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Odd Et Les G�ants de Glace

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Dans un village nordique isol�, vit Odd, douze ans, un gar�on � qui la chance ne sourit gu�re: son p�re n'est jamais revenu d'une exp�dition viking, et un arbre a �cras� sa jambe, le laissant boiteux. Cette ann�e, l'hiver glacial ne se termine pas, rendant les villageois bougons et m�fiants. Un aigle, un ours et un renard apprennent � Odd pourquoi l'hiver a envahi le pays: Dans un village nordique isol�, vit Odd, douze ans, un gar�on � qui la chance ne sourit gu�re: son p�re n'est jamais revenu d'une exp�dition viking, et un arbre a �cras� sa jambe, le laissant boiteux. Cette ann�e, l'hiver glacial ne se termine pas, rendant les villageois bougons et m�fiants. Un aigle, un ours et un renard apprennent � Odd pourquoi l'hiver a envahi le pays: les g�ants de glace l'ont givr�. Seul un gar�on tr�s sp�cial, malin, optimiste et � l'�ternel sourire serait en mesure de ramener l'ordre chez les dieux, et la chaleur chez les hommes... � � la fois livre pour enfants tr�s r�ussi et un collector qui plaira aux adultes. Les enfants aimeront l'h�ro�sme discret d'Odd et l'aventure; les adultes adoreront les dieux chamailleurs. � l'arriv�e, une nouvelle combinaison gagnante pour Gaiman. � Kirkus Reviews � partir de 9 ans.


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Dans un village nordique isol�, vit Odd, douze ans, un gar�on � qui la chance ne sourit gu�re: son p�re n'est jamais revenu d'une exp�dition viking, et un arbre a �cras� sa jambe, le laissant boiteux. Cette ann�e, l'hiver glacial ne se termine pas, rendant les villageois bougons et m�fiants. Un aigle, un ours et un renard apprennent � Odd pourquoi l'hiver a envahi le pays: Dans un village nordique isol�, vit Odd, douze ans, un gar�on � qui la chance ne sourit gu�re: son p�re n'est jamais revenu d'une exp�dition viking, et un arbre a �cras� sa jambe, le laissant boiteux. Cette ann�e, l'hiver glacial ne se termine pas, rendant les villageois bougons et m�fiants. Un aigle, un ours et un renard apprennent � Odd pourquoi l'hiver a envahi le pays: les g�ants de glace l'ont givr�. Seul un gar�on tr�s sp�cial, malin, optimiste et � l'�ternel sourire serait en mesure de ramener l'ordre chez les dieux, et la chaleur chez les hommes... � � la fois livre pour enfants tr�s r�ussi et un collector qui plaira aux adultes. Les enfants aimeront l'h�ro�sme discret d'Odd et l'aventure; les adultes adoreront les dieux chamailleurs. � l'arriv�e, une nouvelle combinaison gagnante pour Gaiman. � Kirkus Reviews � partir de 9 ans.

30 review for Odd Et Les G�ants de Glace

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jayson

    (A-) 81% | Very Good Notes: It's a delightful read with a simple, yet original story. It knows exactly what it's supposed to be and does it very well.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte May

    This was a cute children’s story, thankfully much tamer than some of Gaiman’s other works which are more often than not, pretty terrifying. Odd lives with his mother and her new husband, since the disappearance and presumed death of Odd’s father. His step father is rude, nasty and often cruel to Odd. So one day he decides to leave, to walk to his father’s old hut, and remain there. While there Odd meets 3 animals, a fox, a bear and an eagle – but they are not as they appear. And once they begin t This was a cute children’s story, thankfully much tamer than some of Gaiman’s other works which are more often than not, pretty terrifying. Odd lives with his mother and her new husband, since the disappearance and presumed death of Odd’s father. His step father is rude, nasty and often cruel to Odd. So one day he decides to leave, to walk to his father’s old hut, and remain there. While there Odd meets 3 animals, a fox, a bear and an eagle – but they are not as they appear. And once they begin to talk everything changes for Odd, he soon realises he is actually speaking with the gods of Asgard – Thor, Odin and Loki. I liked Odd as a character, he walks with a limp, he is quite sassy and takes everything in his stride. This story was entertaining and enjoyable, would recommend to anyone looking for a short book with big heart.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sean Barrs the Bookdragon

