Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Something New by P. G. Wodehouse, Fiction, Literary

Availability: Ready to download

Ashe was reading listlessly down the column when, from the mass of advertisements, one of an unusual sort detached itself. WANTED: Young Man of good appearance, who is poor and reckless, to undertake a delicate and dangerous enterprise. Good pay for the right man. Apply between the hours of ten and twelve at offices of Mainprice, Mainprice & Boole, 3 Denvers Street, St Ashe was reading listlessly down the column when, from the mass of advertisements, one of an unusual sort detached itself. WANTED: Young Man of good appearance, who is poor and reckless, to undertake a delicate and dangerous enterprise. Good pay for the right man. Apply between the hours of ten and twelve at offices of Mainprice, Mainprice & Boole, 3 Denvers Street, Strand. Ashe, an adventurer at heart, was also uncommonly lazy. As it was, however, he could make an immediate start. It was with fine fervor animating him that he entered the gloomy offices of Mainprice, Mainprice & Boole. His brain was afire and he felt ready for anything.


Compare
Ads Banner

Ashe was reading listlessly down the column when, from the mass of advertisements, one of an unusual sort detached itself. WANTED: Young Man of good appearance, who is poor and reckless, to undertake a delicate and dangerous enterprise. Good pay for the right man. Apply between the hours of ten and twelve at offices of Mainprice, Mainprice & Boole, 3 Denvers Street, St Ashe was reading listlessly down the column when, from the mass of advertisements, one of an unusual sort detached itself. WANTED: Young Man of good appearance, who is poor and reckless, to undertake a delicate and dangerous enterprise. Good pay for the right man. Apply between the hours of ten and twelve at offices of Mainprice, Mainprice & Boole, 3 Denvers Street, Strand. Ashe, an adventurer at heart, was also uncommonly lazy. As it was, however, he could make an immediate start. It was with fine fervor animating him that he entered the gloomy offices of Mainprice, Mainprice & Boole. His brain was afire and he felt ready for anything.

30 review for Something New by P. G. Wodehouse, Fiction, Literary

  1. 4 out of 5

    Apatt

    “Ashe's first impression of Beach, the butler, was one of tension. Other people, confronted for the first time with Beach, had felt the same. He had that strained air of being on the very point of bursting that one sees in bullfrogs and toy balloons. Nervous and imaginative men, meeting Beach, braced themselves involuntarily, stiffening their muscles for the explosion. Those who had the pleasure of more intimate acquaintance with him soon passed this stage, just as people whose homes are on the “Ashe's first impression of Beach, the butler, was one of tension. Other people, confronted for the first time with Beach, had felt the same. He had that strained air of being on the very point of bursting that one sees in bullfrogs and toy balloons. Nervous and imaginative men, meeting Beach, braced themselves involuntarily, stiffening their muscles for the explosion. Those who had the pleasure of more intimate acquaintance with him soon passed this stage, just as people whose homes are on the slopes of Mount Vesuvius become immune to fear of eruptions.” Old Beach is alright but—dash it!—he’s not Jeeves you know. A chappie feels like an ass looking for Jeeves in a Blandings book, but I say—dash it!—you know, and all that rot, some fellows just can’t be replaced, don't you know. Actually, in attempting to channel Wodehouse in his “Freddie Threepwood” mode I suddenly miss Bertie Wooster too; they have a very similar manner of speaking, though Bertie seems to possess a few more brain cells than poor Freddie; probably more fish in his diet. The Blandings series is Wodehouse’s second most popular series. I don’t love it as much as his Jeeves & Wooster stuff but—in the absence of more J&W audiobooks on Librivox—it does brighten up commutes to work very pleasantly. Topping stuff! Something New is the original title of what later became Something Fresh (US edition) with minor modifications. The story is set in the sprawling Blandings castle where the semi-senile Lord Emsworth lives with his family, with his secretary The Efficient Baxter running the place. The story takes place during a house party and features what seems to be Wodehouse’s favorite plot device of somebody trying to steal something that was taken by mistake but the rightful owner—for whatever reason—is too embarrassed to ask for the item back. It this case, it is an ancient Egyptian scarab that was unintentionally purloined by Lord Emsworth during one of his many absent-minded moments. The rightful owner American, millionaire J. Preston Peters, does not want to ask for its return because his daughter is engaged to, Lord Emswort’s vapid son, Freddie. This being the case Mr. Peters hires a young man, Ashe Marson, to steal the precious item back. A lot of skulking in the night, collisions, injuries and food spillage ensue. While not as funny as the Jeeves books I have read, Something New did make me chuckle from time to time, causing my fellow bus passengers to give me funny looks and surreptitiously shift their backsides away. The characters are either charming or wonderfully ridiculous, Wodehouse’s prose and dialogue are the stuff of magic. There is no real substance to the plot, which is the norm for Wodehouse books but does not leave me with much to put in the review. The pottering Lord Emsworth, the idiotic “Honourable Frederick Threepwood”, the always suspicious Baxter and the butler Beach, with his endless health complaints, and others are brilliant comic creations and I highly recommend that you acquaint yourself with them at your earliest convenience. ______________ Notes: • Audiobook credit: Nicely read by Ms. Debra Lynn for Librivox (free audiobooks). She is an American lady and does not attempt any kind of British accent but she reads everything clearly with reasonable nuances. Imagine a nice American lady coming to read to you while you are ill, you are not going to insist that she does accents, are you? • New to Wodehouse? This might help: The Best Books by P. G. Wodehouse You Should Read ______________ Quotes: “Nothing is a greater breach of etiquette and worse form than to tap people unexpectedly on the shoulder. That, it was felt, should be left to those who are paid by the government to do it.” “Whenever he really thought of it the prospect of getting married rather appalled him. A chappie looked such an ass getting married!” “The heart does not stand still. Whatever the emotions of its owner, it goes on beating. It would be more accurate to say that Baxter felt like a man taking his first ride in an express elevator, who has outstripped his vital organs by several floors and sees no immediate prospect of their ever catching up with him again. There was a great cold void where the more intimate parts of his body should have been.” “It was all very well to say that George Emerson had known Aline Peters since she was a child. If that was so, then in the opinion of the Efficient Baxter he had known her quite long enough and ought to start making the acquaintance of somebody else.”

