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X-Men: Second Coming

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The climax of four years of X-Men stories is the X-Event of 2010! What started in House of M with the Decimation of mutantkind and erupted with the first new mutant birth in Messiah CompleX finishes here. In the epic crossover Second Coming, Cyclops' faith pays off when Cable returns to the present with Hope, the girl he believes to be the mutant messiah. But will she be t The climax of four years of X-Men stories is the X-Event of 2010! What started in House of M with the Decimation of mutantkind and erupted with the first new mutant birth in Messiah CompleX finishes here. In the epic crossover Second Coming, Cyclops' faith pays off when Cable returns to the present with Hope, the girl he believes to be the mutant messiah. But will she be the savior or destroyer of mutantkind? We may never know, as she is the target of an initiative for mutant eradication unlike anything the X-Men have ever experienced. Many will be wounded. Several will die. Is Hope worth it? Collecting: Second Coming: Prepare, 1-2; Uncanny X-Men 523-525; New Mutants 12-14; X-Men Legacy 235-237; X-Force 26-28


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The climax of four years of X-Men stories is the X-Event of 2010! What started in House of M with the Decimation of mutantkind and erupted with the first new mutant birth in Messiah CompleX finishes here. In the epic crossover Second Coming, Cyclops' faith pays off when Cable returns to the present with Hope, the girl he believes to be the mutant messiah. But will she be t The climax of four years of X-Men stories is the X-Event of 2010! What started in House of M with the Decimation of mutantkind and erupted with the first new mutant birth in Messiah CompleX finishes here. In the epic crossover Second Coming, Cyclops' faith pays off when Cable returns to the present with Hope, the girl he believes to be the mutant messiah. But will she be the savior or destroyer of mutantkind? We may never know, as she is the target of an initiative for mutant eradication unlike anything the X-Men have ever experienced. Many will be wounded. Several will die. Is Hope worth it? Collecting: Second Coming: Prepare, 1-2; Uncanny X-Men 523-525; New Mutants 12-14; X-Men Legacy 235-237; X-Force 26-28

30 review for X-Men: Second Coming

  1. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    This was another really good X-men event, and I'm glad I finally got around to reading it. Like the blurb says, this is the conclusion of the plot that started in House of M. But nothing is ever really concluded in comics, is it? No, no it is not. At any rate, you finally get to see whether or not Hope is worth all the fuss. Eh. I suppose so. <--Kidding! But I do think any sort of meh feelings toward Hope's big reveal come from already knowing the spoiler about her powers: (view spoiler)[ (hide sp This was another really good X-men event, and I'm glad I finally got around to reading it. Like the blurb says, this is the conclusion of the plot that started in House of M. But nothing is ever really concluded in comics, is it? No, no it is not. At any rate, you finally get to see whether or not Hope is worth all the fuss. Eh. I suppose so. <--Kidding! But I do think any sort of meh feelings toward Hope's big reveal come from already knowing the spoiler about her powers: (view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)] But that's entirely my fault for waiting so long to read this. The deaths also had less of an impact on me, as most of these guys are already alive and well in the Marvel universe at this point. <--again, my fault. Still, it was great to read how they died in the first place. And since this was (unbelievably) a really well-written story that was (also unbelievably) collected in a way that made the entire event very readable, I thought this was pretty fantastic. If you're a fan of the X-men, you won't want to miss out on this one.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    What's this? A major comic book event that's good? Sure, it happens, but it's rare. It helps when you start from a solid premise that brings together threads that have obviously been years in the making. Granted, I haven't read all of those years of comics. In fact, that's probably the only thing that kept me from absolutely loving this book. It includes two teams (the X-Club and, I think, the New Mutants) that I'm totally unfamiliar with. I didn't need to be to enjoy the book, but I think I wou What's this? A major comic book event that's good? Sure, it happens, but it's rare. It helps when you start from a solid premise that brings together threads that have obviously been years in the making. Granted, I haven't read all of those years of comics. In fact, that's probably the only thing that kept me from absolutely loving this book. It includes two teams (the X-Club and, I think, the New Mutants) that I'm totally unfamiliar with. I didn't need to be to enjoy the book, but I think I would have gotten even more out of it. As is, it's a very entertaining and smarter than average action extravaganza. There's nearly half a dozen writers working on this thing, but their works melds nicely. The art doesn't, not exactly, but the art shifts weren't nearly extreme enough to bother me. I put off reading this for a long time, for a lot of reasons. I had gotten sick of the lack of traction X-Men stories seemed to have. That's changed a bit. (view spoiler)[And I knew that Nightcrawler, my favorite, died here, and I couldn't bring myself to read it until I knew he'd be back. Stupid, I know. (hide spoiler)] I still haven't quite caught up on what happened between Messiah Complex and this, but I'm glad that I at least read that. That's essential to understanding what's going on here, if nothing else.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lᴀʏᴀ Rᴀɴɪ #BookDiet2019