    This book is a little treat. If you enjoyed Norse Mythology then you will likely adore this. This is a children’s tale, though as with all good children’s books it’s perfect for adults too. Odd is a tough little boy. He is physically disabled and shunned by his step-father who pushes him out of his family home, though he refuses to give up. He refuses to stop smiling and it is because of this that he succeeds. Positivity can go a long way and it certainly helps when you stumble across the Gods. I This book is a little treat. If you enjoyed Norse Mythology then you will likely adore this. This is a children’s tale, though as with all good children’s books it’s perfect for adults too. Odd is a tough little boy. He is physically disabled and shunned by his step-father who pushes him out of his family home, though he refuses to give up. He refuses to stop smiling and it is because of this that he succeeds. Positivity can go a long way and it certainly helps when you stumble across the Gods. Imagine this: Thor (who has been transformed into a bear) has his paw stuck in a tree after trying to reach a bee’s nest. Odin (who has been transformed into an eagle) flies overhead watching the scene. Loki (who has been transformed into a fox) skulks in the corner bemused. Odd walks in unawares and offers his help. The three Gods have been banished from Asgard and their kingdom is now in the hands of the Frost Giants. Unsurprisingly, it’s all Loki’s fault. Sound familiar? Gaiman has captured the essence of Odin, Thor and Loki terrifically. The marvel cinematic universe and the comic book writers do a good job with their personalities, though their actual physical attributes are completely wrong. It’s all in the minor details. Some of it may sound unimportant (the fact that Thor is supposed to have a big red beard for example) though things like this are quite important when dealing with Gods. So I like the attention to detail here. It’s a fun little book. And watching Odd resolve the problems of the Gods is amusing. I recommend it to fans of Thor as portrayed in the marvel cinematic universe.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sr3yas

    The noise of the blade hitting the thick icicle cracked off the hills around them, making echoes that sounded as if an entire army of men was hammering on the ice… "Odd and the Frost Giants" is a short, simple, magical and disarmingly beautiful tale that draws from Viking and Norse mythology. This is basically a children's book that features a much nicer version of beloved mythological characters! The tale introduces Odd, who is odd. Yes, it is odd. *Gaaaah, this is so confusing.* Odd is the n The noise of the blade hitting the thick icicle cracked off the hills around them, making echoes that sounded as if an entire army of men was hammering on the ice… "Odd and the Frost Giants" is a short, simple, magical and disarmingly beautiful tale that draws from Viking and Norse mythology. This is basically a children's book that features a much nicer version of beloved mythological characters! The tale introduces Odd, who is odd. Yes, it is odd. *Gaaaah, this is so confusing.* Odd is the name of a Viking child. He is brave little lad but luck has never been his friend. He ran away from his home because of his cruel stepfather. While Odd was on the run, he came across the Gods of Asgard who have gotten themselves into a bit of trouble.... And Odd volunteers to help them! A short and beautifully crafted story which had me smiling all the way! My favorite moments were (view spoiler)[ The rainbow moment. Newton would be so proud. Go science! The BFG moment. Odd using psychotherapy on frost giant! (hide spoiler)] Overall, this is the perfect dessert to have after reading Norse Mythology (Because it is sweet... get it? GET IT?) Neil Gaiman can do no wrong!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stacey