  2. 4 out of 5

    Helle

    (3.5 stars) A light, amusing snack between meatier meals, this is the first installment in Wodehouse’s Blandings Castle series and every bit as silly, witty and delightfully early 20th century (published in 1915) as the other books I’ve read by him (though I think I prefer Jeeves & Wooster). The characters who people the Blandings series are the dotty Lord Emsworth, his no-good but basically harmless son, Freddie, an officious secretary, Baxter, and Beach the butler. However, the two main cha (3.5 stars) A light, amusing snack between meatier meals, this is the first installment in Wodehouse’s Blandings Castle series and every bit as silly, witty and delightfully early 20th century (published in 1915) as the other books I’ve read by him (though I think I prefer Jeeves & Wooster). The characters who people the Blandings series are the dotty Lord Emsworth, his no-good but basically harmless son, Freddie, an officious secretary, Baxter, and Beach the butler. However, the two main characters in this first one – who unfortunately then disappear out of sight after this installment – are Ashe Marson, a writer of detective novels, and Joan Valentine, a woman who lives in Ashe’s building and whom he meets when she laughs at him doing his ‘Larsen exercises’. They are both in need of money and adventure, and after a completely unlikely mix-up of a misplaced scarab, they find themselves at Blandings Castle pretending to be something they are not in order to retrieve said scarab. Misunderstandings ensue, crazy conversations follow and other silly characters enter the scene – in short Wodehouse’s trademark devices abound. Some of the slapstick is a bit too silly for my taste; it’s the little asides that had me chuckling (‘he looked to the wallpaper for inspiration’), and chuckle I did once the whole cast had finally arrived at Blandings Castle. (Already in the preface, we know what we’re in for; here Wodehouse describes why his American editor wanted him to use his full name, Pelham Grenville Wodehouse: A writer in America at that time who went about without three names was practically going around naked.) Evelyn Waugh (a devout fan of Wodehouse’s) had this to say about him and Blandings Castle: 'For Wodehouse there has been no fall of Man. The gardens of Blandings Castle are the original gardens of Eden from which we are all exiled.' His stories may not be profound, but they are quirky, funny, utterly English (from a time gone by, alas), witty and heartwarming.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bruce

    Delightfully light bedtime reading, a few pages each night. No author is quite like P.G. Wodehouse; he is the master of cliche - cliche of plot, of characters, of description, of dialogue. And yet he manages to accomplish all this with lightness and freshness. Which is what makes him so very droll and delightful. His books are absolute fluff, and what wonderful fluff it is!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Veronique

    Something Fresh, first instalment of the Blandings series, is a brilliant comedy. Once again, Wodehouse succeeds in juggling with several convoluted plot threads to great entertainment. It is truly amazing how he doesn't get entangled!!  Lord Emsworth, the forgetful and kleptomaniac earl of Blandings Castle, has appropriated himself of the prized possession of a wealthy American collector, who happens to be the father of his youngest son's fiancee. One can only imagine the ire of the hypochondria Something Fresh, first instalment of the Blandings series, is a brilliant comedy. Once again, Wodehouse succeeds in juggling with several convoluted plot threads to great entertainment. It is truly amazing how he doesn't get entangled!!  Lord Emsworth, the forgetful and kleptomaniac earl of Blandings Castle, has appropriated himself of the prized possession of a wealthy American collector, who happens to be the father of his youngest son's fiancee. One can only imagine the ire of the hypochondriac magnate who will do anything to get his scarab back, even to the extend of employing someone to steal it back. Add to this a romance or two, blackmailing, a detective writer, a secretary with bulldog tendencies, and a butler with a troubled stomach. Life is anything but quiet at Blandings, especially in the middle of the night!!! Although this novel was published in 1915 and shows a social world that doesn't exist anymore, Wodehouse is still a brilliant read today due to his colourful characters (all larger than life and yet believable), witty dialogue, and scene staging. The resulting book is not only extremely entertaining but also very cinematographic. I often had the impression of seeing a film while reading it :0)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Gehna

    4.5 Ashe and Joan Stars!! Ashe and Joan, because they were my favorite characters in this book. This is my first PG Wodehouse book and it was so much better than I expected it to be!! This book is about a gathering in Blanding Castle where three people are after a scarab for their own purposes. The owner of the scarab is a very absent minded person and does not really care about the scarab so it is only those three people who will be at loss if the scarab is stolen by a forth unknown person. The 4.5 Ashe and Joan Stars!! Ashe and Joan, because they were my favorite characters in this book. This is my first PG Wodehouse book and it was so much better than I expected it to be!! This book is about a gathering in Blanding Castle where three people are after a scarab for their own purposes. The owner of the scarab is a very absent minded person and does not really care about the scarab so it is only those three people who will be at loss if the scarab is stolen by a forth unknown person. The whole book is full of witticism and lots of puns :D Ashe and Joan are the best elements of this book. Ashe, a handsome story writer happens to meet Joan, who is independent woman and together they try to steal the scarab for some money. (view spoiler)[They don't get the scarab but they surely get each other. (hide spoiler)] Overall, it was a wonderful read. Loved it a lot! Recommended to everyone!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bev

    Something New (1915) is the first installment of P. G. Wodehouse's Blandings Castle stories. This story follows Ashe Marson into the drafty halls of Blandings Castle, where he will try to make "something new" of his life by purloining a rare Egyptian scarab — all for the best motives, of course. Ashe Marson is a hack writer who churns out pulp detective stories which involve The Adventures of Gridley Quayle. Tired of this life, but not quite knowing what to do about it, he makes the acquaintance Something New (1915) is the first installment of P. G. Wodehouse's Blandings Castle stories. This story follows Ashe Marson into the drafty halls of Blandings Castle, where he will try to make "something new" of his life by purloining a rare Egyptian scarab — all for the best motives, of course. Ashe Marson is a hack writer who churns out pulp detective stories which involve The Adventures of Gridley Quayle. Tired of this life, but not quite knowing what to do about it, he makes the acquaintance of his upstairs neighbor Joan Valentine. She prompts him to action: "Read the papers. Read the advertisement columns. I'm sure you will find something sooner or later. Don't get into a groove. Be an adventurer. Snatch at the next chance, whatever it is." And he does. After reading and answering the following want ad: Wanted--Young Man of Good Appearance who is poor and reckless, to undertake delicate and dangerous enterprise. Good pay for the right man. he finds himself in the employ of J. Preston Peters. He will appear as this American millionaire's valet on a trip to Blandings Castle, but his real mission will be to steal back a priceless scarab which has made its way into Lord Emsworth's collection through a series of misadventures. What follows is a delightful romp through the halls of the English country home...it seems everyone in the Castle has a reason to be roaming about at night and what should be a very simple little matter of picking up the scarab (it's not even in a locked case) and stowing it away in a handy pocket becomes a veritable circus of unlikely events. Who knew so many people would be interested in the scarab? This may be early Wodehouse, but he is already on the top of his game with ready wit and impossible situations. I found myself chuckling throughout the entire piece. The night-time adventure involving Baxter (Lord Emsworth's impeccable secretary), a bottle of wine, a bit of cold tongue and various bits of crockery and furniture is the highlight of the adventure. I look forward to future adventures at Blandings Castle as I make my way through the remainder of my Wodehouse Challenge books. Four stars.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Hana