    The X-Men narrative in general has always been a strong allegory for real-life socio-political strifes particularly when it came to many civil rights movements in the late sixties it more or less makes an indirect commentary or allusion to. Long-time writer Chis Claremont inarguably had produced a lot of classic storylines from his seventies-eighties roster, and a few of them tackled hard-hitting issues regarding race wars and discrimination (in stories like God Loves, Man Kills  and The X-Tin The X-Men narrative in general has always been a strong allegory for real-life socio-political strifes particularly when it came to many civil rights movements in the late sixties it more or less makes an indirect commentary or allusion to. Long-time writer Chis Claremont inarguably had produced a lot of classic storylines from his seventies-eighties roster, and a few of them tackled hard-hitting issues regarding race wars and discrimination (in stories like God Loves, Man Kills  and The X-Tinction Agenda ). Running for fifty years now, the X-Men has had multiple titles consisting of ensemble of characters, conflicts and backstories plus big-event crossover story arcs that it can get pretty overwhelming sifting through the entirety of this content to get to the unanimously agreed upon "gems" and "must-reads", and I have made it a self-appointed mission to do just that since 2015 began. It has been an incredibly fulfilling experience with a breadth and magnitude that tends to overwhelm but nonetheless stimulate every nerve ending in my being. It's as intoxicating as the richest wine out there and I will never be done sampling it. I have read the staple classics such as The Dark Phoenix , Age of Apocalypse, and  Days of Future Past  as well as House of M and Messiah Complex (the latter two being prequels to Second Coming), and I must say that my hunger for more X-Men stories only continue to deepen that I don't think I will ever have my fill. And that works just fine for me. There have been moments my appetite was satiated (like when I read The Dark Phoenix and Magneto Testament, my two most favorite story arcs so far). Reading and finishing the fourteen-chaptered epic that was Second Coming brought me that kind of satisfaction again. I was simply impressed. With the collaboration of five writers namely Craig Kyle, Christopher Yost, Matt Fraction, Zeb Wells and Mike Carey, with artists David Finch, Terry Dodson, Ibraim Roberson, Greg Land, Mike Choi, X-Men: Second Coming is an astounding collection that is very climactic in scope, tonality and overall content. The collection includes issues from the titles X-Men,  Uncanny X-Men,  New Mutants, X-Men: Legacy and X-Force and set in the aftermath of the mutant decimation from House of M where Scarlet Witch re-made reality and de-powered mutants across earth that the mutant gene seemed to have been permanently suppressed if not altogether extinct. An anomaly occurs in Messiah Complex where a baby with a mutation was born and all the anti-mutant human factions led by the Purifiers rallied to kill the baby. On the opposing side we had the Marauders led by Mr. Sinister who had other plans for the new mutant baby that are less than altruistic. Meanwhile, the X-Men led by Cyclops have to find a way to ensure the newborn's safety because he or she may be the key to restarting and repopulating the world with mutants again. Suffice to say, the quest was inexhaustible filled with multiple arcs that still manage to be cohesive enough to tell a compelling story. The arc ended with Cable (Scott's son Nathan Summers and a seasoned combat soldier) taking the baby (named Hope) to the future to train her until such time she is ready to return back to her actual timeline and become the "messiah" everyone wanted her to be. This is where Second Coming takes us. The in-the-nose biblical references aside, this particular arc is more comprehensive and understandable than its scattered predecessor. If you're a comics fan who is looking for a lot of action sequences then this collection is already a must-have. The varied visual artwork is always engrossing to look at, and a few of these issue have less dialogues to make room for more brutality and violence which was executed well enough not to be repetitive or underwhelming. As for the storytelling itself, the villains have a more grounded sense of purpose than the last time. Calling themselves The Human Council, they are the most despicable anti-mutant assholes we have known from the past such as Reverend Striker and Cameron Hodge, being led by a Sentinel-based being created solely to destroy the mutant messiah Hope. This motherfucker's name is Bastion and he is relentless in his eradication of mutantkind. The most notable events that happened in Second Coming include the small but important personal dramas that occur between action breaks (and sometimes even during the killing which is really cool). Two fan-favorite characters also give their lives to save Hope, while Scott Summers' leadership abilities and morality are tested time and time again as he make some of the hardest and most jarring choices in the battlefield where his primary objective is to ensure the survival of their species. One of Scott's questionable decisions include the formation of X-Force (which were established in Messiah Complex). They are supposed to operate outside the pacifist ways of the X-Men and will kill and terminate any human who crosses the line. Of course, this is readily opposed by a lot of members of the X-Men such as Nightcrawler, Storm and Professor X himself but Scott dismissed their complaints and pushed through, assigning Wolverine to lead the group during daring and near-death extraction/eradication