    Each time I read something by Gaiman, I think, “This. This is where he excels.” Whether it's a fairy story (Stardust,) or a children's story (Coraline.) Or the melding of American Mythology with a new Mythology of his creation (American Gods, Anansi Boys.) Maybe it's something vaguely steampunkish and other-worldly, like Neverwhere. Sometimes it's when I revist the complexities in Sandman. Or maybe I'm not actually that fickle, and I just like the way his phrasing and ideas are like mainlining s Each time I read something by Gaiman, I think, “This. This is where he excels.” Whether it's a fairy story (Stardust,) or a children's story (Coraline.) Or the melding of American Mythology with a new Mythology of his creation (American Gods, Anansi Boys.) Maybe it's something vaguely steampunkish and other-worldly, like Neverwhere. Sometimes it's when I revist the complexities in Sandman. Or maybe I'm not actually that fickle, and I just like the way his phrasing and ideas are like mainlining story straight into my amygdalae, so most of the time it doesn't really matter what type of fiction he's writing this time. I like best to listen to his novels in audio format; it makes me feel like I'm wrapped in a big quilt and being read to like a child. Odd is another installment in his latest string of children's tales. This one borrows heavily from Norse mythology, but mostly through allusion to other, more established stories. I had to go look some of them up – like how Odin sacrificed an eye to gain knowledge and wisdom from Mímir's Well, and about Jötunheimr, the Land of Giants. I love that there's a deeper layer of complexity to the story – but only if the reader desires it. In this completely Gaiman-invented tale, Odd, a young woodcutter's son, runs away from a cruel stepfather, and ends up meeting Odin, Thor and Loki, who have been outsmarted by a giant. I both read and listened to this tale, it's quite short. The audio file was well under 2 hours in length. I probably could have read it alone in far less than an hour. This edition has wonderful little pencil drawing illustrations by Brett Helquist, which underscore its suitability for children. And it is just wonderful for kids, without any focus on the darker themes present in Coraline, or even The Graveyard Book. I think it would make a fabulous springboard for homestudy elementary school children, as an introduction to mythology. This one really is for all ages. Audio ***** Story *****

  6. 5 out of 5

    PorshaJo

    What a wonderful way to follow up Gaiman's Norse Mythology. Odd and the Frost Giants is a story about Odd, a young boy, and his meeting with Loki, Thor, and Odin. Er, though not in their normal form, in animal form (a fox, a bear, and an eagle). Odd is on his way with the trio to Asgard to save it from the Frost Giants. Who, thanks to Loki naturally, put them into animal form and has taken over Asgard. What a great story. Wonderful to read this one to young children. The story is short and the bo What a wonderful way to follow up Gaiman's Norse Mythology. Odd and the Frost Giants is a story about Odd, a young boy, and his meeting with Loki, Thor, and Odin. Er, though not in their normal form, in animal form (a fox, a bear, and an eagle). Odd is on his way with the trio to Asgard to save it from the Frost Giants. Who, thanks to Loki naturally, put them into animal form and has taken over Asgard. What a great story. Wonderful to read this one to young children. The story is short and the book is filled with amazing drawings in black and white. There is no need to read Norse Mythology first, I just happened to do it. I'm just happy that I saw a tip here on GR that said it's the perfect follow up...and it was. A true gem of a book that I think children will love to read. And big 'children' too. Ha!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nat

    “The wise man knows when to keep silent. Only the fool tells all he knows.” This tale follows Odd, a young Viking boy, left fatherless following a raid and in his icy, ancient world where there is no mercy for an unlucky soul with a crushed foot and no one to protect him. Fleeing to the woods, Odd stumbles upon and releases a trapped bear. And then Odd's destiny begins to change. The eagle, bear and fox Odd encounters are Norse gods, trapped in animal form by the evil frost giants who have conq “The wise man knows when to keep silent. Only the fool tells all he knows.” This tale follows Odd, a young Viking boy, left fatherless following a raid and in his icy, ancient world where there is no mercy for an unlucky soul with a crushed foot and no one to protect him. Fleeing to the woods, Odd stumbles upon and releases a trapped bear. And then Odd's destiny begins to change. The eagle, bear and fox Odd encounters are Norse gods, trapped in animal form by the evil frost giants who have conquered Asgard, the city of the gods. Bear: Thor. Eagle: Lord Odin. Fox: Loki. Now our hero must reclaim Thor's hammer, outwit the frost giants and release the gods. One of the main reasons I picked this book up was because I wanted to get through a book really quickly and thanks to the gorgeous illustrations, this book flew by. Here are a few of the gorgeous illustrations: Of course, the Goddess Freya saves the day. She was my favorite. Though it was a quick read, it didn't really impact me that much. I was glad to have something to add to my reading challenge... but other than that, it wasn't that memorable and I'll probably forget about it by the very next day. *Note: I'm an Amazon Affiliate. If you're interested in buying Odd and the Frost Giants, just click on the image below to go through my link. I'll make a small commission!* Support creators you love. Buy a Coffee for nat (bookspoils) with http://Ko-fi.com/bookspoils

