tough but funny, charismatic but serious when he needs to be, Pitt is basically an Amer So, I’m berating myself that I have only recently discovered the joys of reading Clive Cussler. Seriously, Clive, where have you been all my life? “Night Probe!” is the third Cussler novel I have ever read, and it’s the sixth to feature his beloved action hero, Dirk Pitt. It’s clear to me now why so many people love the Pitt series. Strange name aside, Dirk Pitt is a pretty lovable hero. Tough but funny, charismatic but serious when he needs to be, Pitt is basically an American James Bond minus a political agenda. His sole motivation is the thrill of the hunt and the adrenaline rush of adventure. Pitt was into extreme living long before anyone was into “extreme” anything. Cussler’s novels are ridiculously good fun. They are not meant to be anything more. Matthew McConaughey’s attempt to bring Pitt to the big screen in “Sahara” (which was the second attempt to adapt a Cussler novel to the big screen, the first being “Raise the Titanic!” in 1980, starring Richard Jordan as Pitt) captured some of the fun of the series but apparently didn’t bring the fan base (or the box office revenue) expected. I think part of the reason for the movie's lackluster success is that Cussler’s machine gun pacing and clever plotting didn't translate well. Not a prose stylist by any stretch of the imagination, Cussler nevertheless tells a damn good story. It’s perhaps no wonder, then, that other best-selling action/adventure authors like Tom Clancy have often cited Cussler as one of their inspirations as writers. Cussler is like Hemingway with a helluva lot more testosterone and minus the literary pretension. The plot of “Night Probe!” hinges on two tragedies that occurred in May 1914, one fictional and one real. The fictional tragedy was the passenger steam locomotive The Manhattan Limited that went over a bridge and plunged headlong into the Hudson River, killing everyone aboard. Pieces of the train washed ashore but the majority of the wreckage was never discovered. The real-life tragedy was the accidental sinking of the ocean liner RMS Empress of Ireland in the Saint Lawrence River. Of the 1,477 passengers on-board, only 465 survived. It is considered the largest maritime accident in Canadian history in terms of casualties. In a cosmic twist of fate, two copies of a significant document known as the North American Treaty were lost to history in these tragedies. Mysteriously, all traces and mention of the treaty were purposely erased from history at the behest of the parties involved, namely the British and American governments. Fast-forward to 1989, when an intrepid naval commander named Heidi Milligan, conducting research on something seemingly unrelated, uncovers mention of the treaty. Her sleuthing attracts the attention of the British government, who activates a retired spy named Brian Shaw to stop her from discovering more. Unfortunately for Shaw, Milligan shares her information with Dirk Pitt, who is as intrepid if not moreso. Amidst this ensuing cat-and-mouse, international relations between the U.S. and Canada are becoming strained, to say the least. When Quebec freedom fighters unsuccessfully attempt to assassinate Quebec’s Prime Minister, it opens the door for a national secessionist movement in the Canadian government’s parliament. The U.S. will be hit hard by a potential secession of Quebec from Canada, due to a new discovery of underwater oil wells within Quebec waters. The U.S. is already facing a major oil shortage and skyrocketing oil prices, so Quebec’s secession could result in an economic disaster. When the President of the United States discovers that the North American Treaty was, essentially, a bill of sale negotiated between President Woodrow Wilson and King George of England to sell Canada in its entirety to the U.S. for one billion dollars of 1914 money, Pitt and his team at the National Underwater and Marine Agency (NUMA) are immediately called in to retrieve the North American Treaty from one or both wrecks, if possible. Hot on Pitt’s trail, of course, is Shaw and a psychotic Canadian mountie improbably and sadly named Floss Gly. The clock is ticking... As ridiculous as the plot sounds, Cussler makes it seem believable. Of course, anyone who actually lived through 1989 would notice the glaring historical inaccuracies. One must keep in mind that Cussler published the book in 1981, so the events in the novel were set nine years in Cussler’s future. If you’re good at suspending some of your disbelief and enjoy an exciting action/adventure now and then, pick up an early Cussler novel if you’ve never done so. You may be pleasantly surprised.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Debra Johnson

    Night Probe! by Clive Cussler Genres; Action/Adventure, Crime, Mystery, Suspense 4 Stars Published April 1st 1982 by Bantam Book I admit it. I oftentimes buy my books at flea markets and yard sells. What is awesome is when the wife is dumping her husbands book collection. Talk about a gold mine for an avid addicted reader and a lover of suspense, action and 'secret agent' types. This particular yard sell endeavor yielded me a BOX FULL of paperback and (got to love it) Hardb Night Probe! by Clive Cussler Genres; Action/Adventure, Crime, Mystery, Suspense 4 Stars Published April 1st 1982 by Bantam Book I admit it. I oftentimes buy my books at flea markets and yard sells. What is awesome is when the wife is dumping her husbands book collection. Talk about a gold mine for an avid addicted reader and a lover of suspense, action and 'secret agent' types. This particular yard sell endeavor yielded me a BOX FULL of paperback and (got to love it) Hardback! copies of Clive Cussler books and other gems. Another big plus, in the very near future I was to meet my present husband, and when he saw my collection of these books, it was 'Insta-Love'. I sometimes wonder if he just wanted me for my books. Lmbo. This one was full of action and suspense. Mystery & Intrigue. A super fun read. I Loved it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Glen

    In the days of WWI, Britain is desperate, and signs a mysterious treaty with the USA. The ship carrying the treaty across the Atlantic. Years later, a reference to the mysterious treaty is found. Britain starts killing off anyone who might know about it. Dirk Pitt gets involved, as a treaty may be in a sunken ship. Plenty of spy jinks and high adventure. I had a problem with the ending where a Naval officer is rewarded for telling secrets, which got people killed. Sure they In the days of WWI, Britain is desperate, and signs a mysterious treaty with the USA. The ship carrying the treaty across the Atlantic. Years later, a reference to the mysterious treaty is found. Britain starts killing off anyone who might know about it. Dirk Pitt gets involved, as a treaty may be in a sunken ship. Plenty of spy jinks and high adventure. I had a problem with the ending where a Naval officer is rewarded for telling secrets, which got people killed. Sure they were fictional characters, but still.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Neil