missions. It's worth noting that for the first time in ever, Scott and Logan actually agree on something, and it's a hefty price they are willing to make. For Scott, it's the mutant species whose number continues to dwindle that he wants to preserve; for Logan, it's his loved ones he will fiercely fight for even it meant blood will be spilled now and then. I would especially like to point out that certain tactics like this are just the first stepping-stone of Scott Summer's "fall from grace" which will be ultimately explored in the crossover event Avengers vs. X-Men. But I digress. That's a story for another time. [CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGES] Second Coming is all about Hope Summers, Cable's adopted daughter and the prophesied messiah who is just a teenager raised in an environment where survival and death are intrinsically inseparable. Most of the time, she doesn't know what to make of the grander scheme of things and it's only her faith in Cable that keeps her grounded. Later on, this same trust will be broken as events around her take a strange and dark corner where she must grow up soon or face utter destruction not just of herself but of the entire race depending on her. This is too much of an obligation to place upon the unsteady shoulders of a teenage girl but Hope, in spite of her insecurities and doubts, has been trained well by Cable. She is tough and mature beyond her years yet constantly torn between that hard-edged version she carefully cultivated around Cable, and the naive and curious teen girl who sometimes wants a life that's normal and less insane than what she is forced to live with while on the run. I like Hope. I thoughts she was sympathetic enough. I like reading about her angst and frustrations and it broke my heart when she got hers broken too. I want to know more about her after this, and I plan to read stories centered on this mutant messiah. One of the things I enjoyed about her was her strained interactions with Scott throughout the story. She never trusted him and would never listen to him. She doesn't get where he's coming from because she has never been a leader and that is her failure. The same thing can be said about Scott. He's been fighting wars for far too long that he forgot what it's like to be young and confused and that made him so alienating to Hope. Given time and under different circumstances, they would have been great allies, considering Scott is her paternal adopted grandfather (technically speaking), but this is probably the only moment they have to get to know each other: in a state where they have to make unpopular decisions. I think their interactions in this volume were enlightening because you can see the contrast in the way they deal and cope with their respective impending doom; it's like they're trapped inside two-ways mirrors looking into each other but never really seeing what is in front of them beyond their personal negative bias, especially Hope. She blamed Scott for everything and I can understand her for that because she's young and the only life she has ever known was the one she had with Cable whom she loved and respected and now she lost him. The climactic issues for Second Coming are definitely the last two at the end. In issue #13, Hope faces Bastion at last and the confrontation was shocking and massive. I was dumbfounded while reading it. Other elements for this story arc included the participation of the Avengers and the Fantastic Four who were basically there to help in any capacity they can but this was a battle for the X-Men and they have been excluded from it by Bastion so all they could do is to maintain the peace on the sidelines as our mutant superheroes have the fight of their lifetime. And that fight was decided by Hope Summers herself. For issue #14, we got the aftermath where the X-Men bury their dead, talked about life-changing decisions, and tried to make sense of the impact of what just happened and what new directions they must take. Of course, things are about to get more complicated with Hope especially after Emma Frost witnessed for herself the possibility that Hope may become the next receptor for the Phoenix Force itself which is definitely terrifying in the scale of biblical proportions. Perhaps Bastion may be right to try and kill Hope after all and that is a thought I never believed I could ever entertained. Emma rushed to inform Scott about it but Scott was far too thrilled to pay attention to this grave news because as he checked Cerebra, it looked as if Hope's coming was an advantage to their species after all. Mutants began popping all over the global map again, and for now that's all the news Scott cared about. That's gonna bite him in the ass soon enough. Nothing is ever a cosmic accident in the X-Men universe after all. In a nutshell, X-Men: Second Coming was a thrilling, engrossing and stupefying action-adventure story with loads of psychological twists and turns and an emotionally resonant tale about a father and daughter, and the latter's struggle to define her place and purpose in the universe. It's engaging in so many ways and is memorable for all the right moments. The ensemble of characters as well as fan-favorites are almost all here with standout performances by Magneto, Rogue, Nightcrawler, Wolverine, Cypher, Cable and the New Mutants. I think it's safe to say that X-Men: Second Coming is very much a top 'must-read' and 'must-have' for an X-Men fan. It's the accumulation of all the conflicts and strenuous relationship dynamics that characters have endured and faced throughout their run in the comics, and it's guaranteed to be a ready crowd-pleaser for its brilliant visuals and the multi-layered narrative approach. RECOMMENDED: 10/10