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    What a delightful counterpoint to Norse Mythology! I mean, yes, it's written for middle-grade and Thor and Loki are cute and Odin is inscrutable as always and the frost giant is funny rather than scary because, after all, EVERYONE is afraid of Freya's tongue... but it's still a real delight! I don't care what anyone says about Gaiman. The man can write a classy tale no matter where or what he's writing about. This is, after all, only a retelling of an old story, but it's a very particular and beau What a delightful counterpoint to Norse Mythology! I mean, yes, it's written for middle-grade and Thor and Loki are cute and Odin is inscrutable as always and the frost giant is funny rather than scary because, after all, EVERYONE is afraid of Freya's tongue... but it's still a real delight! I don't care what anyone says about Gaiman. The man can write a classy tale no matter where or what he's writing about. This is, after all, only a retelling of an old story, but it's a very particular and beautiful Odd viewpoint. I'll definitely be reading this to my girl when she gets a little older. :) Heck. It might even be time now. :)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lyn

    Odd and the Frost Giants is a short novel by Neil Gaiman probably intended for a young adult audience, or younger, or older; it is a fun, fable-like story. Odd is a young Viking boy who has an adventure amongst a setting in Norse mythology. A fan of American Gods will recognize Gaiman’s voice and a fan of DreamWorks film How to Train Your Dragon would also like this short work.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Annet

    My third Gaiman, a fairy tale for kids but also for the older people, like me :-) As a kid, I used to love all fairytales.... I enjoyed this short novel, 'inspired by traditional Norse mythology'. The pencil drawings in the book also beautiful. 3.5 going on 4. Entertaining short read! It's about a boy named Odd, going on an adventure with a bear, an eagle and a fox... There was a boy called Odd, and there was nothing strange or unusual about that, not in that time or place. Odd meant 'the tip of a My third Gaiman, a fairy tale for kids but also for the older people, like me :-) As a kid, I used to love all fairytales.... I enjoyed this short novel, 'inspired by traditional Norse mythology'. The pencil drawings in the book also beautiful. 3.5 going on 4. Entertaining short read! It's about a boy named Odd, going on an adventure with a bear, an eagle and a fox... There was a boy called Odd, and there was nothing strange or unusual about that, not in that time or place. Odd meant 'the tip of a blade', and it was a lucky name. He was odd though. At least, the other villagers thought so. But if there was one thing that he wasn't, it was lucky....

  11. 4 out of 5

    Trish

    As mentioned a few days ago already, this is the special edition of a story Neil Gaiman wrote and published for World Book Day in the UK in 2008. The book is about the titular viking boy Odd (meaning "the tip of a blade" and not "strange"), who had a terrible accident after his father died in an equally terrible accident (they are not the most lucky of people), leaving Odd with a disability. He is shunted in the village for being weak until one day he leaves to go back to his father's old hut in As mentioned a few days ago already, this is the special edition of a story Neil Gaiman wrote and published for World Book Day in the UK in 2008. The book is about the titular viking boy Odd (meaning "the tip of a blade" and not "strange"), who had a terrible accident after his father died in an equally terrible accident (they are not the most lucky of people), leaving Odd with a disability. He is shunted in the village for being weak until one day he leaves to go back to his father's old hut in the woods. There, he meats a fox, a bear and an eagle, some frost giants and gods of Asgard, travels over a rainbow bridge and proves that physical strength isn't everything. I won't say more about the tale because that would spoil it. Some might call this a simple tale, but it also a very old one. Or, at least, a variation of a very old and prominent Norse tale. The way Gaiman tells it with his dry humour and charming descriptions, this viking world comes to life, making this the perfect story for a delightful winter afternoon (and not just for children either). It might also be worth mentioning that Neil Gaiman manages to get all the mythological details absolutely right, therefore teaching the reader a thing or two about Norse mythology in general. However, what makes this book truly special is the combination of Gaiman's magical word-weaving with Chris Riddell's equally magical illustrations. The silver details are simply stunning and very appropriate for the wintery theme. I have included a picture of how the chapters begin and one of my favourite ornament at the bottom of a page (they are all different) but unfortunately the camera cannot adequately show the silver glint, you'll simply have to believe me. A true treasure and I'm very happy that I waited for it (instead of getting the normal paperback edition).