    Despite being a bit dated in parts, this is still a fun book to read. It moves at a pretty good pace from start to finish; it still holds my interest throughout the entire story. (view spoiler)[I liked the author's referencing James Bond throughout the book (including having his name changed to 'Brian Shaw' and referencing the 'one time' when he was actually married but his wife died shortly thereafter). (hide spoiler)] It takes place shortly after Vixen 03 and utili Despite being a bit dated in parts, this is still a fun book to read. It moves at a pretty good pace from start to finish; it still holds my interest throughout the entire story. (view spoiler)[I liked the author's referencing James Bond throughout the book (including having his name changed to 'Brian Shaw' and referencing the 'one time' when he was actually married but his wife died shortly thereafter). (hide spoiler)] It takes place shortly after Vixen 03 and utilizes a character or two who were introduced in the prior novel (including Heidi Milligan). The author does a nice job of weaving historical fiction in with historical fact to tell a crazy, rousing story (view spoiler)[whose core is that there exists a copy of a treaty called the North American Treaty that united the United States and Canada into one nation (hide spoiler)] . The character development is decent. Al Giordino has some 'cameos' towards the end the story; I may have to read Deep Six next to see if I can figure out when Al becomes a recurring character and Dirk's "sidekick" in future novels. So, considering how much of a 'foil' he becomes in later novels so that Dirk's "genius" can be revealed, it is always 'fun/nice' to see him when he was 'more in his prime' and had some relative depth to his character when he showed up in a story. I am not sure how much Heidi develops as a character; she seems to play more of a 'second fiddle' to keep the story moving (view spoiler)[as she "habitually" inadvertently passes information to the British via her liaisons with Brian Shaw despite his regularly betraying her trust and confidence (hide spoiler)] . (view spoiler)[Her lack of judgment does kinda call into question her being a commander in the US Navy and if she can continue to be trusted in a command position or any future 'secret' information. (hide spoiler)] Rudi Gunn also makes an appearance, but his performance does not stand out to me. Foss Gly was nuts! (view spoiler)[Through experience gained over years of crime, he had become a master assassin of sorts and was utilized to try and driver the separation of Quebec from the rest of Canada as well as the Americans attempt to retrieve a copy of the missing treaty. He was also a master of disguise, which allowed him to successfully mimic Henry Villon (an important government official and co-conspirator/lover of Danielle Sarveux) to the point of fooling people who know Henry well (including Villon’s wife and Danielle). He is able to 'blackmail' his way out of Canada but fails to realize his death has already been prepared for by Charles Sarveux, the Prime Minister of Canada. What is kinda 'cool' is that Foss Gly shows up in Cyclops and Pitt gets to face off against this monster-0f-a-man. His mimicking Villon does lead to some amusing moments in the book, as he seduces Danielle without her realizing he is an imposter; she later comments to Henry how different he felt inside of her "the other night" and he does not give it a second thought. (hide spoiler)] One of the 'current' weaknesses of the book when read ‘today’ is its portrayal of women. There are three 'primary' women mentioned in the novel (Heidi Milligan, Danielle Sarveux, and Dirk Pitt's secretary, Zerri Pochinski). Each of them has a ‘role’ to play in the story, and the roles are ‘prominent’ roles, but they still play ‘second fiddle’ to the men. (view spoiler)[I do not know how 'strong' these women are supposed to be, but they are quite prone to 'feminine weaknesses' throughout the novel. Well, Heidi and Danielle are. Dirk's secretary is described as being quite beautiful and willing to have a 'working affair' with her boss, but Dirk has refused to engage her due to being burned in a prior working relationship. Both of them are described as pondering how such a relationship might proceed at different points in the book. Heidi has a 'one-time' fling with Dirk; however, she engages in multiple sexual encounters with Brian (as part of his assignment is to seduce her to learn what she knows, British Intelligence being aware of her fondness for older men and her prior relationship with the Admiral Walter Bass from Vixen 03). At the same time, Heidi is portrayed as being fairly smart and an important part of the story. She does find the initial blurbs that describe the North American Treaty, which leads to the rest of the book taking place. She is also instrumental in overcoming some obstacles thrown in the way of the Americans in terms of trying to locate various bits of information. Because of her relationship with Brian Shaw, she regularly puts the Americans behind the proverbial eight ball as the British race ahead, but then she makes up for her errors in judgment by coming up with alternative means to find the desired information stolen by Shaw. So it is interesting to read a novel in which Dirk does not come up with all of the information before he proceeds to razzle-dazzle everybody with his knowledge, foresight, and ability to find the desired information without anyone else’s assistance. The author did do a nice job with Heidi in terms of having her find information needed to help solve the mystery and find the lone surviving copy of the North American Treaty. In the end, though, she and Brian Shaw fly off together after professing their deep and abiding love for each other. The descriptions of how different Pitt and Shaw are when described as lovers is amusing. Her one-and-only round of sex with Pitt is described as “just when the blood felt as though it would burst inside and her muscles pulsed uncontrollably, she opened her mouth to scream. It was then Pitt penetrated her and she came and came in a sweeping rage of pleasure that never seemed to end” (46). Whoa! What a hunka-chunka-rough-lovin’ man she has, there! After her first encounter with Shaw, she ponders how “making love to a stranger only a few hours after meeting him gave her an inner thrill she had not known before. It was a sensation that was peculiar to her” (123) (apparently because she’d only had five sexual partners by the time she was thirty). She goes on to ponder, “Why is it . . . the older a woman becomes, the more she regrets not having gone to bed with more men” (123). Of course, Shaw, being the gentleman he is, takes her back to bed and ravishes her after she willingly gives him the information he is seeking in regards to the lost Treaty (125). When she is in the throes of lovemaking with Shaw later in the book, she begins to compare Pitt and Shaw, describing how “Pitt’s style was consuming and savage and impelled to respond with savage intensity. Their time in bed had been a competition, a tournament she never won” (292). It’s funny how “her mind refused to accept his superiority, and yet her body hungered for it with sinful abandon” (293). In contrast, Shaw was described as “tender and almost respectful, and she could control her responses. Together, they nurtured each other” (293). At least she recognizes both men are using her; she just enjoys how Shaw goes about using her more than she enjoys Pitt’s aggressiveness. By the story’s end, Heidi “felt a deep sense of longing as she remembered how Shaw touched her. He had invaded her life and she was resentful now of the love he had taken. But there was no remorse, only annoyance with herself for losing control” (341). It’s kinda funny how she feels no remorse over giving Shaw information that led to the deaths of various individuals because she could not keep her mouth shut and was too trusting, but she feels remorse over losing control of herself around Shaw. Ah, well. Ain’t love grand? Danielle seems to serve no other purpose, really, other than being a sex object for either Henry or Foss to copulate with. She is described as being rich, wealthy, and intelligent (although it never really shows in the book), and well-connected. Well, she is ‘verbally’ described in this manner; what the author shows about her is the opposite of what she is supposed to be. She comes across as shallow, catty, weak, simple-minded, and ruled/governed by her lusts and emotions. At the end of the book, she ‘realizes’ that she no longer has a future with Henry Villon as he is going to cast her aside once he becomes the President of Quebec, yet she can no longer ‘go home’ as she has already declared her plans to divorce her husband and Henry has also ensured their marriage will no longer last (as Henry has already told Charles about his affair with Charles’ wife). It is somewhat odd that Henry Villon is mentioned as having a wife, and she is mentioned in pasting a time or two, but she never really makes an appearance in the book at all. The poor woman is the victim of her husband’s cheating, yet she apparently never learns or knows what he is doing or who he is doing it with (or, I suppose, the case could be made she knows and does not care because she has her own lover(s) as well). In any case, Henry does treat his wife poorly by betraying her with his lecherous behavior with Danielle. It also seems odd that Danielle is so willing to acquiesce to Henry’s abandoning her and casting her aside; one would think the altruism of “hell hath no fury like a woman scorned” should have held true, here, and Danielle would have had her vengeance upon Henry. Her willingly accepting Henry’s abandoning her and casting her aside really seemed out of character for her, to be honest. (hide spoiler)] (view spoiler)[I never quite understood the whole ‘scene’ where Danielle and Henry are being buried alive and Charles is watching as his wife begs and pleads for forgiveness and a second chance (301 – 308). It was a really weird moment in the book. I mean, a part of me kinda ‘gets it’ (in terms of a husband seeking revenge against his wife and her lover for how they have both wronged him), and I am sure it also had to do with his plans in conjunction with the United States President to make Canada and the United States one nation. But, it was still a ‘weird’ moment in the book, especially of how Danielle “finally” accepted her fate and mouthed “forgive me” right before the last bit of the car was buried from view (but before it was completely buried in the construction trench). (hide spoiler)] In many respects, it was a fun book. It does beggar the imagination a bit in places, but that is what makes the book so much fun to read. The amount of sex in the book is pretty crazy, too; I cannot figure out if the author was trying to pay too much of an homage to James Bond or not (considering James appears in the story as Pitt’s ‘primary’ antagonist) with the amount of sex. The author does a good job, at times, of giving his secondary characters “strong humanity” and some depth, then, in other places, they are just a part of the background. I really enjoyed the “haunted train” that was introduced early on in the book and the source of its mystery was eventually discovered. It was assuredly one of the ‘more enjoyable’ moments of the book. (view spoiler)[I also liked how Pitt was wearing a type of costume and posing as a corpse when Shaw entered the railway car where Pitt found the Treaty. It was a rather amusing scene, as Shaw nearly had a heart attack before realizing what he thought was a corpse was actually Pitt in disguise. One would have thought that Shaw should have noticed a puddle of water or something, even wet footprints, when he entered the final railway car; the standing water or trail of water (whatever the case might be) should have alerted him to Pitt’s presence and the fact that Pitt (or, some American agent, anyway) was alive and well in the cavern with him. In any case, it made me laugh when I read Shaw’s reaction to Pitt’s slowly sitting up and turning to face him. (hide spoiler)] I think one of the ‘most interesting’ facets of this book is that Dirk Pitt still plays something of a ‘second fiddle’ in his own story. While he is the ‘primary’ hero, he is surrounded by other capable people who assist him in ‘getting the job done’ and discovering the necessary information to solve the mystery before him (and his team). Whereas in later novels, he would be able to find or deduce most of the information on his own, in this novel Heidi plays a big part in helping him locate the surviving copy of the Treaty, which is pretty cool in its own right. While Al has a smaller part to play in this novel, he still has an important role as leader of one of the search teams (and the descriptions of his ‘leadership’ in times of stress were pretty funny to read). I do not remember if Hiram Yaeger was in the novel, but Rudi Gunn was, working with Pitt at the site of the Empress if Ireland to locate the British copy of the Treaty. The technology in the book is somewhat advanced, considering when it was written and the advances the author was hypothesizing would happen. (view spoiler)[The whole concept of Canada having a stranglehold on the United States of America in terms of the supply and demand of energy was pretty crazy and thought-provoking. A specific hydroelectric dam provided power to over fifteen US states, and the power was cut off for something like fifteen minutes, max, to prove a point to the American superpower – that would have been crazy to have experienced! Here, this ‘little country’ to the North was capable of holding a super power hostage! It was a nice idea for the book. (hide spoiler)] In an attempt to wrap this up, I still remember the first time I read this book and how crazy I thought it was and how much I enjoyed it. That was over twenty years ago. I still enjoy reading this book, how crazy it is, and how fast-paced it is. While it does not have some of the subsequent “signatures” one usually finds in a Pitt novel, it definitely has a creativity and uniqueness all its own that helps set it apart from the subsequent novels after, maybe, Treasure, that all seem to follow a similar ‘formula’ when it comes to telling a Dirk Pitt story. Be that as it may, I am sure I will reread it again at some point in time in the relative near future, as I still enjoyed reading it (again) that much.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Roberta