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    This moves at the pace of an excellent action movie and giant mystery-thriller all at once. Some of the most fun reading comics I've had in ages. I hardly want to look at the great artwork cause I want to drink up the storyline as fast as possible. Spectacular story and artistic renderings - some of the best epic story I've read in a year, and definitely blows away anything X-men related since rejoining comics five years ago. Major deaths, lots of (hopefully) irreversible changes, and new powers t This moves at the pace of an excellent action movie and giant mystery-thriller all at once. Some of the most fun reading comics I've had in ages. I hardly want to look at the great artwork cause I want to drink up the storyline as fast as possible. Spectacular story and artistic renderings - some of the best epic story I've read in a year, and definitely blows away anything X-men related since rejoining comics five years ago. Major deaths, lots of (hopefully) irreversible changes, and new powers to experience. I'm most impressed by how high quality the writing is across all the intertwined series, and how incredibly coordinated the whole story is in the run. It's like the authors finally stopped trying to out-do each other and worked as a team. Love this!

  5. 4 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Damn man back in the day X-Men events were fucking great! So Hope decides it's time to head back to the main timeline. Cable agrees and off they go. Of course when they arrive it all goes to hell. The first half of this book actually feels very similar to Messiah Complex where we have ton of people chasing other people. This time though once things calm down for a moment and Hope is now with the X-Men after losing some big members, the real danger shows up. This becomes a darker more fucked up e Damn man back in the day X-Men events were fucking great! So Hope decides it's time to head back to the main timeline. Cable agrees and off they go. Of course when they arrive it all goes to hell. The first half of this book actually feels very similar to Messiah Complex where we have ton of people chasing other people. This time though once things calm down for a moment and Hope is now with the X-Men after losing some big members, the real danger shows up. This becomes a darker more fucked up event than expected and really shows the complexity of the X-men as a race and how they are working together to survive. Good: Really loved the pacing of this. Each and every issue goes into each other really well. It never feels like a slow part because it's all damn exciting. The art ranges from good (at worst) to GREAT. The teams in here all clash well from the Uncanny team to X-Force, to the new mutants. The deaths stick and work really well here. The fights are epic, and truly show the X-Men grittiness at times. Oh and the ending sets up the future series well. Bad: I thought it might been a bit overstuffed at times, things like having Xavier coming in and Legion and such. Overall this was great. A very compelling and entertaining ending to the trilogy of x-men events (Messiah Complex-Messiah War-Second Coming) and a easy 4.5 out of 5.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nicolo Yu

    X-Men: Second Coming is probably the best X-Men crossover I’ve read in a while. A few more event stories came after it but this is the most recent one where I’ve read all the tie-in books in sequence. It is the third part of a triptych of crossovers that ran in the X-Men family of books that began with Messiah Complex and followed by Messiah War. The biblical references are intentional as the stories centered on Hope, a mutant messiah who may or may save a race facing extinction. The story borrow X-Men: Second Coming is probably the best X-Men crossover I’ve read in a while. A few more event stories came after it but this is the most recent one where I’ve read all the tie-in books in sequence. It is the third part of a triptych of crossovers that ran in the X-Men family of books that began with Messiah Complex and followed by Messiah War. The biblical references are intentional as the stories centered on Hope, a mutant messiah who may or may save a race facing extinction. The story borrowed elements from classic storylines. It mined heavily the past for a story that can for itself on its own merits. These were religious overtones (God Loves, Man Kills, time travel (Days of Future Past), Cable’s sacrifice (X-Cutioner’s Song) and even a hint of the Phoenix. This is a great and exciting story and comes with great art too. This is a significant event that could shape future X-Men stories.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    ★★★★1/2 Wooo! Now that I've come up for air and I can talk about my thoughts on this action-packed blockbuster event! This book brings everything that have happened for our X-men since House of M to a huge climax after Cable returns from the future with the now teenage mutant messiah named Hope. Bastion puts his endgame plan into motion and now the X-men are not only fighting to protect Hope, but also to save the entire mutant race. The book is almost non-stop action from page one and I love the d ★★★★1/2 Wooo! Now that I've come up for air and I can talk about my thoughts on this action-packed blockbuster event! This book brings everything that have happened for our X-men since House of M to a huge climax after Cable returns from the future with the now teenage mutant messiah named Hope. Bastion puts his endgame plan into motion and now the X-men are not only fighting to protect Hope, but also to save the entire mutant race. The book is almost non-stop action from page one and I love the danger and stakes that are felt throughout the entire thing. Knowing the fact that only less than 200 mutants remain in the entire world makes the danger that our heroes are in feel even more dire and makes every death really count. And I loved the fact that everyone not only questions whether Hope is this "messiah" and whether or not all of what they're doing is for nothing, but also questions Cyclops's decisions and actions that he's done in the name of protecting her. You can sense the increasing desperation. It was a great idea reading the Cable series prior to this, because while it's not totally necessary to understand what's going on, the time that I spent watching Hope grow up and see the struggles that her and Cable had to go through to finally get to this point really made this book that much more compelling! This is a great turning point for the mutant universe and with this great ending, I can't wait too see where the next stop in my journey through the modern X-men stories takes me. This X-material during the 2000's was really solid!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    Well now, that was a ride. Definitely in the Top 5 all-time X-Men books. Cable and Hope return from the future, but will it be too late? Also, who will give their lives to save Mutantkind and give everyone hope? The storyline flows seamlessly between all the books, the writers work in tandem, the art is good in it's worst places and spectacular in the best. There's some of the most bad ass frames I've seen in a while, and you really get to see some of your favourite X-Men go postal; full gore mode. Well now, that was a ride. Definitely in the Top 5 all-time X-Men books. Cable and Hope return from the future, but will it be too late? Also, who will give their lives to save Mutantkind and give everyone hope? The storyline flows seamlessly between all the books, the writers work in tandem, the art is good in it's worst places and spectacular in the best. There's some of the most bad ass frames I've seen in a while, and you really get to see some of your favourite X-Men go postal; full gore mode. This book really seemed to hit the head on what the X-Men have always been about, and from this point forward, nothing will be the same, relationships are forever changed, friends may never speak to one another or forgive what took place. You really can't ask for more in a book than that. Essential for any X-book readers or fans.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    What a complete joy to read this was. Huge, comic-booky, ridiculous action and a plot that rivals some of the most classic X-Men stuff around. I wish all of Marvel's major crossovers could come across this big and important. This is a huge turning point for the X-Men side of things, working back toward the return of the mutant race's chance for survival, and I really hope they don't blow it from here. I'll also say this about Second Coming: it does a great job standing on its own. Of the series d What a complete joy to read this was. Huge, comic-booky, ridiculous action and a plot that rivals some of the most classic X-Men stuff around. I wish all of Marvel's major crossovers could come across this big and important. This is a huge turning point for the X-Men side of things, working back toward the return of the mutant race's chance for survival, and I really hope they don't blow it from here. I'll also say this about Second Coming: it does a great job standing on its own. Of the series directly connected to this crossover, the only one I've read with consistency is Uncanny X-Men by Matt Fraction. I didn't read Messiah War, which is this series' direct prequel, though I did read the original Messiah Complex, which eventually builds to this, and I never once felt lost. I may have felt slightly bogged down by the sheer amount of characters, but each writer did a pretty masterful job of either introducing the characters or making it clear that their exact powers and names didn't matter. It's really amazing how well these writers worked together on this. I often find big crossovers with multiple writers to be a little all over the place, with some writers just kind of doing their own thing and going against the grain for whatever reason. Not so here. Each issue picks up right where the previous one leaves off without any hiccups or weirdness. The art may change and the dialogue may read slightly differently, but everything just flows. I'd love for this team to write even more stuff together.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    First of all: What kind of ending is that?! Which title am I supposed to read now? Which issue? I am so confused with all the different titles and the crossovers and, even though I love reading them, it is a bitch realising what comes next. Second: Will the dead stay dead? Or... *fingers crossed* It's X-Men after all. Third: What am I supposed to read now?