    Great fun and a perfect mid-winter cheering potion. This (I am delighted to say) is the first of a whole series of satiric novels set at Blandings Castle and featuring the absent-minded Lord Emsworth and his clueless son Freddie. If British upper class really was this dumb, and I suspect great swaths of it might have been, it's a wonder the country survived and no wonder at all the the Empire was lost. Plenty of sharply humorous elbow digs at upstart Americans, the hack publishing industry, overz Great fun and a perfect mid-winter cheering potion. This (I am delighted to say) is the first of a whole series of satiric novels set at Blandings Castle and featuring the absent-minded Lord Emsworth and his clueless son Freddie. If British upper class really was this dumb, and I suspect great swaths of it might have been, it's a wonder the country survived and no wonder at all the the Empire was lost. Plenty of sharply humorous elbow digs at upstart Americans, the hack publishing industry, overzealous staff, etc. Wodehouse fans will revel in his trademark witty dialog and madcap plotting and will find this one all the more endearing thanks to a charming couple of young people who are clearly meant for each other right from their very first, very funny meeting. You'll be rooting for them, too. Content: G with some ethically questionable goings on surrounding a missing scarab.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Vimal Thiagarajan

    The book that marked the transformation of Wodehouse from a good writer to a phenomenon.Its an amazing experience to see him effortlessly driving into every turn in the language and painting every shade of humour that can ever occur to the human mind.

  9. 4 out of 5

    John

    The first of the Blanding Castle series. I am hooked. The absent minded Earl, Freddie the second son and a complete sap. Throw in an American millionaire with bad digestion, a daughter betrothed to Freddie and you have a great farce. The two worlds of the upstairs and downstairs are hilarious with both having that crazy British class distinction. The setting of Blanding castle and the scarab farce is hilarious. I enjoyed how Ashe wooed Joan and I look forward to reading the next installment.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Algernon (Darth Anyan)

    from the cover of my edition: Wodehouse is the greatest comic writer ever. . I have no quarell with this Douglas Adams quote, it may set the stakes rather high, but the first book of the Blandings Castle Saga rises to the occasion and provided a jolly good time. Maybe not the best of the series, being one of the author's early books published first in 1915, but a solid introduction to the characters and the setting that would draw the author back for 10 more novels and 9 short stories. And wha from the cover of my edition: Wodehouse is the greatest comic writer ever. . I have no quarell with this Douglas Adams quote, it may set the stakes rather high, but the first book of the Blandings Castle Saga rises to the occasion and provided a jolly good time. Maybe not the best of the series, being one of the author's early books published first in 1915, but a solid introduction to the characters and the setting that would draw the author back for 10 more novels and 9 short stories. And what a lovely place this is: Note: my review is for the Something New original text. I understand the only important difference to the Something Fresh revised edition is the American origin for some of the characters. Actually, this is what I would like to start with: the novel is built around two opposing world views, the dynamic, decisive and fresh cousins from across the ocean meeting the complacent, slightly clueless and decadent upper class from the home country. The story doesn't actually get to Blandings Castle until quite late in the proceedings. The action starts in London, on a beautiful Spring morning, with the meeting between to young expats down on their luck: Ashe Marson and Joan Valentine, both writers of stories for popular magazines, after trying various other positions on the job market. The American contingent is completed by a friend of Joan, mild mannered Aline Peters, her millionaire father: J. Preston Peters, a collector of scarabs, and a childhood friend of Aline, Mr. George Emerson. Leading the British pack is Clarence, Lord Emsworth - 9th of the line, his younger son, the Honorable Freddie Threepwood, engaged to Aline and an ardent fan of the detective stories written by Ashe, numerous relatives and servants at the castle plus a shady Londoner that goes by the name of R. Jones. The plot is the usual fare for a Wodehouse novel, involving a lavish country house, fake identities, engagements in danger of being broken, absent minded nobility and stern servants, hijinks in the middle of the night (best scene in the book by far) trying to steal a hilarious McGuffin in the form of an Egyptian scarab of the reign of Cheops of the Fourth Dynasty, and the inevitable blossoming of romance : If girls realized their responsibilities they would be so careful when they smiled that they would probably abandon the practice altogether. There are moments in a man's life whe a girl's smile can have as important results as an explosion of dynamite.) Wodehouse sense of timing is flawless as usual, coreographing the movements of each character up and down stairs, in and out of guestrooms and servants quarters, strolling around the park or dashing into the neighboring village, like a master puppeteer with ten hands instead of two. Of the Blandings Castle characters of note, the Efficient Baxter, secretary to Lord Emsworth (more interested in gardening and furniture painting than in his numerous guests), is the one who pushes the story forward, acts as a self appointed crime investigator and is the victim of most of the jokes and pranks, a role that would later be taken by various village policemen. Some of my favorite scenes from the novel describe the rigid pecking order among the serving staff led by Mr Beach, the head butler and Mrs Twemlow, the housekeeper. This is all a great puzzle for the libertarian Ashe, a sequence used by the author to ridicule the affectations of the English society. An apparent paradox, where the lower classes are adherring to the rules more strictly than the masters, seen also in the relations between Jeeves and Bertie Wooster. Speaking of Bertie, there's a guest at the castle that I'm curious about and would like to know more about: The Honorable Algernon Wooster. It's not only the coincidence of my Goodreads nickname (this comes from another book about a mouse), it's the question of his relation with the hero of the other major series by Wodehouse, and where else he makes an appearance. He plays quite a minor role here, but I would like to meet him again. A second theme of ardent social actuality at the time and present in many Wodehouse novels, is the emancipation of women, a battle that was far from won in 1915. It is left to fiery, self-reliant Joan Valentine to carry the torch for womanhood and to cut young Ashe attempts at chivalry in the bud, demanding equal treatment and a share in all the excitement: It won't do, Mr. Marson. You remind me of an old cat I once had. Whenever he killed a mouse he would bring it into the drawing-room and lay it affectionately at my feet. I would reject the corpse with horror and turn him out, but back he would come with his loathsome gift. I simply couldn't make him understand that he was not doing me a kindness. He thought highly of his mouse and it was beyond him to realize that I did not want it. You are just the same with your chivalry. It's very kind of you to keep offering me your dead mouse; but honestly, I have no use for it. I won't take favors just because I happen to be a female. Beside the already mentioned timing, the author is renowned for his use of the English language. While I felt that Something Fresh had less of his signature intricate constructions and wild similes, there were many pages where I stopped to re-read and savour a particular turn of phrase like sipping a fine dram of old scotch. Here's one I selected for the closing of my remarks: Among the compensations of advancing age is a wholesome pessimism, which, though it takes the fine edge off of whatever triumphs may come to us, has the admirable effect of preventing Fate from working off on us any of those gold bricks, coins with strings attached, and unhatched chickens, at which ardent youth snatches with such enthusiasm, to its subsequent disappointment. As we emerge from the twenties we grow into a habit of mind that looks askance at Fate bearing gifts. We miss, perhaps, the occasional prize, but we also avoid leaping light-heartedly into traps. Hurray for the youthfull leaps I say. They make for great comedy.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    Imagine Oscar Wilde-lite and you've got P.G. Wodehouse. Wodehouse isn't as political as Wilde, he isn't quite as scathing in his criticism of society, and he isn't as bitingly funny, but that makes him no less entertaining. Wodehouse is a master of bright and breezy. Stephen Fry says that Wodehouse is "sunlit perfection," and I couldn't agree more. The first of the Blanding books, Something Fresh, fits this description like the dot on a lower case i. Something Fresh is light without being lightwe Imagine Oscar Wilde-lite and you've got P.G. Wodehouse. Wodehouse isn't as political as Wilde, he isn't quite as scathing in his criticism of society, and he isn't as bitingly funny, but that makes him no less entertaining. Wodehouse is a master of bright and breezy. Stephen Fry says that Wodehouse is "sunlit perfection," and I couldn't agree more. The first of the Blanding books, Something Fresh, fits this description like the dot on a lower case i. Something Fresh is light without being lightweight. It is silly without being stupid. It is comic without being comical. It is ingenious without being genius. It is good without being great. In other words, it is a perfect read when you're stuck between a massive work like Gravity's Rainbow and a pulpy mess like The DaVinci Code. My only regret at the end of Something Fresh is that we won't see more of Ashe Marsen or Joan Valentine or Mr. Peters (who could easily have starred in their own comedy/mystery television show in the eighties). They are off to America. Instead, we'll be stuck with old-lolly Emsworth and the Honourable Freddie. But that's okay. The bumbling pair will undoubtedly give me plenty to smile about in Leave it to Psmith. And there's no hurry to get there. Wodehouse doesn't inspire hurry. He inspires comfortable languor. Blandings will be there when I need it, and I will be comforted when I move into that strange castle once again.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Fun and witty. A different feel from the Jeeves and Wooster books though since our hero and heroine in this book are completely capable instead of like our dear Bertie who is an absolute imbecile. It's not to say that there aren't imbeciles in this book. There are plenty. They just don't have a star role.