    In May 1914 two couriers disappear in twin disasters taking the only two copies of the North American Treaty with them. The governments of the United States and Great Britain order a cover up so it is as if the treaty never existed. In February 1989 Heidi Milligan, a stunningly beautiful (of course) naval commander discovers an obscure reference to the long-lost document which is now worth billions of dollars. The race is on to rescue one copy of the treaty from the bottom of the ocean. I have a In May 1914 two couriers disappear in twin disasters taking the only two copies of the North American Treaty with them. The governments of the United States and Great Britain order a cover up so it is as if the treaty never existed. In February 1989 Heidi Milligan, a stunningly beautiful (of course) naval commander discovers an obscure reference to the long-lost document which is now worth billions of dollars. The race is on to rescue one copy of the treaty from the bottom of the ocean. I have a soft spot for Dirk Pitt even though these books can get really over the top sometimes. This book is my favorite of the series because part of it is set in the village where I was living at the time. The physical description of landmarks and buildings in the area was so detailed and so correct that I was convinced that a few of the other historical details were based on fact. When I tried to hunt down the story at the local public library the story looked so plausible that the local history librarian was puzzled that she hadn't come across it before. We wrote to Clive Cussler and he replied "Don't believe everything you read" saying that he had made up every single bit of historical background in the book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kallen Kentner