  11. 5 out of 5

    Derek

    This volume chronicles the return from the future of Cable and Hope, the last Mutant Child born after M-Day. But their return isn't a happy one. Bastion, the Super Sentinel, also from the future, and hellbent on the total extermination of the Mutant race has come back to see to Cable and Hope's death and thereby seal the Mutantkind's fate. And he's packing quite the heat. Locking them in a sphere that can only be referred to as "Quantum Irresolvable" packing it with a horde of Nimrods. Scott, aw This volume chronicles the return from the future of Cable and Hope, the last Mutant Child born after M-Day. But their return isn't a happy one. Bastion, the Super Sentinel, also from the future, and hellbent on the total extermination of the Mutant race has come back to see to Cable and Hope's death and thereby seal the Mutantkind's fate. And he's packing quite the heat. Locking them in a sphere that can only be referred to as "Quantum Irresolvable" packing it with a horde of Nimrods. Scott, awesome general that he is, sends cable and a bunch of X-men with the new X-man Cypher, into the future to shut down the Nimrods at their source. It's a fierce battle, and doesn't let up until right about the end, and even then all we're left with is a sated kind of relieed feeling. The beauty of Mike Carey's X-men run is there are no fillers, no breathers, it's catastrophe to catastrophe to catastrophe. Conflict to conflict to conflict. It's awesome, is what it is.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Aildiin

    This is actually a lot better than I expected. Most of the art is really great and the story is actually more than good.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Fiona

    Dude that was so good I love life and death drama

  14. 5 out of 5

    Anna Banana

    3.5 stars

  15. 4 out of 5

    Anthony

    Really didn't expect to enjoy this as much as I did. Hope Summers returns, making this a sort of sequel to Messiah Complex and a set up for future stories. It's a pretty big story, in both its scale and in what happens. It's 14 parts, and it spans across about 4 different titles. Buying this in single issues probably would have been hard work, especially if it meant picking up titles you wouldn't usually buy, but now that it's all collected together in a singular format it really works. Each chap Really didn't expect to enjoy this as much as I did. Hope Summers returns, making this a sort of sequel to Messiah Complex and a set up for future stories. It's a pretty big story, in both its scale and in what happens. It's 14 parts, and it spans across about 4 different titles. Buying this in single issues probably would have been hard work, especially if it meant picking up titles you wouldn't usually buy, but now that it's all collected together in a singular format it really works. Each chapter the art chances, which may be jawing for some people. I think what helps it though is that the writing is consistent throughout. It's written by 4 or 5 different writers, but it reads like it's written by only one. As I've already mentioned, the story itself is Hope returning to the time in which she was born (present day Marvel continuity). That leads to several factions wanting to kill her. At first, the story focuses on Hope and Cable on the run, but it soon turns into an all out war for Mutantkind. There's a lot of action in this book, and it's really good. There's also quiet moments to reflect on character deaths, or for characters to stop what they're doing and explain to other people why they're doing whatever it is they're doing. With it being 14 issues long, there's time for both action and character moments. Mostly, the artwork is great. David Finch's opening is some of the best work I've seen by him. Mike Choi puts so much detail into his panels that no captions or word balloons are needed, literally. Terry Dodson is on his usually top form of soft popping art. And then there's Greg Land, who is just shit. I did enjoy it. I don't think it'll be too accessible for new readers, though. They should read Messiah Complex first, at the very least.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Zack! Empire