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jason Koivu

    Odd and the Frost Giants is such a short and easy read, you'll gulp it down in an instant and be shouting to Neil Gaiman, "Next!" This is the most childish Gaiman story I've read yet and that's saying something. But it's not saying something as negative as some might take it. Odd... is intended for the kiddies. It's not a terrible introduction for youngsters into the realm of Norse mythology. In it, a crippled boy meets a few anthropomorphic animals who turn out to be outcast gods, who need this Odd and the Frost Giants is such a short and easy read, you'll gulp it down in an instant and be shouting to Neil Gaiman, "Next!" This is the most childish Gaiman story I've read yet and that's saying something. But it's not saying something as negative as some might take it. Odd... is intended for the kiddies. It's not a terrible introduction for youngsters into the realm of Norse mythology. In it, a crippled boy meets a few anthropomorphic animals who turn out to be outcast gods, who need this mortal's help in tricking their frost giant enemies so they can get back into Asgard. Gaiman falls back on very familiar territory for this one, tapping Odin, Thor and his hammer, and the crafty conniver Loki in his usual role of mischief-maker. There is very little new or inventive stuff going on here in this mini adventure. It reads like a tv producer who's taken a classic episode of a popular show, rearranged the scenes a little, and presented it for your viewing pleasure. And it is a pleasure! It just feels all too familiar.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Leila

    This is an unusual little book. It is an excellent introduction to Norse Mytholoogy for children and an easy and delightful read for adults, especially those with some knowledge of Norse Mythology. Odd is a pleasing personality..a crippled young boy with a grim and physically painful life. He has a lot of innate courage and an extremely calm attititude and he decides to set out on a quest - a familiar theme in both adult and children's books. However he sets off with some sensible preparations t This is an unusual little book. It is an excellent introduction to Norse Mytholoogy for children and an easy and delightful read for adults, especially those with some knowledge of Norse Mythology. Odd is a pleasing personality..a crippled young boy with a grim and physically painful life. He has a lot of innate courage and an extremely calm attititude and he decides to set out on a quest - a familiar theme in both adult and children's books. However he sets off with some sensible preparations to keep him alive but not much idea where he will go and what he will encounter. What follows is a charming tale of his adventures on a child's simple level, but the author encourages the reader to think more deeply about all that happens throughout his encounters with the Gods. The book has a lovely ending too which will please children. It is very differentfrom the last book I read by this author but also contains magical elements to surprise and please. I did keep stopping along the way to ponder upon this and that. If you like Neil Gaiman do try this book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Phrynne

    A nice little fantasy aimed at older children but absolutely fine for adults too. The story is based on old Norse tales and is woven around Thor, Odin, Loki and our young hero whose name is Odd. Only 120 pages of well spaced text, I read this book in the time it took me to prepare dinner. I still enjoyed it very much as I do nearly everything this author writes:)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    Odd is a young Norseman, who lost his father after a Viking raid. He is partly disabled after a tree fell on his leg. His mother has now re-married and his new step-father cares little for him preferring his own children. This year the winter is dragging on and on, and having now had enough of home, heads out to a hut his father owned in the forest. In the forest he comes across a bear with his paw stuck; he frees it. The bear is grateful, and Odd learns that the bear and his companions, a fox an Odd is a young Norseman, who lost his father after a Viking raid. He is partly disabled after a tree fell on his leg. His mother has now re-married and his new step-father cares little for him preferring his own children. This year the winter is dragging on and on, and having now had enough of home, heads out to a hut his father owned in the forest. In the forest he comes across a bear with his paw stuck; he frees it. The bear is grateful, and Odd learns that the bear and his companions, a fox and an eagle, are actually the gods Loki, Odin and Thor. They have been tricked by a Frost Giant and cast out of Asgard. It is this Frost Giant that is stopping spring returning by holding the land in a perpetual winter. Odd travel with the gods back to Asgard. They stay overnight at Mimir Well, where in the pool Odd sees his parents in their youth and receives advice on the task ahead. Odd then travels on ahead to confront the Frost Giant with the hope of returning equilibrium to the land. Gaiman has a way of taking a bunch of known characters, in this case the Norse Gods, and adding a little twist, having a young lad face the wroth of a huge ice giant. But it is also about the change from childhood to adulthood, as Odd finds his purpose in life. Great little children’s book.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mario