    I've read all of the Dirk Pitt books (except perhaps some of the newest ones) and this definitely ranks as one of my favorites. In my opinion, Night Probe (pub. 1981) is the best of Dirk Pitt's earlier novel and byy earlier, I mean before books set before Treasure... for no particular reason except I feel that by Treasure, the tone and style of the novels has shifted more to his contemporary style. I re-read Night Probe! because of my love of the deep water recovery scenes I've read all of the Dirk Pitt books (except perhaps some of the newest ones) and this definitely ranks as one of my favorites. In my opinion, Night Probe (pub. 1981) is the best of Dirk Pitt's earlier novel and byy earlier, I mean before books set before Treasure... for no particular reason except I feel that by Treasure, the tone and style of the novels has shifted more to his contemporary style. I re-read Night Probe! because of my love of the deep water recovery scenes and the exciting locomotive storyline. The reason behind these two storylines is a fantastic plot, and by fantastic, I mean hard to believe. However, its an adventure. I rate it 5 stars not because this is great literature. This is great entertainment. It is definitely one of the best Dirk Pitt novels out there. The only reason I started reading Dirk Pitt was because my Dad has been a fan of the Clive Cussler series since the publication of "Raise the Titanic!" These are comfortable, entertaining and exciting reads.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    Dirk does it again, folks. The superhuman stamina and luck Cussler gives this guy always overwhelms me. I would never have accused either of them of having romantic tendencies, but the wonderful ending of Night Probe! (why does he end every title with an exclamation point?) proved me wrong. This is the best novel in the series so far.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Months before World War I consumed Europe and brought Britain’s Empire to the fields of France, a historic treaty could have changed everything if not for two accidents. The sixth book of Clive Cussler’s Dirk Pitt series, Night Probe!, finds the series protagonist on a historical and internationally significant hunt for a Treaty that sold Canada to the United States even as the aforementioned nation is on the verge of splitting and the United Kingdom is sending it’s great secret agent to stop him. Months before World War I consumed Europe and brought Britain’s Empire to the fields of France, a historic treaty could have changed everything if not for two accidents. The sixth book of Clive Cussler’s Dirk Pitt series, Night Probe!, finds the series protagonist on a historical and internationally significant hunt for a Treaty that sold Canada to the United States even as the aforementioned nation is on the verge of splitting and the United Kingdom is sending it’s great secret agent to stop him. On the same day, a railroad disaster along the Hudson River and a ship sinking in the St. Lawrence kills two diplomats from the United States and Great Britain heading from Canada to their respective capitals with signed treaties that sells Canada to the United States. After both men die and the treaties presumed lost, President Wilson communicates with his British counterpart to forget that it ever happened. Three-quarters of a century later, Heidi Mulligan finds a unknown letter by Wilson communicating to Prime Minister Asquith about the North American Treaty setting off a chain of events that discovers evidence about the unknown treaty and makes it’s way across the Pond to the British archives sending 10 Downing Street into a panic and getting out of retirement it’s greatest secret agent, Brian Shaw (not at all James Bond, but is basically an older James Bond). One of those Heidi tells is friend (from Vixen 03) Dirk Pitt who doing his own research on top of Heidi’s gives his circumstantial evidence to the new President, who was previously in the Senate with his father. The President uses the information as part of his plan with the embattled Canadian Prime Minister threatened with Quebec secession while recovering from an assassination attempt by a Quebec terrorist group headed by his own right-hand man in his cabinet, who is also having an affair with his wife. Shaw seduces Heidi to learn everything she does and then attempts to prevent Pitt from getting either copy of the treaty but comes just short. Pitt gets the Treaty to the President, who is speaking to the Canadian Parliament and announces the historical find while inviting the provinces to apply for statehood. Before anything else, the biggest issue with this book is Cussler’s total lack of understanding of the Constitution, Canadian history, and the Commonwealth of Nations. Of the three it’s the Constitution as all treaties must be approved by the Senate, which a President that had been a sitting Senator would know as well as Pitt’s father who is still a Senator, and after 75 years attempting to bring it to a vote would probably result in a Supreme Court case. The second is the Commonwealth of Nations are all self-governing and not the British Empire under a new name, so while it would have been embarrassing to Britain it wouldn’t result in what happened in the book. Now let’s get to the story; overall, it’s a good overall adventure tale with a good spy subplot and some good political intrigue (Canadian) and not so good (President). Pitt was able to get more nuisance and Heidi Mulligan was the best female character in the series so far, Brian Shaw as the older not-James Bond but basically is was a nice touch and good way to segue into so many plots. The Canadian political intrigue, if fleshed out more, could have been its own book but just added to the overall quality and somewhat makes up for the lack of understanding of various things on Cussler’s part. Night Probe! is a very good installment of the Dirk Pitt series that is unfortunately undermined by Clive Cussler’s intentional or unintentional lack of understanding over various political and historical factors. The various adventure, spy, and political intrigue subplots work well together to create fun book to read if you don’t think too much.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Neil