    I don't have a lot of context for this era of X-Men, but with this book it didn't even matter. Even coming into it basically cold it's still one of the best books I've read lately. It's actually a pretty basic story of Us VS Them, but told insanely well. The thing that really got me was the level of strategy people are actually putting into the fighting. With most superhero books the villain's plan is to show up with a bunch of henchmen, fight the heroes, and hope for the best. But, in this stor I don't have a lot of context for this era of X-Men, but with this book it didn't even matter. Even coming into it basically cold it's still one of the best books I've read lately. It's actually a pretty basic story of Us VS Them, but told insanely well. The thing that really got me was the level of strategy people are actually putting into the fighting. With most superhero books the villain's plan is to show up with a bunch of henchmen, fight the heroes, and hope for the best. But, in this story, the villains have an actual plan, and it's a pretty good one. I don't want to spoil it for you if you haven't read it, but the first move is to draw out the X-Men so they can get rid of the X-Men's teleporters. How smart is that? It isn't just the villains though. Cyclops also has to use some very well thought out strategy, because he is dealing with very limited resources and personnel. It was just great to read a superhero book where they are thinking out the moves, rather then just punchie punchie mcfightenstein. There some really great character moments in here too. Some of them are really cool, and some of them are really sad. This is the kind of story where everyone's back is to the wall, and that is the time when you find out what a person is really made of. Nightcrawler, Wolverine, Cyclops, Storm, Magneto, Cable, Hope, and several others all got some really great moments. Usually in a book you might get two or three really great character moments, but this book has got it in spades. I would definetly recommend this book for fans of Marvel, Superheroes, or X-Men. It's a damn good book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    I had to go back and give Messiah Complex five stars so I could give this four, because this was more a four-star kinda book and I can't stop thinking about Messiah Complex and wanting to reread it, whereas this I would like only reread if I were rereading all of them or whatever, omg that's a lot of books to reread DO YOU EVER THINK I WILL. This one is like super gritty and sad and not fun, but tons of characters doing believable character-driven things and a lot of follow-through, climaxes, nar I had to go back and give Messiah Complex five stars so I could give this four, because this was more a four-star kinda book and I can't stop thinking about Messiah Complex and wanting to reread it, whereas this I would like only reread if I were rereading all of them or whatever, omg that's a lot of books to reread DO YOU EVER THINK I WILL. This one is like super gritty and sad and not fun, but tons of characters doing believable character-driven things and a lot of follow-through, climaxes, narrative resolutions something-something. It's a Pyrrhic victory kinda story, with Cyclops at the end having done every horrible thing and going like "we won!" and all the other characters with their souls empty from the horror being like "yayyyy." I don't even know how they kept letting Cyclops lead after this, he just gets worse. He has my favorite costume but what a d-bag. On the other hand I was sitting in the airport yesterday thinking that the past decade of Cyclops' character going from hero-to-tyrant has to be one of the most drastic yet totally logical progressions I've ever read in superhero comics, very gradual and even when written by ten or fifty different people or whatever. You go superhero comics. You show them the real shit.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Fanning

    I don't have much to say about this other than I loved it? X-Men, end of the world, young girl becoming Who She Is, all my most favorite stuff in the world. There were a few characters who were totally unknown to me, so it was a one-hand-on-wikipedia-deal, but that's how we do it these days. ALTHOUGH OF COURSE I WILL SAY: the fact that there are different artists drawing different parts of the story really put in stark relief which ones are the creeps who somehow always manage to frame women's b I don't have much to say about this other than I loved it? X-Men, end of the world, young girl becoming Who She Is, all my most favorite stuff in the world. There were a few characters who were totally unknown to me, so it was a one-hand-on-wikipedia-deal, but that's how we do it these days. ALTHOUGH OF COURSE I WILL SAY: the fact that there are different artists drawing different parts of the story really put in stark relief which ones are the creeps who somehow always manage to frame women's butts perfectly in each panel. Like viewing the scene of carnage from just behind Rogue's butt is somehow integral to the appreciation of the storyline. Also please stop with Psylocke's costume, whoever designed it is a jerk. "I'm a mutant who wields psychic knives, so I guess my costume should be a onesie thong? And maybe I'll tie this thin scarf around my waist, just for fun! And when I fight I'll be bending over a lot." Guhghghghg forever. Luckily the story is so great.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Julia França

    Part 3/3 of the Messiah Complex Event. Definitively my favorite of the three. Had more emotion, more action, more surprises. It was very good. My only complaint is that the art wasn't very fluid, I could notice perfectly when the work of an illustrator ended and the next began. Otherwise it would have been practically flawless.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jedhua

    ABSOLUTE RATING: {3+/5 stars} STANDARDIZED RATING: <3/5 stars>

  21. 4 out of 5

    ellis

    okay, overall a cool event! definitely some boring bits that i skimmed - i hate action scenes - but tons of really great character moments! art ranged from eugh to meh to nice. some of these men can't draw teenagers tho and it shows!!!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jenna Scherer

    Hey, it's a giant crossover event that doesn't get crushed beneath its own bloat!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Emmett Spain