  13. 5 out of 5

    david

    Just the best. The absolute equal in literature of the 'Marx Brothers' in film. But more prolific.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

    Cross-posted to BookLikes. "The sunshine of a fair Spring morning fell graciously upon London town. Out in Piccadilly its heartening warmth seemed to infuse into traffic and pedestrians alike a novel jauntiness, so that 'bus-drivers jested and even the lips of chauffeurs uncurled into not unkindly smiles. Policemen whistled at their posts, clerks on their way to work, beggars approached the task of trying to persuade perfect strangers to bear the burden of their maintenance with that optimistic v Cross-posted to BookLikes. "The sunshine of a fair Spring morning fell graciously upon London town. Out in Piccadilly its heartening warmth seemed to infuse into traffic and pedestrians alike a novel jauntiness, so that 'bus-drivers jested and even the lips of chauffeurs uncurled into not unkindly smiles. Policemen whistled at their posts, clerks on their way to work, beggars approached the task of trying to persuade perfect strangers to bear the burden of their maintenance with that optimistic vim which makes all the difference. It was one of those happy mornings." Out into this happy morning steps Ashe Marson, a young man who writes popular crime novels. A young woman laughs merrily at him as he does his daily exercises. When he retreats into his office and begins work on his next story, THE ADVENTURE OF THE WAND OF DEATH, the young woman (Joan Valentine) comes to apologize, and they proceed to have a marvelous conversation about what exactly a WAND OF DEATH might be. A few pages later, both of them are on their way to Blandings Castle to recover a precious scarab and collect the reward, and we're off along with them. I quoted that whole paragraph at the beginning, because when discussing Wodehouse, I always come back to his effervescent, inimitable language. It's impossible to describe; one can only quote. I could equally well have chosen many other passages, for this particular novel is full of wonderful ones. I don't laugh out loud all that much while I'm reading, usually; reading this I laughed so many times that my husband finally inquired what I was reading. All I had to say was "Wodehouse." Besides the language, this book has especially good characters and relationships. Joan and Ashe continue to have excellent banter, but they also have some wonderful interplay in which Joan tells Ashe in no uncertain terms that she isn't to be treated like fine china just because she's a woman. Romantic relationships in Wodehouse often feel a bit rote -- they're not really his forte -- but this one is convincingly real. There is of course also the absent-minded Lord Emsworth himself, and though this is his earliest appearance and he's bereft of many of his usual supporting characters (notably his brother Sir Galahad, his sister Lady Constance, and his prize-winning pig, the Empress of Blandings), he's still his usual charmingly bumbling self. Happily for Lord Emsworth, he does already have the services of magisterial butler Beach (who has a hilarious interlude with Ashe, describing his Ingrown Toenail, Swollen Joints, and Lining of his Stomach) and the Efficient Baxter, secretary extraordinaire. This may be early Wodehouse, but it's something fresh, funny, and first-class.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jovana Vesper