    This is a book that brings me both enjoyment and frustration. It is a fast book [not as fast as Vixen 3, but still fast] and it still manages to be interesting. It also has James Bond appearing opposite Dirk Pitt. Ironically, this is my third or fourth copy of the hardbound edition. I bought my first copy at a thrift store, loaned it out, and never got it back. Same with the second copy. The third copy I bought at a used book store, only to have it magically disappear from my shelves [either I l This is a book that brings me both enjoyment and frustration. It is a fast book [not as fast as Vixen 3, but still fast] and it still manages to be interesting. It also has James Bond appearing opposite Dirk Pitt. Ironically, this is my third or fourth copy of the hardbound edition. I bought my first copy at a thrift store, loaned it out, and never got it back. Same with the second copy. The third copy I bought at a used book store, only to have it magically disappear from my shelves [either I loaned it a THIRD time or somebody borrowed it and forgot to return it]. This book frustrates the heck out of me in the sense that it introduces a document that will literally change the geopolitical landscape of the planet as well as previously undiscovered wealth on the ocean floor that will help bring the United States out of bankruptcy/debt. Yet, after this novel, we never again hear of the treaty that combined the countries of Canada and the United States into one country. The entire premise is a fascinating one, and I enjoyed how the author went about ensuring the treaty was lost and then found nearly eighty years later. The author does a masterful job of blending fact with fiction to tell a compelling story. This is one of the 'off-again' novels for Dirk and Loren. Loren does not even rate an afterthought in Dirk's mind in this book. He is gung-ho for Heidi Milligan in this novel - he encounters her in passing at a restaurant and she convinces him to bed her for the night. She is still in mourning [of a sort] over the passing of her former lover, the retired Admiral Bass, and is trying to move on. Dirk is more than happy to help her. In fact, I think this novel might have the highest concentration of sexual activity in it for a Dirk Pitt novel [not that that is necessarily anything to brag about]. Dirk shacks up with Heidi, who then shacks up a few times with the suave and debonair Brian Shaw [aka James Bond]. Meanwhile, not to be outdone, the Canadian President's wife is having an affair with his Minister of Internal Affairs [nice play on words, get it?] and has been for quite some time. Unbeknownst to her [until it is too late] an assassin of her lover [Foss Gly, who returns in Cyclops] also seduces her in an attempt to drive a wedge between her and her lover. So, yeah, there is a lot of sex in this book. Crazy. (view spoiler)[ One of the 'funnier' moments is when Danielle is speaking with Gly, thinking he is Villon, and commenting upon how different he felt inside her 'this time.' Gly tenses for a moment, thinking she might have figured out he is not the man whom she thinks he is, but instead she talks about how much she enjoyed his being crueler this time around. It is a humorously weird conversation in the book. (hide spoiler)] (view spoiler)[ We discover in this novel that the British sold Canada to the United States for the sum of one billion dollars, but the treaties were lost due to horrible accidents. Because all records were lost [or assumed to be lost, as the Brits never throw anything away], it was agreed the initial down payment would be turned into a loan. The 'current' President decides to total up the value of all monies given to Britain and never paid back by the Brits as justification for claiming the Brits received the agreed upon monetary value once the initial bones of the treaty are found. Heidi was researching Woodrow Wilson when she discovered references to a previously-unknown treaty. Her inquiries become the spark to light the fire of the story as two allies nearly become enemies over this treaty. The Canadian president narrowly survives an assassination attempt by Foss Gly, who attempts to shoot down his airliner. Faking delirium, her husband sets a trap for her by telling her to put more guards on their giant hydroelectric dam that provides energy to one-fourth of the United States. Villon uses this information to attempt to blackmail the United States by shutting off all power to the US for five seconds. The Brits get wind of the treaty and send in their top [retired] agent to get the goods from Heidi by seducing her. They know she has a thing for older men. We first see Shaw at a funeral for his old boss - one can only assume it is 'M' who has passed away and the former "Moneypenny" is speaking with him at the funeral. He does seduce Heidi and finds out everything she knows about the treaty. She never stops to consider that he might be pumping her for information. Dirk is nearly killed in an experimental submersible while testing the odd craft along the northern Canadian shoreline by a USN nuclear attack sub. When he reports to Admiral Sandecker about their underwater findings, Sandecker is amazed at how well their vessel has worked. It discovers minerals and precious resources via the unique wavelength at which each object/substance vibrates. This allows NUMA to find a vast oil field in a stratigraphic trap; the downside is that the oil field is located inside Quebec-waters. Dirk is ordered to dive on the Empress if Ireland as well as to find the Manhattan Limited in order to locate a copy of the lost treaty. He ends up saving Brian Shaw's life while searching the Empress of Ireland. Gly is ready to kill the British agent when Pitt intervenes. Gly ends up detonating explosives smuggled onto the Empress to destroy everybody's plans and to kill as many people as possible; his ploy fails. Despite his best efforts, the treaty has been ruined by the water over the course of time. Now Pitt has to find the Manhattan Limited. One would think after having been burnt by Shaw Heidi would be on her guard around this guy, but he seduces her a second time and AGAIN gets top-secret information out of her through the seduction. You'd think the girl would have learned the first time! They figure out that the train is probably buried in a mine somewhere. A team of HMS Royal Marines parachutes into upper state New York; they end up facing off against three companies [about forty men] from the USMC. Dirk Pitt ends up doing a 'night probe' [the term used by divers swimming in dark underwater caves/caverns at night] in order to reach the Manhattan Limited before the Brits do. Obviously, he succeeds. Shaw is wounded. But in an interesting turn of events, Shaw is released by Pitt at the end of the story so that Shaw can take Heidi back to Britain and they can live happily ever after. This is one of the few times where Dirk does not get the girl [or have the girl in his arms] at the end of the book. (hide spoiler)] One of my favorite moments in the book was when the Canadian destroyer tells an unidentified floating object to move it or lose it - if the vessel does not move the Canadians will attack. The unidentified floating vessel signals back that they are a guided missile cruiser and will be more than happy to blow the Canadians out of the water [my paraphrase]. I laughed quite a bit when reading that segment the first couple of times, and it still brings a smile to my face. In the end, Foss Gly appears to die [I say 'appears' because he survives to show up in Cuba in Cyclops]. Danielle and Villon die. Oddly enough, Shaw does not die. And we find out (view spoiler)[ the American president and the Canadian president have been planning for the day to come when the United States and the Canadian Provinces will become one country (hide spoiler)] . The whole treaty where Canada and the US become one country is a great idea. Especially when one considers the amount of mineral wealth and resources that have been discovered in Canadian waters [territories]. Yet nothing is ever said again of Canada and the US becoming one country in future stories. It should have been mentioned several times, in my opinion, in future books. It was kind of a let down, especially after how the author has carried some sub-plots over from one book to the next. For instance, the 'doodlebug' was built specifically due to the actions of Meta Section, which was the think tank started by the former president discussed in Raise the Titanic. Ah, well. It does not detract from my overall enjoyment of the book. I loved how James Bond shows up in the book and is Dirk Pitt's opponent. It is more than fitting, and it makes the book that much more delightful. I thought it was a nice homage to the British super spy, and the author did splendid job by utilizing the character like he did. It was pretty funny in parts, in my opinion. Definitely made the book worth the reading.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mark Harrison