    The best Marvel crossover event I’ve ever read. Period. This is a second reading for me (first read Feb 2011), and I must say I marvelled (pun!) at the execution of this work. The story moves from beat to beat seamlessly, weaving multiple storylines together with apparent ease. The art, whilst not always complementary in style, is action-packed without being overly busy. But most importantly, I was made to care. There are real stakes here, as opposed to the usual thing WHERE AN UNSTOPPABLE FORCE I The best Marvel crossover event I’ve ever read. Period. This is a second reading for me (first read Feb 2011), and I must say I marvelled (pun!) at the execution of this work. The story moves from beat to beat seamlessly, weaving multiple storylines together with apparent ease. The art, whilst not always complementary in style, is action-packed without being overly busy. But most importantly, I was made to care. There are real stakes here, as opposed to the usual thing WHERE AN UNSTOPPABLE FORCE IS COMING AND OH NO WE BEAT IT AND ONE CHARACTER DIED AND NOW WE HAVE TO LAUNCH A BUNCH OF NEW BOOKS!! Here, several main characters are killed. Here, the mutant race is dwindling, and every death brings them that much closer to extinction. And here, Lord help me, the bad guy actually has a damn good plan for taking out the X-Men! It actually makes clear strategic sense! The only downside is that the bad guy’s motivation amounts to ME LIKEY TO WIPE OUT THE MUTANTS. Even so, he’s given some minor moments of character shading, which add at least some dimension to an otherwise paper-thin character. Thankfully, the bad guy is not the point. What matters are the X-Men, who are irrevocably changed by this event, and not in a “we need to launch some books” kind of way. They are fractured, split, and in a way, reborn. It’s damn good storytelling, and why I love comics: the scale achieved here is beyond what other mediums can typically accomplish. It does require some knowledge of the X-Universe, though. The uninitiated will wonder who the heck everyone is, and there’s little done to help them, outside of enough exposition to help the story make clear sense. Still, this is the best of the best from my point of view, and comes on the heels of another top notch X-Crossover, Messiah Complex. X-Fans, if you missed this, I highly recommend you get on it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Beausephus

    Exactly why I stopped reading X-men comics years ago. Convoluted plots with no real stakes except the ones the writers make sure every character talks about so we as readers supposedly feel the importance of the ultimately non-important event. Too many characters, and too many retreads of characters that should have been laid to rest decades ago (Cameron Hodge? William Stryker?). Forced characterizations, and cliche "confrontations" combined with the divergent styles of the multiple titles colle Exactly why I stopped reading X-men comics years ago. Convoluted plots with no real stakes except the ones the writers make sure every character talks about so we as readers supposedly feel the importance of the ultimately non-important event. Too many characters, and too many retreads of characters that should have been laid to rest decades ago (Cameron Hodge? William Stryker?). Forced characterizations, and cliche "confrontations" combined with the divergent styles of the multiple titles collected in one edition make SECOND COMING yet another frustrating X-Men experience for those of us not beholden to the ever-changing X-Men canon.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    X-ceptional! One of the great self-contained X-men arcs (cameos by some Avengers and the Fantastic Four notwithstanding), Cyclops and co. are pushed to the absolute limit in the aftermath of House of M clinging to the island sanctuary of Utopia while the worldwide population of mutant kind has been reduced to less than 200. With numbers like that the sundry forces of mutant hate and fear unite under the leadership of a savage sentinel from the future in the hopes of isolating and then eliminating X-ceptional! One of the great self-contained X-men arcs (cameos by some Avengers and the Fantastic Four notwithstanding), Cyclops and co. are pushed to the absolute limit in the aftermath of House of M clinging to the island sanctuary of Utopia while the worldwide population of mutant kind has been reduced to less than 200. With numbers like that the sundry forces of mutant hate and fear unite under the leadership of a savage sentinel from the future in the hopes of isolating and then eliminating all those who carry the X gene once and for all. The situation is truly desperate but, as always, there is Hope...

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sonic

    This is how it is done! Fun thrilling stuff with excellent writing and art throughout!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    Haven't read an omen story this good in a very long time. Sad to see a couple of characters killed off.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tundextra

    Collaboration. That's what this event reeks of. Carey, Fraction, Kyle, Yost, Swierczynski and Wells, left egos at the door to bring together the culmination of over a few years' story lines into this exquisite chapter in X-people history. Cable and Hope return and Bastion and his myriad forces have a plan... The only thing that can stop them are the few remaining mutants, most of whom reside on Utopia. Cyclops will have to make enemies of friends, and maybe even the Avengers, because these are t Collaboration. That's what this event reeks of. Carey, Fraction, Kyle, Yost, Swierczynski and Wells, left egos at the door to bring together the culmination of over a few years' story lines into this exquisite chapter in X-people history. Cable and Hope return and Bastion and his myriad forces have a plan... The only thing that can stop them are the few remaining mutants, most of whom reside on Utopia. Cyclops will have to make enemies of friends, and maybe even the Avengers, because these are the last days, and every mutant is an X-Man! He just hopes he's right! 10 out of 12.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Michael Hicks