    A wonderful book to start off a year with. Neil Gaiman truly is one of best authors ever.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Danielle The Book Huntress (Back to the Books)

    Odd and the Frost Giants was a quick, but very rewarding book to listen to on audio. The author himself narrated, and his voice is very pleasant to listen to. He knows his characters best and animated them as richly as he had intended them. The Norse mythology elements were interesting, and I loved how Mr. Gaiman injects a humorous view of the constant strife between the Aesir and the Frost Giants. He embodies the traits of Odin, Thor, and Loki very well, and their animal forms fit what characte Odd and the Frost Giants was a quick, but very rewarding book to listen to on audio. The author himself narrated, and his voice is very pleasant to listen to. He knows his characters best and animated them as richly as he had intended them. The Norse mythology elements were interesting, and I loved how Mr. Gaiman injects a humorous view of the constant strife between the Aesir and the Frost Giants. He embodies the traits of Odin, Thor, and Loki very well, and their animal forms fit what characteristics one would attribute to the three Norse gods. In this story, the frost giants are almost portrayed, but not quite, as the underdogs, caught in a losing war with the Aesir. It cracked me up how afraid of Lady Freya's complaining the lead frost giants were. I absolutely adored Odd, with his oh-so annoying smile that he put on his face exactly when he wanted to disarm or frustrate someone else. He was a really good guy. I liked that he was able to figure out a way out of most of the scrapes he found himself in, and met obstacles in a calm, thoughtful manner. I wanted everything to work out for this kid, because he deserved it. I don't have much more to say since this is a pretty short little book. The only thing I could add is that I enjoyed it immensely! Overall rating: 4.5/5.0 stars.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    I will admit that this is the second time I have read this book although the version I first read was the world book day paperback (no idea why why Goodreads insists I have read the hardback version). Either way this is a much better presented version of the Norse tale than previous versions - with of course the addition of atmospheric illustrations. I think for me one of the appeals of Neil Gaiman is his ability to weave tales in style that I can easily get in to - reading only a few pages I fee I will admit that this is the second time I have read this book although the version I first read was the world book day paperback (no idea why why Goodreads insists I have read the hardback version). Either way this is a much better presented version of the Norse tale than previous versions - with of course the addition of atmospheric illustrations. I think for me one of the appeals of Neil Gaiman is his ability to weave tales in style that I can easily get in to - reading only a few pages I feel connected to the story and ready to face what adventures and adversities my befall our hero (or heroine). But I think what really shows his power as a story teller is the fact that he can convey quite stark and unsettling ideas without sanitising them or making like of them. For me this book is one of those stories you can read again and again and still enjoy it even though it is less that 130 pages long you still feel as though you have been on some epic journey and considering the Norse connection that is as it should be. Now I am convinced that there was another tale about Odd however for the life of me I cannot find it or even reference to it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Alice-Elizabeth (marriedtobooks)

    Listened to this story on audiobook via my library's BorrowBox service! Odd was a far better story than The Sleeper and the Spindle. Who would have thought that Norse legends/mythology could be so interesting? In the audio edition, Neil narrates it himself as we follow young Odd who lost his father due to a raid conducted by vikings. In this year, the winter doesn't seem to stop and with struggles in his home with mother, step-father and step-siblings, Odd ventures out towards a hut that was belo Listened to this story on audiobook via my library's BorrowBox service! Odd was a far better story than The Sleeper and the Spindle. Who would have thought that Norse legends/mythology could be so interesting? In the audio edition, Neil narrates it himself as we follow young Odd who lost his father due to a raid conducted by vikings. In this year, the winter doesn't seem to stop and with struggles in his home with mother, step-father and step-siblings, Odd ventures out towards a hut that was belonging to his father. On the way, he meets animals such as a bear and an eagle. Each one of the animals has a hidden secret, as well as a mission. Their mission is to save their community from the so-called frost giants. With an interesting premise, creative world-building and adventure, it was a pleasant listen. Only the odd one or two chapters where I felt a little lost. For someone who is new to the Norse legends, it was a fun introduction!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Magdalena