    Excellent adventure tale as Pitt tries to salvage a missing train and a passenger liner to find a treaty ceding Canada to the USA. British agents battle against him and there are lots of good action sequences. All in all a good engaging thriller.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Eric Bauman

    You know that one favorite restaurant of yours? Sure you do: the one that you go into so often that they know you on sight, and where you order pretty much the same thing every time so that you almost don’t have to order—they just bring it to you. And it is always so good! You know the place? For me, Clive Cussler’s Dirk Pitt series is like that restaurant (except that Clive Cussler doesn’t know me—at least, I don’t think he does). I have read all but the last two Pitt books—and am re You know that one favorite restaurant of yours? Sure you do: the one that you go into so often that they know you on sight, and where you order pretty much the same thing every time so that you almost don’t have to order—they just bring it to you. And it is always so good! You know the place? For me, Clive Cussler’s Dirk Pitt series is like that restaurant (except that Clive Cussler doesn’t know me—at least, I don’t think he does). I have read all but the last two Pitt books—and am rereading them now—so while the details aren’t remembered, I at least know what I’m going to get: a fast read, a great adventure with beautiful women and fast cars, extremely unlikely escapes, coincidences that strain credibility, but I get to the end exhilarated and having enjoyed myself. This time, the story starts in 1914, before World War I begins. An English envoy is carrying an important paper back to Britain when the ship he’s on collides with a coal ship and sinks in the St. Lawrence River. Meanwhile, an American envoy with another important piece of paper is on the Manhattan Limited, a train headed back down the Hudson towards Washington during a storm when a bridge spanning the river collapses and the train disappears. In future times (for the book anyway—1989), the United States is having a financial crisis and the President is considering defaulting on all of the nation’s debts. Meanwhile, Quebec is making noises like it wants to separate from the rest of Canada. The pieces of paper that the men 75 years previously come to life, and Pitt now finds himself in charge to salvage operations to find those papers, which could have a monumental effect of history. That’s all I’ll say. Read the book and enjoy the discoveries in one of Pitt’s best books.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Bev Taylor

    an early dirk pitt but giordino does put in an appearance (small!) 1914 - 2 top diplomats hurrying home by sea and rail each carrying a document of world changing importance - a north american treaty. however, both the train and the ship are sunk and they die, together with their documents fast forward 3/4 of a century and with energy a top priority these documents could make a huge difference. enemies and allies alike fight to find them first and in the process many people - good and bad - die. an early dirk pitt but giordino does put in an appearance (small!) 1914 - 2 top diplomats hurrying home by sea and rail each carrying a document of world changing importance - a north american treaty. however, both the train and the ship are sunk and they die, together with their documents fast forward 3/4 of a century and with energy a top priority these documents could make a huge difference. enemies and allies alike fight to find them first and in the process many people - good and bad - die. was surprised that they mentioned the lifting of cuban sanctions in 1984 when the copyright for the book was 1981 also i could not see how heidi could love and return to shaw when surely trust was lost? bev

  13. 4 out of 5

    Fredrick Danysh

    In 1914 the United States, Canada, and Britain sign a secret treaty selling Canada to the United States. When two couriers carrying copies of the treaty disappear a cover up takes place. Decades later when world energy supplies dwindle, the American president renews efforts to find and enforce the treaty despite the efforts of both the British and a radical French-Canadian group.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    This is a superb example of Cussler's oeuvre. It has action, great scenes, suspense and even a homage to James Bond. Although Raise the Titanic broke Cussler into superstardom, this book was, to this reader, his best. Nowadays with his co-written books on the best seller list monthly, its a good idea to go back and read the books that got him there.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lee

    This Dirk Pitt adventure was a dangerous one for our hero. With a high body count, corrupt politician's (imagine that?), and a retired British spy called back in to service. This had the feel of a spy novel, with the action of a Pitt novel. Fun read.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Isaac Langley

    It had a lot of action. I thought that it was very good. Clive Cussler does a very good job at writing the Dirk Pitt collection. In this book Dirk has to find a treaty that has been buried in the sea for a long time, but the British don't want him to.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Scicluna

    James Bond meets Dirk Pitt. No seriously there is James bond in this novel by Clive Cussler.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Roopkumar Balachandran