    "Something fresh" is simply wonderful lil'story that made me laugh out loud, literally! Characters are full of life and their machinations and incidents are hilarious. But the true star of this book (actually, any book by P.G.) is the language. Wodehouse writes with such wit and humor, using all kind of old terms (okay, I guess they where contemporary at the time of writing) that I have not encountered before but nevertheless made me chuckle and stimulate my imagination. I adore him, and will al "Something fresh" is simply wonderful lil'story that made me laugh out loud, literally! Characters are full of life and their machinations and incidents are hilarious. But the true star of this book (actually, any book by P.G.) is the language. Wodehouse writes with such wit and humor, using all kind of old terms (okay, I guess they where contemporary at the time of writing) that I have not encountered before but nevertheless made me chuckle and stimulate my imagination. I adore him, and will always read his books.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Delightful! (Of course.) Though I miss the zing of Wooster's slangy dialogue, there was an abundance of the sort of wacky mayhem for which Wodehouse is known and loved. A betrothal, a house party, a stolen artifact, and several attempts to break up young lovers and restore the artifact all add to the fun.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Shauna

    We are introduced to the wonderfully eccentric Earl of Emsworth and his household. The theft of a valuable scarab provides the principle plot but there is plenty of fun to be had both above and below stairs with some great comic characters.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sandeep

    The best thing about this book (like Jeeves) is that its the first book of a long series so yeah im in for a never ending comical treat. My introduction to the world of Blandings Castle finally! Almost all the characters (except the group of maids and valets) were interesting and had a touch of eccentricity enough to tickle your funny bone. I thought there was a change of tone in writing compared to the first wodehouse book I read which was My Man, Jeeves but the writing was solid with lots of q The best thing about this book (like Jeeves) is that its the first book of a long series so yeah im in for a never ending comical treat. My introduction to the world of Blandings Castle finally! Almost all the characters (except the group of maids and valets) were interesting and had a touch of eccentricity enough to tickle your funny bone. I thought there was a change of tone in writing compared to the first wodehouse book I read which was My Man, Jeeves but the writing was solid with lots of quotable lines and still manage to exercise your mouth with funny situations described in the book and mental thoughts of the characters. Only thing I disliked was the unwanted hierarchy of servants described and their conversations. Nevertheless there were lot of funny scenes and best was the one with Ashe, Emerson and Baxter meeting below the stairs haha! poor Baxter. and events following it. A must read book and great author to read that will magically make u chuckle and smile in this chaotic and stressful life.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    This review is for this audiobook edition only. For my thoughts on the book, see my Kindle edition. I love Jonathan Cecil's narration for Wodehouse & this is no exception. One aspect I noticed is that Chapter 9 & 10 differed a fair amount from the text in my Kindle edition from Project Gutenberg -- I wonder if the Gutenberg edition was a revised 'American' edition...