    (This review was originally published by GraphicNovelReporter.com on Sept. 29, 2010) In HOUSE OF M, the mutant population was eradicated from 16 million souls to only a few hundred. Facing numbers too low to ensure the continuation of their species, the survivors face extinction. The first mutant to be born since M-Day, Hope, was hunted down by rival factions of mutants seeking to control her and antimutant hate groups that wanted her dead. Rescued by the X-Men, she was sent into the wastelands o (This review was originally published by GraphicNovelReporter.com on Sept. 29, 2010) In HOUSE OF M, the mutant population was eradicated from 16 million souls to only a few hundred. Facing numbers too low to ensure the continuation of their species, the survivors face extinction. The first mutant to be born since M-Day, Hope, was hunted down by rival factions of mutants seeking to control her and antimutant hate groups that wanted her dead. Rescued by the X-Men, she was sent into the wastelands of a future America with the time-traveler Cable, where he raised her as his daughter. Now, in SECOND COMING, they have returned to the present, finding the Xavier Institute in ruins and more enemies waiting for them. Led by Bastion, a highly advanced Sentinel (robots built to hunt down and exterminate mutants) with knowledge of the future, an antimutant extremist group launches an all-out attack, sending Hope and Cable back on the run. Hunted by enemies who are able to keep one step ahead, nowhere is safe, not even with the X-Men joining the fight to keep Hope safe. SECOND COMING is the third part of a saga that began with MESSIAH COMPLEX and continued with MESSIAH WAR. Like those two trade collections, SECOND COMING was originally published as a giant crossover between Marvel's major X-comics over the spring and summer of 2010. Whereas MESSIAH WAR was a slimmer, slower and more introspective volume of the series, SECOND COMING returns to the nonstop action and rapid-fire pace set by MESSIAH COMPLEX. It's a big story, filled with some heady violence and lots of thrills, but also moments of thoughtfulness. At its best, and like most good sci-fi works, the various X-Men titles are a reflection of societal ills, tackling issues of racism and feminism, equal rights, and terrorism. Throughout the Messiah series, which follows in the wake of a massive global genocide, there have been overtones of religion and faith. Characters question their role in dealing with the Mutant Messiah, particularly as the mutant population continues to erode further towards extinction. Scott Summers, leader of the X-Men, rationalizes much of his actions around his faith in Hope, a belief that she can and will save the mutant race. When it becomes apparent the lengths Summers is willing to go in the name of faith --- such as assembling X-Force, a black-ops group of killers led by Wolverine, charged with hunting down and exterminating their enemies --- many are disgusted. "That's the problem with faith," another X-Man tells him. "The stronger it gets, the more people tend to die." It's a prescient statement, given the harrowing circumstances surrounding SECOND COMING. For both the X-Men and the antimutant extremists, faith is a driving motivation. One side believes Hope will be the savior; the other side believes she will bring about a holocaust that will eradicate mankind. Each are engaged in a violent game of chess that has the body count rising, claiming the lives of multiple X-Men while others are severely wounded or permanently maimed. SECOND COMING is a very strong story produced by a collaborative talent of writers, artists and inkers working on the four X-titles the book was originally spread across. The multiple writers plotted out the story perfectly, tackling the multiple battles, chapter-ending cliffhangers, and future-history mumbo-jumbo with finesse. The group of artists all put forth a top-notch effort as well, particularly Mike Choi and Sonia Oback, the penciler and inker for the X-Force chapters. With exquisite, vibrant coloring and incredible attention to detail (one page featuring Wolverine leaping from the flames of an exploding gas station is impressively detailed with such terrific separation of space that it almost looks like he's leaping out of the page), they deliver the strongest and most stunning visuals of the book, particularly during a devastating moment of loss when a long-time X-Man and fan favorite is murdered by Bastion. The Messiah trilogy has been some of the strongest work the X-titles have seen in years, and the best series of crossovers since the big-event stories of the ’90s. While it dabbles with the past and future of the X-Men, paying homage to works like DAYS OF FUTURE PAST, casual readers will not need a crash course on the past 20 or 30 years of X-lore. The narrative and beautiful action pieces will be enough to draw most in, but longtime fans will find an awful lot to enjoy here. SECOND COMING layers on the action and suspense, building the storyline to a point of constricting hopelessness before releasing the valve. The climax is violent, sad and, yes, even hopeful.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Elin the Lightship

    Oh. My. I don't even. Words. Pretty much the most intense comic I've ever read. For me. Everything has lead up to this and there's no real light in the tunnel. Only a spark. A spark no one really knows but everybody clings to - Hope. She and Cable is back. And it hasn't been easy for either of them. For anyone in the mutant society. And it's not going to get easier, feel better to be on solid ground, not running through time from unknown threats. No. Because now, the 16 year old mutant Hope is seen Oh. My. I don't even. Words. Pretty much the most intense comic I've ever read. For me. Everything has lead up to this and there's no real light in the tunnel. Only a spark. A spark no one really knows but everybody clings to - Hope. She and Cable is back. And it hasn't been easy for either of them. For anyone in the mutant society. And it's not going to get easier, feel better to be on solid ground, not running through time from unknown threats. No. Because now, the 16 year old mutant Hope is seen as the savior of all and everyone looks at her. With hate in there eyes, fear, expectations or just plane longing for something better that tomorrow will bring. It gets hard. On everyone. How can you cope with something you couldn't even imagine you'd dream about in your worst nightmares? How do you move? I couldn't move. The impact this had on me is mainly because of the path I took in the crossover-jungle. This one alone will not let you get to know the background, the feelings, the relationships, why things are the way they are, why I started to cry without stopping for three different times. This is why I love comic books. This is what many of today's comics are lacking. I will not be able to let go of this one for a while. (edit: re-read it just three weeks later and couldn't handle myself.)

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