    Heidi Milligan discovers of an old crumpled letter in a university archive which leads into obscure and long lost document of North American Treaty. In early 1914 the British were aware that war with Germany was just around the corner. Britain was scraping the bottom of its treasury when it entered World War I. The Prime Minister Herbert Asquith and King George V out of desperation approaches President Woodrow Wilson with a proposal of selling Canada to the US for 1 billion dollars. Richard Esse Heidi Milligan discovers of an old crumpled letter in a university archive which leads into obscure and long lost document of North American Treaty. In early 1914 the British were aware that war with Germany was just around the corner. Britain was scraping the bottom of its treasury when it entered World War I. The Prime Minister Herbert Asquith and King George V out of desperation approaches President Woodrow Wilson with a proposal of selling Canada to the US for 1 billion dollars. Richard Essex, Under Secretary of State under William Jennings Bryan and Harvey Shields, Deputy Secretary of the British Foreign Office drafted the North American Treaty. United States loaned 150 million dollars for war effort which was a down payment. Before the Treaty comes into force the two copies of the document were lost to time, after Harvey Shields traveling in Empress of Ireland collided with a coal collier sinks and subsequently another copy of the document with Richard Essex, traveling in Manhattan Limited train falls from the Deauville-Hudson bridge killing everyone. Heidi has a crush with old man Brain Shaw who is actually a spy serving on her Majestic secret service. Without knowing the consequences Heidi tells him about North American Treaty and as well as with our hero Dirk Pitt. The President of the United States facing a power crisis gets to know about the treaty through Dirk Pitt. He orders Pitt to salvage Empress of Ireland and Manhattan Limited. NUMA team starts their work. Same time in Canada, Prime Minister Charles Sarveux is facing internal problem through Free Quebec Society, a radical movement dedicated to independence of French Quebec, headed by its veiled head and Minister of Internal Affairs, Henri Villon. The assassination attempt over Charles flight fails. A paid assassin look alike of Henri Villon, Inspector Foss Gly creates havoc by killing Quebec Premier Jules Guerrier. The British sends Brain Shaw to get hold the North American Treaty before NUMA. Did Dirk Pitt succeeded in finding the document from Empress of Ireland and Manhattan Limited? What happened to Charles Sarveux, his cheating wife Danielle, Henri Villon and Brain Shaw? The mystery and suspense is revealed in the subsequent chapters by Ace story teller Clive Cussler. A fabulous story entwined with greater suspense. I thoroughly enjoyed the novel. In every story Dirk Pitt encounters his evil adversary. But this adversary is a patriotic spy, Brain Shaw. Both respect each other, to me Brain Shaw resembled aged James Bond having same characteristics charm and seduction. In the final pages Pitt mentions to Brain, that James Bond will be proud of Shaw and they were quite close. Like other novel I noticed some one liners of Pitt which I want to quote: Dirk Pitt conversing about North American Treaty with the President of United States, before they part the President asks Pitt. And you, Mr.Pitt, would you agree? Pitt closed his briefcase and stood up. I'm a marine engineer, Mr.President. I steer well clear of political involvement. First encounter of Pitt with Brain Shaw, Pitt after saving Shaw from the death grip of Foss Gly. Who are you?, he mumbled. Pitt. Dirk Pitt. Strange, you don't look like the devil. Shaw had never doubted where he would eventually wind up. On previous encounter Harrison Moon was tossed by Pitt when he was not allowed to meet the President in the White House. After knowing about Pitt, Moon meets Pitt in old car auction. Mr.Pitt? Pitt turned and looked into the babyish face of Harrison Moon IV. Funny, Pitt said without surprise, you didn't strike me as the type who would be interested in old cars. Actually, I'm interested in you. Pitt gave him an amused look. If you're gay, you're wasting your time.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bill Seaward

    The sequence of events were too unbelievable to be enjoyable. Results way to convenient.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Philip

    A real page turner. My first Cussler novel. I picked it off the shelf at our old cabin and ended up ignoring my kids all weekend (they weren't too happy with me :) It must take some special talents to write books like these that you simply can't put down.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chris Haak

    This is one of the older Clive Cussler books I’ve read. They’re not great, but they are more of a guilty pleasure in that they’re quick reads and full of action, however implausible.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ken

    Planes, trains, and automobiles may have been a favorite of Cussler's having read through many of his books. I'm reading through several of his series (Pitt, Fargo, Oregon, and Bell) and have begun to notice the great love he has for the aforementioned vehicles. This book is again another exciting book in the Dirk Pitt series. Has some of the typical plot lines but also some twists that are not easily predicted.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Brett Thomasson

    Before Clive Cussler and his "co-authors" worked themselves into a several-books-a-year publishing schedule, as much as three years would elapse between the adventures of National Underwater and Marine Agency scientist, adventurer and Square-Jawed Hero Dirk Pitt. So although Night Probe came out eight years after Pitt debuted, it's only the fifth Pitt adventure and we can see Cussler still working on his storytelling groove. Set in 1989, seven years after the publication date, we find a Un Before Clive Cussler and his "co-authors" worked themselves into a several-books-a-year publishing schedule, as much as three years would elapse between the adventures of National Underwater and Marine Agency scientist, adventurer and Square-Jawed Hero Dirk Pitt. So although Night Probe came out eight years after Pitt debuted, it's only the fifth Pitt adventure and we can see Cussler still working on his storytelling groove. Set in 1989, seven years after the publication date, we find a United States on the verge of economic collapse because of the depletion of Middle Eastern oil supplies and the lack of native-generated alternatives. Almost a quarter of the nation depends on power generated by a massive Canadian hydroelectric plant, but Canada faces the possibility of Quebec seceding from the nation and causing the kind of chaos a precariously-balanced situation doesn't need. Into the mix comes US Navy officer and researcher Heidi Milligan, who has found evidence of a mysterious U.S.- Great Britain "North American Treaty" from 1914 that seems to have disappeared from all public record. Milligan's work brings the treaty to the notice of the president, who directs NUMA and Pitt to locate copies believed to have sunk in the St. Lawrence River after a horrific train accident in 1914. Great Britain, on the other hand, would rather the treaty stay buried and so recalls retired agent Brian Shaw to learn what Milligan knows and stop the recovery. There's quite a bit of skullduggery amongst the various parties of Quebecois separatists, high-level domestic intrigue and bed-hopping, British military secret missions and et cetera and et cetera. Cussler wildly overplots the story and overindulges himself with characters, villainy and geopolitical gamesmanship and commentary that he's not particularly equipped to handle -- one notes the fact that Middle Eastern oil reserves did not run out in the early 1990s, for example. It would be a few books later before Cussler took his strengths -- action scenes, underwater exploration and maritime and oceanographic expertise and straight-ahead, no-frills talespinning -- and drilled down to keep them in the forefront of the Pitt adventures. Night Probe shows a number of those already present, but mires them in way too much et cetera to rank much above middling in the series. Original available here.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Balkron