    A beautifully written story inspired by Norse mythology and aimed at children that is bound to bring smile to your face. Gaiman, as always, delivers!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cinda

    Pleasant story laced with trademark Gaiman humor.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Evelina | AvalinahsBooks

    This a wonderful short coming of age tale, dressed in the fine fantasy based on Norse mythology. I thoroughly enjoyed it! Odd, although his name doesn't mean that where he lives, is still actually pretty odd. Nobody gets him. It gets worse when his father dies and he greatly injures his leg. Things get so tough, Odd decides to leave and never come back. But as he does, something happens... Odd meets some gods in trouble. Namely, Odin, Thor and Loki. And he sort of ends up helping them out. It's a This a wonderful short coming of age tale, dressed in the fine fantasy based on Norse mythology. I thoroughly enjoyed it! Odd, although his name doesn't mean that where he lives, is still actually pretty odd. Nobody gets him. It gets worse when his father dies and he greatly injures his leg. Things get so tough, Odd decides to leave and never come back. But as he does, something happens... Odd meets some gods in trouble. Namely, Odin, Thor and Loki. And he sort of ends up helping them out. It's a really cool short tale, and it's really empowering about how someone who is misunderstood can succeed if they don't let themselves be put down by others. Odd is disabled because of his leg, but that doesn't mean he isn't, well, able - he can take care of himself, and he can even outwit supernatural creatures, and besides being cunning, he is also incredibly brave. I really loved this character, and I also really REALLY loved the portrayals of the Norse gods! I won't tell you why because the story is short enough and I don't want to spoil it - but you'll certainly know why when you read it. It was incredibly enjoyable!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lata

    3.5 stars. Read this to my child, who really enjoyed it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    A fast and fun tale giving a twist to Norse lore. Narrated by the author, Neil Gaiman. OVERALL GRADE: B minus to B.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    This is Neil Gaiman's take on Scandinavian mythology for a younger audience. But there are so many things in it that make it more than a modernized version of a myth. We get Norse society from the point of view of a young boy. We get allusions to Viking raids, the haunting sadness of Odd's mother, and the unpleasantness of life with an unwelcoming stepfather. Life, despite its fleeting beauties and touches of humour, can be "nasty, brutish and short." Odd, like many of Gaiman's heroes, is an odd This is Neil Gaiman's take on Scandinavian mythology for a younger audience. But there are so many things in it that make it more than a modernized version of a myth. We get Norse society from the point of view of a young boy. We get allusions to Viking raids, the haunting sadness of Odd's mother, and the unpleasantness of life with an unwelcoming stepfather. Life, despite its fleeting beauties and touches of humour, can be "nasty, brutish and short." Odd, like many of Gaiman's heroes, is an oddity who undergoes an odyssey to discover himself. Like Odysseus, he is lamed when young (albeit not in infancy). His trip does not take him to the underworld, but gives us a glimpse of the world and of Jotunheim, which is quite harsh enough for a young wanderer. The gods are portrayed sometimes as grand and wild, while at other times they are figures of comedy; sometimes they are brimming with mystery and power but often they are gullible and vulnerable. Odd, like Tolkien's hobbits, comes back from his adventures in some ways the same as ever but also vastly altered.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    It was probably more fun listening to Neil Gaiman read Odd and the Frost Giants than to read it. He's a good reader -- not all authors are good at reading their own work, but he is: he brings it to life, giving each character a distinctive voice without it sounding at all forced. The story itself is a simple one, based on the gods of Norse saga with a few wry references to events mentioned in the Prose Edda (Loki turning himself into a mare, for example). There's a surprising number of references It was probably more fun listening to Neil Gaiman read Odd and the Frost Giants than to read it. He's a good reader -- not all authors are good at reading their own work, but he is: he brings it to life, giving each character a distinctive voice without it sounding at all forced. The story itself is a simple one, based on the gods of Norse saga with a few wry references to events mentioned in the Prose Edda (Loki turning himself into a mare, for example). There's a surprising number of references and jokes that are mostly meant, I think, for a more adult audience, even though the protagonist is a child and the story is relatively simple. Neil doesn't talk down to the child reader/listener, just talks to them, telling it straight. Very enjoyable.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Tanja Berg