  20. 4 out of 5

    Antonomasia

    [4.5] Truly delightful. Most other people must be experiencing something like this when they read Wodehouse. My opinions of twenty-odd years ago aren't much changed, it seems: repeating myself, but I'd read part of a Jeeves book in the public library and didn't quite understand what all the fuss was about, yet a while later borrowed Service With A Smile and loved it. Just took me an inordinately long time to get round to more. So it's not that I can't quite warm to Wodehouse, it's that I can't q [4.5] Truly delightful. Most other people must be experiencing something like this when they read Wodehouse. My opinions of twenty-odd years ago aren't much changed, it seems: repeating myself, but I'd read part of a Jeeves book in the public library and didn't quite understand what all the fuss was about, yet a while later borrowed Service With A Smile and loved it. Just took me an inordinately long time to get round to more. So it's not that I can't quite warm to Wodehouse, it's that I can't quite warm to J&W, but I do like Blandings. Given how many friends like Wodehouse, it's nice to feel clubbable in one sense rather than the other. Somewhere or other, there will still be people I'd generally like saying "I wouldn't trust anyone who didn't love Jeeves and Wooster" (and it does seem, in England at least, like a significant marker of character) but as GR has reminded me repeatedly, even with those who most closely share our tastes, there are always major differences of opinion over a handful of favourites. It's something to do with trust: a J&W book isn't cosy to me, because I wouldn't trust the Machiavellian Jeeves as far as I could throw him (and if imagining him the size of Fry, that means not at all, even back at the time when I could bench very nearly my own weight...) I find the relationship between him & Bertie - whom he manipulates, albeit usually in a benign way - too psychologically heavy and complex for the relaxing reading millions of others use the books for, and not all that amusing. The nearest thing to a Jeeves figure in Something Fresh is The Efficient Baxter, who is more or less the adversary of our heroes, and he, unlike Bertie's butler, succumbs to normal human frailties; the Nietzschean concept of the Superman is alluded to more than once around a minor character, Emerson - but no-one is, in the end, shown to be one in the colloquial sense. All are fallible and the more likeable for it. The audience identification character is a widely derided creation among my friends, but regardless there are two wonderful examples here, low-earning, plucky young people of middle-class upbringing whose unorthodox attempts to earn money land them in an adventure pretending to be a valet and maid visiting Blandings. (If only the ending had been tweaked a little, and there were more books about adventuress-on-a-budget Joan Valentine, I would love to read them...) She and Ashe Marson - as well as plenty of page time given to the servants, and a surprising wisdom about the difficulties of the non-rich make this book more inclusive than Wodehouse's reputation for writing about aristocrats might suggest. He has a good natured way of acknowledging that bigger problems than those of his characters exist in the world, and that his books are escapism. He was as completely happy as only a fluffy-minded old man with excellent health and a large income can be. Other people worried about all sorts of things – strikes, wars, suffragettes, diminishing birth-rates, the growing materialism of the age, and a score of similar subjects. Worrying, indeed, seemed to be the twentieth century’s specialty. Lord Emsworth never worried. Nature had equipped him with a mind so admirably constructed for withstanding the disagreeablenesses of life that, if an unpleasant thought entered it, it passed out again a moment later... His name, when he died, would not live for ever in England’s annals; he was spared the pain of worrying about this by the fact that he had no desire to live for ever in England’s annals. He was possibly as nearly contented as a human being can be in this century of alarms and excursions. [Essentially, if one is intelligent and/or has a good memory, it may be inevitable to be concerned about the state of the world.] I had not expected, though, to find a character like this in Wodehouse: There was in [her eyes] a little of November’s cold glitter, too, for Joan had been through much in the last few years, and experience, even if it does not harden, erects a defensive barrier between its children and the world. Her eyes were eyes that looked straight and challenged... It is the compensation which Life gives to those whom it has handled roughly that they shall be able to regard with a certain contempt the small troubles of the sheltered... Life, at that moment, had seemed to stretch before her like a dusty, weary road, without hope. She was sick of fighting. She wanted money and ease and a surcease from this perpetual race with the weekly bills. If you ever had days of scraping around taking a motley variety of jobs, and meeting interesting flotsam and jetsam of humanity along the way, Joan and Ashe will surely make you strangely nostalgic for them. There have always been some people like this (I love the phrasethere is a Free Masonry among those who live in large cities on small earnings - I know the sort of people he means, and - with a handful of notable exceptions - they are usually more interesting than those who went into Proper Jobs straight out of university or school and stayed in them for years.) These pre-1920s twentysomethings seem closer to the typical circumstances of post-crash millenials than to the post-war job for life generation. The plot became easy to imagine transposed to modern London - where Joan and Ashe would presumably be doing irregular IT & web work rather than writing pulp fiction - and mildly dodgy business in which an oligarch needs young native English speakers for some social scheme, for which they will be rewarded with enough money to buy a very nice house for themselves. (I discovered this calculator - warning; Daily Mail owned site - for values of money in every year since 1900, which gives an idea of just what a big deal £500 or £1000 was; prices of goods that long ago aren't shown but you may have some idea of those anyway.) A handful of other points I found fascinating: "to medicine" isn't just 60s slag after all... it's here. I don't think I'm as absent-minded as Emsworth today*, but I cannot recall a female character who's aged as well as Joan. I couldn't believe she wasn't written at least 50 years later than she was, probably more. These editions haven't been edited, have they? She isn't even presented as an exception the way a lot of historical novelists would: the only time that idea comes up is in passing thoughts of a male character, which the author doesn't approve of: Joan, in Ashe’s opinion, should have played a meeker and less active part. These unworthy emotions did not last long. Whatever his other shortcomings, Ashe possessed a just mind. (Feminism in Wodehouse - not something I've heard spoken of as a topic, but which a) probably exists somewhere as an academic paper, and b) is partly responsible for his enduring popularity.) I never laughed this much reading Jeeves & Wooster. It was with the phrase "a scooper-up of random scarabs" that I first felt the writing was getting into its stride and becoming Wodehouse as I hear him spoken of, and that this was going to be an excellent book. Sure enough, plenty similar followed, as well as some wonderful farce that, for me at least, was all fun and no cringing. (I sometimes have too much sympathy for characters one isn't meant to, which makes it too intense and not funny enough - I've always had this problem with Fawlty Towers.) The usage of words like 'fluffy' and 'random' also made it feel oddly contemporary. The benignity of the authorial voice is just perfect: characters' judgements of each other are clearly laid out, but the narrative has empathy for everyone somewhere, and it's very delicately done, e.g. each, in fact, was to the other a perpetual freak-show with no charge for admission... but they aren't to us because we hear how they feel inside. [Reading some background, including about an eccentric who was born in the real-life Blandings, whilst I can take or leave some of the antics, also uncovered the - to me - inexplicably hilarious idea of "Prepare to meet thy God" painted inside a wardrobe. I can just imagine opening one having arrived somewhere, seeing that and bursting into fits of giggles.] Very interesting to have read this, coincidentally, only a couple of days after watching an old documentary about another aristocratic father and wayward son. Though Blandford was more serious a potential problem than Hon Freddie, as he was the eldest, not a younger son. The series showed that a Duke or Earl today essentially needs to be CEO of a tourism and events business - which Emsworth wouldn't have been able to do, yet whilst Blandings is not open to the public Baxter is a sort of regent, handling complex matters in his stead; there was still a fair bit to do, though not as much. Things have changed, yet not. (Curious about the lowish review numbers for even the most popular Wodehouses on Goodreads, as compared with other books which far fewer people I know off this site have read I had a look at Amazon (uk) sales rankings for a few PGWs, which it turns out - as I suspected - are far higher than those for plenty of works that get lots of attention on Goodreads. There are particular types of big-on-Goodreads book across various genres and reader constituencies; likewise others which are quite popular in countries outside the US and which have very few posts on here. Wodehouse appears to be one of those authors who's still very widely read, yet proportionally less catalogued and reviewed on GR, albeit not so much as is the case for newer fictional and factual works with local [non-US] popularity.) * Or two days later: having left this post as unfinished a couple of days ago, I now can't remember what else I meant to add - other than bits and pieces which have worked their way into posts about books 2 and 3. It is a jumble, but I find myself not caring.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Susan in NC

    I like to start at the beginning of any series, so I was grateful my library had this, the first Blandings novel. I love Jeeves and Wooster and own several books collected over the years, so decided to expand my Wodehouse repertoire, as it were! This was eventually fun, but got off to a slow start for me. We first meet a charming couple scraping by, separately, in a shoddy London boarding house by writing pulp fiction for the same publisher. They meet cute and through a series of mishaps, end up I like to start at the beginning of any series, so I was grateful my library had this, the first Blandings novel. I love Jeeves and Wooster and own several books collected over the years, so decided to expand my Wodehouse repertoire, as it were! This was eventually fun, but got off to a slow start for me. We first meet a charming couple scraping by, separately, in a shoddy London boarding house by writing pulp fiction for the same publisher. They meet cute and through a series of mishaps, end up playing a lady's maid and valet at Blandings Castle, where Wodehouse's usual hilarious misunderstandings, imposters, young love in bloom and dippy aristocrats take center stage. Of course it's silly and outlandish but all good fun! I will seek out more Blandings books and look forward to future visits with Lord Emsworth and the Hon Freddie Threepwood - I'm sure the books will be fun, even if I am a diehard Jeeves and Wooster fan for now!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Madhulika Liddle