    My Rating Scale: 1 Star - Horrible book, It was so bad I stopped reading it. I have not read the whole book and wont 2 Star - Bad book, I forced myself to finish it and do NOT recommend. I can't believe I read it once 3 Star - Average book, Was entertaining but nothing special. No plans to ever re-read 4 Star - Good Book, Was a really good book and I would recommend. I am Likely to re-read this book 5 Star - GREAT book, A great story and well written. I can't wait for th My Rating Scale: 1 Star - Horrible book, It was so bad I stopped reading it. I have not read the whole book and wont 2 Star - Bad book, I forced myself to finish it and do NOT recommend. I can't believe I read it once 3 Star - Average book, Was entertaining but nothing special. No plans to ever re-read 4 Star - Good Book, Was a really good book and I would recommend. I am Likely to re-read this book 5 Star - GREAT book, A great story and well written. I can't wait for the next book. I Will Re-Read this one or more times. Times Read: 1 I love Dirk Pitt and Al Giordino. Characters - The characters are great and what make these stories come alive. I have to say Dirk Pitt is one of my favorite characters in a book series. His buddy Al always puts a smile on my face. I really like the characters. Story - The stories are average and fairly typical. I really like the NUMA settings for the stories. In general these are just entertaining situations to place some really fun characters (Dirk and Al). Overall - I started reading these when I was 16. I enjoyed them up until about age 35. My tastes have changed from Military intrigue to Fantasy / SciFi. I would recommend reading these especially for younger males. NOTE: I am going to rate these all the books in this series the same (except for Treasure which was the first one I read and what caused me to read all the others). Some of the stories are a bit better or a bit worse but I can't find 1 (except for Treasure) that would rate a 2 or 4.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ed

    #5 in the Dirk Pitt series. Published in 1981, this series entry takes place in the near future of 1989 after a 1914 prologue. "Dirk Pitt series - May, 1914. Two undercover couriers plummet to watery deaths in twin disasters, taking with them the only two copies of the North American Treaty, a precedent-shattering secret pact between the United States and Great Britain. On both sides of the Atlantic, stunned heads of state immediately order all mention of the treaty obliterated… forev #5 in the Dirk Pitt series. Published in 1981, this series entry takes place in the near future of 1989 after a 1914 prologue. "Dirk Pitt series - May, 1914. Two undercover couriers plummet to watery deaths in twin disasters, taking with them the only two copies of the North American Treaty, a precedent-shattering secret pact between the United States and Great Britain. On both sides of the Atlantic, stunned heads of state immediately order all mention of the treaty obliterated… forever. February, 1989. In the midst of an international crisis, Heidi Milligan, a beautiful, brilliant American naval commander accidentally discovers an obscure reference to the long buried North American Treaty – prompting the President of the United States to the shocking realization that the treaty offers the only salvation for an energy-starved, economically-devastated America. For the United States, possession of this document is suddenly worth billions. But to Great Britain, it’s worth a war. The deadly race is on to locate and raise one of the signed copies of the treaty from its ocean grave – where it has been lying for 75 years. The only American for such a mission is Dirk Pitt, who proved invincible in Raise the Titanic (1976)!"

  26. 5 out of 5

    John Porter

    Okay...I'm Vegas at the Hard Rock Hotel. (Actually, I was going to visit a friend, but he was at a meeting...and in case you don't know, pool areas in Vegas that have swim-up gambling are open to the public. Seriously.) And I start giggling uncontrollably. Is it the aluminimum bottled Bud Lights they are bringing on demand (and I was demanding)? The tackiness of the pool area and people there? No. It was from reading Night Probe! It's a Dirk Pitt novel I've somehow missed, and it's one of the most ove Okay...I'm Vegas at the Hard Rock Hotel. (Actually, I was going to visit a friend, but he was at a meeting...and in case you don't know, pool areas in Vegas that have swim-up gambling are open to the public. Seriously.) And I start giggling uncontrollably. Is it the aluminimum bottled Bud Lights they are bringing on demand (and I was demanding)? The tackiness of the pool area and people there? No. It was from reading Night Probe! It's a Dirk Pitt novel I've somehow missed, and it's one of the most over the top and silly ones of all. Dirk Pitt ends up handing off his old flame to an aging--but still quite randy, apparently--James Bond at the end of the novel. I am not kidding. You would have laughed too. It's got the usual action and wooden dialogue I love, but the ending was just special. So awful and wonderful at the same time, I have to give it three stars.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Michel Cloutier

    I found this book by Clive Cussler a little difficult to follow. I do appreciate that the story took place in my home province of Quebec, Canada so I looked forward to reading it. At the time it was written, the issue of separation was on many peoples mind and it was made an important part of the story. If the outcome was Clive Cussler’s forecast of the future, he was very wrong. I think this book could have been classified in the alternate history genre.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Christian D. Orr

    This was the very first Clive Cussler book I ever read cover-to-cover, back in 1986 at the tender age of 10. Read it a second time at the age of 28, and now for the third time at the age of 38. The book, classic old-school Cussler, hasn't lost its magic; both the regular characters like Dirt Pitt and Al Giordino, and the guest characters like the lovely Commander Heidi Milligan, the diabolical Foss Gly, and the suave British MI6 agent James Bo--er, Brian Shaw, are among the most memorable of any This was the very first Clive Cussler book I ever read cover-to-cover, back in 1986 at the tender age of 10. Read it a second time at the age of 28, and now for the third time at the age of 38. The book, classic old-school Cussler, hasn't lost its magic; both the regular characters like Dirt Pitt and Al Giordino, and the guest characters like the lovely Commander Heidi Milligan, the diabolical Foss Gly, and the suave British MI6 agent James Bo--er, Brian Shaw, are among the most memorable of any Cussler novel.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Barbara ★

    This one was a little too cloak and dagger for my tastes. And Dirk Pitt didn't even enter the story (except for a brief one night stand) until 100 pages in. I did love the conspiracy and how Dirk figured it all out. A thrilling read once Numa and Pitt entered the story. I did have issues with the "heroines" sleeping habits but that's on me and not the story itself (without it things wouldn't have gone as planned). I think later books in the series are better written and more enjoyable.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Greg Strandberg

    Superb suspense! This is one of the best in the Dirk Pitt series, and I really think you should stop reading this rubbish review and get this book. I've read nearly all of the Pitt books now (missing a few later ones), and I think this and Vixen 03 are the best. I love the ending here, and the suspense around the train. Cussler really starts to hit you with his surprise endings around this book, a great formula he'd follow for some time to come. Pick this up...no Superb suspense! This is one of the best in the Dirk Pitt series, and I really think you should stop reading this rubbish review and get this book. I've read nearly all of the Pitt books now (missing a few later ones), and I think this and Vixen 03 are the best. I love the ending here, and the suspense around the train. Cussler really starts to hit you with his surprise endings around this book, a great formula he'd follow for some time to come. Pick this up...now!

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