    "By March, the worst of the winter would be over. The snow would thaw, the rivers begin to run, and the world would wake into itself again. Not that year. Winter hung in there, like an invalid refusing to die. Day after grey day the ice stayed hard, the world remained unfriendly and cold." That sounds about like the current winter I'm living through, the absolute worst one for a good 15 years. That includes winter spent far further north. Maybe the frost giants have invaded Asgard again? It certain "By March, the worst of the winter would be over. The snow would thaw, the rivers begin to run, and the world would wake into itself again. Not that year. Winter hung in there, like an invalid refusing to die. Day after grey day the ice stayed hard, the world remained unfriendly and cold." That sounds about like the current winter I'm living through, the absolute worst one for a good 15 years. That includes winter spent far further north. Maybe the frost giants have invaded Asgard again? It certainly feels like it. This is a delightful book, beautifully illustrated with an unlikely hero - the crippled Odd. Definitely recommended and absolutely a book I will cherish in years to come.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    3.0 to 3.5 stars. An excellent children's story set in the world of Norse mythology. I listened to the audio version of this book (read by Neil Gaiman himself) which really added to the enjoyment of the story. Definitely one to read out loud to the kids until they are old enough to enjoy his more mature books.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Nils | nilsreviewsit

    I read Odd and the Frost Giants with my nephew over the Christmas holidays, and what a brilliant time we both had! We really enjoyed discussing the illustrations together and taking it in turns to read aloud and do various “voices” for the characters. This in my opinion is a lovely story for both adults and children, filled with whimsical magic and a good old fun filled adventure. Basically, all the things you’d expect from Neil Gaiman. Odd, the main character, after the death of his father becom I read Odd and the Frost Giants with my nephew over the Christmas holidays, and what a brilliant time we both had! We really enjoyed discussing the illustrations together and taking it in turns to read aloud and do various “voices” for the characters. This in my opinion is a lovely story for both adults and children, filled with whimsical magic and a good old fun filled adventure. Basically, all the things you’d expect from Neil Gaiman. Odd, the main character, after the death of his father becomes injured and cannot walk properly. He is then shunned and mocked by the villager’s, including his stepfather, and becomes extremely lonely and distant. He sets out with his crutch and a piece of stolen salmon, to live in his father’s wood carving shed. Here he meets a bear, a fox and an eagle, and sets out on a journey. I love books that include mythology, and this has plenty of it; I mean we had Asgard, Frost Giants, and the Bifrost! This made my little nerdy heart so happy. I particularly liked the humour in this one. The banter between the bear and the fox had me laughing out loud! I was also really pleased to see Gaiman portray a young boy with a disability. Yes, Odd is lonely, but more than that he has a determination, a will to do things even if it’s hard going, and he never stopped smiling. This is the type of character I think we need more of, so I definitely recommend this book to all of you.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

    Half-way between a fairy Tale and Norse mythology. You can't help but love Odd, the unusual hero of the story and his even less usual methods. He is a child who has lost his father, whose mother has remarried and his stepfather is not the most welcoming one. One day something happens and unlucky Odd sort of runs away and bumps into a bear, an eagle and a Fox, and that's where the real adventure begins. It brought back memories of my childhood days lying on The carpet reading a fairy Tale about a Half-way between a fairy Tale and Norse mythology. You can't help but love Odd, the unusual hero of the story and his even less usual methods. He is a child who has lost his father, whose mother has remarried and his stepfather is not the most welcoming one. One day something happens and unlucky Odd sort of runs away and bumps into a bear, an eagle and a Fox, and that's where the real adventure begins. It brought back memories of my childhood days lying on The carpet reading a fairy Tale about a Norwegian Prince who turned into a bear because a witch had cast a spell on him- I don't remember the name but I loved it-And Odd reminds me so much of Hiccup it made me smile all the time. I must admit I have issues with Neil Gaiman, sometimes I love his stories and sometimes I can't finish them. This is one of the good ones.

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