    The none-too-nimble-minded Freddie Threepwood is engaged to marry Aline Peters, daughter of an American multi-millionaire. When Freddie’s absent-minded parent, Lord Emsworth, goes to meet Mr Peters (and be shown the man’s huge collection of scarabs), our dotty old earl mistakenly pockets the gem of Mr Peters’s collection, a fine Cheops scarab of the Fourth Dynasty or some such. Lord Emsworth being what he is, he guesses Mr Peters has gifted him the scarab for the little museum at Blandings Castl The none-too-nimble-minded Freddie Threepwood is engaged to marry Aline Peters, daughter of an American multi-millionaire. When Freddie’s absent-minded parent, Lord Emsworth, goes to meet Mr Peters (and be shown the man’s huge collection of scarabs), our dotty old earl mistakenly pockets the gem of Mr Peters’s collection, a fine Cheops scarab of the Fourth Dynasty or some such. Lord Emsworth being what he is, he guesses Mr Peters has gifted him the scarab for the little museum at Blandings Castle—and so, under the aegis of The Efficient Baxter, Lord Emsworth’s exemplary (if irritatingly dogged) secretary—that is where the scarab is put. Mr Peters, though, comes to the conclusion that Lord Emsworth is a smooth-fingered thief. But if Peters demands the scarab back, will this engagement—his only child’s chance of becoming part of one of England’s most illustrious (if dotty) families—not be broken off? Mr Peters can think of only one solution: hire someone to steal it back. That, independently, is also the solution Aline, a doting daughter who can’t bear to see her father mope over the loss of his favourite scarab, also thinks up. So two people land up at Blandings, posing as Mr Peters’s valet and Aline’s maid, respectively—with the sole purpose of stealing back the scarab. In the meantime, too, Freddie has been worrying himself sick that a chorus girl whom he’d once written ardent poetry to (even if he’d never actually met) may sue him for breach of promise—and Freddie’s betrothed, Aline, is being assiduously wooed by George Emerson, a Hong Kong policeman who’s on leave in England. This is the first of Wodehouse’s brilliant Blandings Castle series, and it’s a delight. The plot is—as in nearly all of Wodehouse’s books—deliciously convoluted. The characters are a hoot, and Wodehouse’s language is spot on. (As an example: ‘It was not the busy bar, full to overflowing with honest British yeomen, many of them in the same condition, that Baxter sought…’). Don’t miss this.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

    This first book in the Blandings castle series is a scream! If you like Wodehouse's style then this is a must-read. Only one thing was lacking & that was the pigs... otherwise, Lord Emsworth is at his absent-minded best and Rupert Baxter (view spoiler)[becomes entangled in those events which lead him to be considered insane in some of the later books (hide spoiler)] .

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bettie

    (view spoiler)[Bettie's Books (hide spoiler)]

  25. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    "Perhaps the greatest hardship in being an invalid is the fact that people come and see you and keep your spirits up." (241)After finishing the Jeeves and Wooster series, I decided to move on to Blandings. The first of this series, Something Fresh, started out in a rather rough and disorderly way; I have to admit that I repeatedly missed Wooster and his gentleman's gentleman and the smooth perfection found in the many tellings of their adventures. However, the story eventually picked up, and—whi "Perhaps the greatest hardship in being an invalid is the fact that people come and see you and keep your spirits up." (241)After finishing the Jeeves and Wooster series, I decided to move on to Blandings. The first of this series, Something Fresh, started out in a rather rough and disorderly way; I have to admit that I repeatedly missed Wooster and his gentleman's gentleman and the smooth perfection found in the many tellings of their adventures. However, the story eventually picked up, and—while it never quite reached the highest heights—it finished in a more familiar and Wodehouse-worthy manner.

  26. 4 out of 5

    QNPoohBear

    Ashe Marson is a hack writer of detective fiction and bored to death with his job. He meets Joan Valentine, another hack writer who hates her job. Joan has worked as an actress, a lady's maid and any other work she can get. She encourages Ashe to find something new. Mr. Peters, a brash American businessman is about to marry his only daughter Aline to the Hon. Freddie Threepwood, younger son of Lord Emsworth of Blandings Castle. Freddie is terrified a past indiscretion will come to light and caus Ashe Marson is a hack writer of detective fiction and bored to death with his job. He meets Joan Valentine, another hack writer who hates her job. Joan has worked as an actress, a lady's maid and any other work she can get. She encourages Ashe to find something new. Mr. Peters, a brash American businessman is about to marry his only daughter Aline to the Hon. Freddie Threepwood, younger son of Lord Emsworth of Blandings Castle. Freddie is terrified a past indiscretion will come to light and cause a scandal. Freddie needs this marriage for his father has cut off his allowance. Freddie hires the seedy R. Jones to help her out of his predicament. When Mr. Peters discovers his most valuable scarab is missing from his collection, his knows Lord Emsworth took it. The situation is tricky since the two men will soon be related. He takes his anger out on Aline who turns to her old school mate Joan for comfort and advice. Joan proposes she pose as Aline's lady's maid in order to steal the scarab back. Peters is sure to offer an aware. He advertises for a "Young Man of Good Appearance who is poor and reckless, to undertake delicate and dangerous enterprise." Ashe is eager for the job, despite not knowing how to act as a valet. He refuses to allow Peters to bully him. Ashe knows he can get the scarab back but he hasn't counted on Joan, who is equally confident. Both of the would-be -thieves have to get past the Efficient Baxter, secretary to Lord Emsworth. The Efficient Baxter knows someone is out to steal His Lordship's important gift from Peters. The situation becomes increasingly complicated. On the romance side, the bride-to-be is miserable and her former beau, a policeman, is determined to win her hand in marriage. Ashe discovers he's madly in love with Joan and winning the reward is more important than ever. This is an early P.G. Wodehouse novel set solely in the English countryside. It deals with class and gender issues in a humorous plot. The plot is slow to take off. The beginning is formulaic and slow. I kept falling asleep and didn't really care to keep reading. The plot picks up 3/4 of the way through with a wacky scene in the best screwball comedy style. After that, a twist in the plot kept me reading until the end. The finale needed a few more pages to flesh out the story. Some of the action appears off page. Joan is my favorite character. She's a feminist who believes women can do anything men can do and do it better. She's determined to be independent and strong. She isn't interested in chivalry and she pities Aline for not being able to stand on her own. Ashe isn't a very well developed character. He's kind of bland, in my opinion. He's a modern man in terms of health and fitness but also old-fashioned in terms of his attitude towards women and career outlook. His relationship with Joan takes a back seat to the mystery. The romance is very subtle. Ashe and Joan have some witty dialogue but they don't spend much time together. I wanted a bit more connection between them. The secondary characters really shine. The butler with his constant health complaints made me giggle, as did the absentminded Lord Emsworth. He's not your typical English Lord! His dialogue is amusing, especially his thoughts. His actions during the screwball scene made me laugh out loud. Freddie is a typical young Englishman. He's not very bright and things just happen to him. Any time he tries to take action, something happens to prevent his plan from happening. He's sympathetic for all his faults. Lord Emsworth can't be easy to live with. Mr. Peters is rather a stereotypical brash businessman. Like other Wodhouse characters, he's overweight and unhealthy which showcases Wodehouse's belief in diet and exercise and clean, healthy living. Peters tries to be bold but like Freddie, circumstances remove control from his hands. It's not easy for Peters not to be in control but it makes the story funnier and also makes a more sympathetic character. Aline is my least favorite character. Being a modern woman, like Joan, I felt the same way about her as Joan did. She redeemed herself in the end though and her love triangle turns the plot towards the end. She's a good foil for Joan. Algernon Wooster makes a cameo in this novel. This isn't my favorite Wodehouse novel. It's a little long but still light and a pretty good read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    After hanging around with Jeeves and Wooster, now's the time to visit Blandings castle and fun it was too. A cast of characters as mad as each other and a series of crazy goings on that had me laughing out loud on occasions. Something Fresh, it certainly was.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rusalka

    While I was overseas, I finally bit the bullet and started a Wodehouse. This is an important time in every girl's life, and I am very happen that it occurred while I was actually in Wodehouse country. I am really quite serious about that last part. I cannot imagine a better intro to Wodehouse than I have had. I picked up Something Fresh, the first in the Blandings Castle series, in a bookshop in Oxford. I had luckily discovered that morning, that I had brought the wrong book overseas with me for While I was overseas, I finally bit the bullet and started a Wodehouse. This is an important time in every girl's life, and I am very happen that it occurred while I was actually in Wodehouse country. I am really quite serious about that last part. I cannot imagine a better intro to Wodehouse than I have had. I picked up Something Fresh, the first in the Blandings Castle series, in a bookshop in Oxford. I had luckily discovered that morning, that I had brought the wrong book overseas with me for the September Challenge I was running. So I just had to buy another book. Life is so incredibly hard sometimes. The book starts in the West End of London, which we had just been spending the last week wandering around exploring. I could imagine perfectly the streets or buildings, if I didn't know the exact area it was describing. When we weren't in London, we were up in Oxfordshire visiting my brother who was in an old family manor/stately home which had been converted to a hospice. But it was very similar to what I imagine Blandings would have been like. Just a bit smaller. The book itself was fun. A little old fashioned, but no more than other writers of that era are now. But I can see why he is such an acclaimed writer. The book introduces us to the Threepwood family, their staff and friends. This time we meet them when it looks like Freddie, the youngest and particularly useless Threepwood, has just gotten engaged. The story honestly is a little thin, but that's not why you read Wodehouse. You read him for his interactions between people and his observations of just about everything around them. And when he is does this and pointing out the slight absurdity of it all, he is brilliant. I am not a huge fan of slapstick either, but when it is written in such a dry, sarcastic... British, way. Oh I was nearly crying with laughter on the train. I highly recommend picking it up for a light, fluffy read. For more reviews visit http://rusalkii.blogspot.com.au/

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bill D.

    This is my first Wodehouse not including Wooster and Jeeves. Written very early in his career (1915), it is a Blandings Castle story. I didn't find the characters quite as compelling as Bertie or Jeeves, but that may just be due to my familiarity with those characters from early books and the small screen. Whereas the Jeeves stories are told from inside Bertie's head, "Something Fresh" ("Something New" originally in England) Wodehouse narrates himself more traditionally and lets us look inside e This is my first Wodehouse not including Wooster and Jeeves. Written very early in his career (1915), it is a Blandings Castle story. I didn't find the characters quite as compelling as Bertie or Jeeves, but that may just be due to my familiarity with those characters from early books and the small screen. Whereas the Jeeves stories are told from inside Bertie's head, "Something Fresh" ("Something New" originally in England) Wodehouse narrates himself more traditionally and lets us look inside each character's thoughts. This provides a real treat. His insight into human nature is profound. Certainly the plots are ridiculous - in this one a wealthy American attempting to re-appropriate a 4th Century Cheops scarab from his daughter's absent-minded soon-to-be father-in-law, but the reactions, thoughts, and impulses of the characters are intimately familiar to all. The consequences of those reactions and the chain of coincidences that ensue is where all of the fun occurs. Some of the characters have somewhat exaggerated natures, but those too are familiar. Bertie Wooster (and many of his pals) is pre-figured in the less-developed (and less lovable) Freddie Threepwood. Jeeves, however, is not pre-figured in the butler Beach. (Jeeves serves as valet, not butler, mind you.) It is probably fair to argue that the primary two female love interests are better developed than their counterparts that so frequently become engaged to Bertie. That is largely an artifact of the independent narration; we typically only get the view of the females from Bertie's simple point of view. All said, very enjoyable. Much funnier and much better for your brain than television. I look forward to more Blandings castle stories written after this one to see how he goes about developing the principals. And whom he keeps around.

  30. 5 out of 5

    booklady

    Something Fresh IS! I can’t remember the last time a book had me laughing out loud—you’d think I’d never read this before. (Guess there’s something to be said for my poor memory after all.) But actually, reading P. G. Wodehouse silently to oneself is treat enough, while listening to his stories performed by Frederick Davidson on the audio version doubles the pleasure. The first of the infamous Blanding’s novels introduces Lord Emsworth (Clarence Threepwood, 9th Earl of Emsworth) and the castle i Something Fresh IS! I can’t remember the last time a book had me laughing out loud—you’d think I’d never read this before. (Guess there’s something to be said for my poor memory after all.) But actually, reading P. G. Wodehouse silently to oneself is treat enough, while listening to his stories performed by Frederick Davidson on the audio version doubles the pleasure. The first of the infamous Blanding’s novels introduces Lord Emsworth (Clarence Threepwood, 9th Earl of Emsworth) and the castle itself, lying in the picturesque Vale of Blandings, Shropshire, England, two miles from the town of Market Blandings, a place where time is suspended and the greatest worries is what will be for Tea. There is one particularly hilarious scene after which The Efficient Baxter finds all his efforts to clear his character go unheeded. Anyplace besides Blandings and in any other hands but those of our inestimable author, this would be tragedy. Instead, it was pure mirth. Thank you for the most sublime pleasure! My first visit has come to a close; I’m all ready back at Blandings reading Summer Lightning and listening to Psmith in the City. Summer vacations don't get much better than this ... even if you are cleaning house in between books.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.